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Noddy
Guest

Sat Sep 03, 2016 4:23 am   



On 03/09/16 7:34 AM, Je�us wrote:

Quote:
**I don't understand what they're thinking. My last car was a 1992
Commodore. When I bought it, my mechanic remarked that it was the least
stolen Commodore. Looking at the security system, it is easy to
understand why. It had the usual remote controlled immobiliser/alarm
system. The kicker was that the keyswitch to disable the alarm was
inside the passenger side door. To access it, the door had to be opened.
On exiting the car, I placed the key in the lock and turned it 90
degrees. This enabled the 'deadlocking' function. It was then impossible
to open the doors (including the tailgate) with the alarm button/central
locking. The key was essential. Even if a thief smashed a window, it was
impossible to open the doors. A very difficult car to steal. And that
was back in 1992!

Sounds good for it's intended purpose, but also potentially dangerous
if something goes wrong and a person is trapped in the car.


There's some peculiar side effects with such systems as well.

I have a 2008 Holden Barina here at the moment which belongs to the
young daughter of one of my former neighbours. She dropped it up on
Wednesday for me to give it a basic service, but to also see if I could
sort out a problem it's having with it's immobiliser.

She somehow managed to loose both original keys which have a built in
fob, and only has a "valet" key with no fob which means that she has to
open and lock the car using the key in the lock. The problem is that the
car has a bug in that you can lock the car just fine, but when you
*unlock* the car it sets the hazard lights flashing for around a minute
as if it's being stolen (it has no alarm). The car will start right away
just fine and the hazards can't be turned off and must go through this
minute or so long cycle by themselves where they'll eventually turn off
and everything is fine until next time you try to unlock the door.

If you unlock the passenger's side door it doesn't happen :)







--
--
--
Regards,
Noddy.

D Walford
Guest

Sat Sep 03, 2016 5:09 am   



On 3/09/2016 8:23 AM, Noddy wrote:
Quote:
On 03/09/16 7:34 AM, Je�us wrote:

**I don't understand what they're thinking. My last car was a 1992
Commodore. When I bought it, my mechanic remarked that it was the least
stolen Commodore. Looking at the security system, it is easy to
understand why. It had the usual remote controlled immobiliser/alarm
system. The kicker was that the keyswitch to disable the alarm was
inside the passenger side door. To access it, the door had to be opened.
On exiting the car, I placed the key in the lock and turned it 90
degrees. This enabled the 'deadlocking' function. It was then impossible
to open the doors (including the tailgate) with the alarm button/central
locking. The key was essential. Even if a thief smashed a window, it was
impossible to open the doors. A very difficult car to steal. And that
was back in 1992!

Sounds good for it's intended purpose, but also potentially dangerous
if something goes wrong and a person is trapped in the car.

There's some peculiar side effects with such systems as well.

I have a 2008 Holden Barina here at the moment which belongs to the
young daughter of one of my former neighbours. She dropped it up on
Wednesday for me to give it a basic service, but to also see if I could
sort out a problem it's having with it's immobiliser.

She somehow managed to loose both original keys which have a built in
fob, and only has a "valet" key with no fob which means that she has to
open and lock the car using the key in the lock. The problem is that the
car has a bug in that you can lock the car just fine, but when you
*unlock* the car it sets the hazard lights flashing for around a minute
as if it's being stolen (it has no alarm). The car will start right away
just fine and the hazards can't be turned off and must go through this
minute or so long cycle by themselves where they'll eventually turn off
and everything is fine until next time you try to unlock the door.

If you unlock the passenger's side door it doesn't happen :)







Bizarre, I would tell her that the car is punishing her for being dumb
enough to loose both the keys:-)

--
Daryl

Trevor Wilson
Guest

Sat Sep 03, 2016 6:40 am   



On 3/09/2016 7:34 AM, Je�us wrote:
Quote:
On Fri, 2 Sep 2016 10:07:28 +1000, Trevor Wilson
trevor_at_SPAMBLOCKrageaudio.com.au> wrote:

**I don't understand what they're thinking. My last car was a 1992
Commodore. When I bought it, my mechanic remarked that it was the least
stolen Commodore. Looking at the security system, it is easy to
understand why. It had the usual remote controlled immobiliser/alarm
system. The kicker was that the keyswitch to disable the alarm was
inside the passenger side door. To access it, the door had to be opened.
On exiting the car, I placed the key in the lock and turned it 90
degrees. This enabled the 'deadlocking' function. It was then impossible
to open the doors (including the tailgate) with the alarm button/central
locking. The key was essential. Even if a thief smashed a window, it was
impossible to open the doors. A very difficult car to steal. And that
was back in 1992!

Sounds good for it's intended purpose, but also potentially dangerous
if something goes wrong and a person is trapped in the car.


**I can't see a problem, unless someone is dumb enough to deadlock the
car, when someone is inside and then lose both keys (and any other that
happen to have been cut). The keys were about $10.00 each for that
model, as the remote control was a separate thing. I liked it a lot,
because I frequently carried valuable equipment in the car and never
once in the 10 years of ownership was the car broken into. Something
which cannot be said for any of my other cars I've owned. I suspect the
car thieves are well aware of just how difficult they are to steal. It's
also the only car I've owned that I didn't lock the keys inside of
because I was always in the habit of deadlocking the doors and that can
only be done with the key from the outside. Brilliant, simple system.

--
Trevor Wilson
www.rageaudio.com.au

Noddy
Guest

Sat Sep 03, 2016 7:30 am   



On 03/09/16 9:09 AM, D Walford wrote:

Quote:
If you unlock the passenger's side door it doesn't happen :)

Bizarre, I would tell her that the car is punishing her for being dumb
enough to loose both the keys:-)


Lol :)

She just left actually after picking the thing up, and she announced
that she's getting rid of it in favour of a VW Polo.

I'm not sure if that's a massive step up :)




--
--
--
Regards,
Noddy.

D Walford
Guest

Sat Sep 03, 2016 2:14 pm   



On 3/09/2016 10:40 AM, Trevor Wilson wrote:
Quote:
On 3/09/2016 7:34 AM, Je�us wrote:
On Fri, 2 Sep 2016 10:07:28 +1000, Trevor Wilson
trevor_at_SPAMBLOCKrageaudio.com.au> wrote:

**I don't understand what they're thinking. My last car was a 1992
Commodore. When I bought it, my mechanic remarked that it was the least
stolen Commodore. Looking at the security system, it is easy to
understand why. It had the usual remote controlled immobiliser/alarm
system. The kicker was that the keyswitch to disable the alarm was
inside the passenger side door. To access it, the door had to be opened.
On exiting the car, I placed the key in the lock and turned it 90
degrees. This enabled the 'deadlocking' function. It was then impossible
to open the doors (including the tailgate) with the alarm button/central
locking. The key was essential. Even if a thief smashed a window, it was
impossible to open the doors. A very difficult car to steal. And that
was back in 1992!

Sounds good for it's intended purpose, but also potentially dangerous
if something goes wrong and a person is trapped in the car.


**I can't see a problem, unless someone is dumb enough to deadlock the
car, when someone is inside and then lose both keys (and any other that
happen to have been cut). The keys were about $10.00 each for that
model, as the remote control was a separate thing. I liked it a lot,
because I frequently carried valuable equipment in the car and never
once in the 10 years of ownership was the car broken into. Something
which cannot be said for any of my other cars I've owned. I suspect the
car thieves are well aware of just how difficult they are to steal.


Doubt it, getting a car broken into is just bad luck and if you have had
it happen more than once I very much doubt that it has anything to do
with the type of car you own.
BTW its very very easy to break into a deadlocked Commodore, you just
smash a window.

It's
Quote:
also the only car I've owned that I didn't lock the keys inside of
because I was always in the habit of deadlocking the doors and that can
only be done with the key from the outside. Brilliant, simple system.

You don't paint a very good picture of yourself:-)


--
Daryl

Trevor Wilson
Guest

Sun Sep 04, 2016 7:12 am   



On 3/09/2016 6:14 PM, D Walford wrote:
Quote:
On 3/09/2016 10:40 AM, Trevor Wilson wrote:
On 3/09/2016 7:34 AM, Je�us wrote:
On Fri, 2 Sep 2016 10:07:28 +1000, Trevor Wilson
trevor_at_SPAMBLOCKrageaudio.com.au> wrote:

**I don't understand what they're thinking. My last car was a 1992
Commodore. When I bought it, my mechanic remarked that it was the least
stolen Commodore. Looking at the security system, it is easy to
understand why. It had the usual remote controlled immobiliser/alarm
system. The kicker was that the keyswitch to disable the alarm was
inside the passenger side door. To access it, the door had to be
opened.
On exiting the car, I placed the key in the lock and turned it 90
degrees. This enabled the 'deadlocking' function. It was then
impossible
to open the doors (including the tailgate) with the alarm
button/central
locking. The key was essential. Even if a thief smashed a window, it
was
impossible to open the doors. A very difficult car to steal. And that
was back in 1992!

Sounds good for it's intended purpose, but also potentially dangerous
if something goes wrong and a person is trapped in the car.


**I can't see a problem, unless someone is dumb enough to deadlock the
car, when someone is inside and then lose both keys (and any other that
happen to have been cut). The keys were about $10.00 each for that
model, as the remote control was a separate thing. I liked it a lot,
because I frequently carried valuable equipment in the car and never
once in the 10 years of ownership was the car broken into. Something
which cannot be said for any of my other cars I've owned. I suspect the
car thieves are well aware of just how difficult they are to steal.

Doubt it, getting a car broken into is just bad luck and if you have had
it happen more than once I very much doubt that it has anything to do
with the type of car you own.
BTW its very very easy to break into a deadlocked Commodore, you just
smash a window.


**Correct. Trouble is, everything then has to be removed via that
window, because it is still impossible to open the doors.

Quote:

It's
also the only car I've owned that I didn't lock the keys inside of
because I was always in the habit of deadlocking the doors and that can
only be done with the key from the outside. Brilliant, simple system.

You don't paint a very good picture of yourself:-)


**Howso? Have you never locked the keys inside any of your cars? I've
never done with a car that uses remote central locking, but manual
locking is a whole nuther thing.


--
Trevor Wilson
www.rageaudio.com.au

D Walford
Guest

Sun Sep 04, 2016 7:30 am   



On 4/09/2016 11:12 AM, Trevor Wilson wrote:
Quote:
On 3/09/2016 6:14 PM, D Walford wrote:
On 3/09/2016 10:40 AM, Trevor Wilson wrote:
On 3/09/2016 7:34 AM, Je�us wrote:
On Fri, 2 Sep 2016 10:07:28 +1000, Trevor Wilson
trevor_at_SPAMBLOCKrageaudio.com.au> wrote:

**I don't understand what they're thinking. My last car was a 1992
Commodore. When I bought it, my mechanic remarked that it was the
least
stolen Commodore. Looking at the security system, it is easy to
understand why. It had the usual remote controlled immobiliser/alarm
system. The kicker was that the keyswitch to disable the alarm was
inside the passenger side door. To access it, the door had to be
opened.
On exiting the car, I placed the key in the lock and turned it 90
degrees. This enabled the 'deadlocking' function. It was then
impossible
to open the doors (including the tailgate) with the alarm
button/central
locking. The key was essential. Even if a thief smashed a window, it
was
impossible to open the doors. A very difficult car to steal. And that
was back in 1992!

Sounds good for it's intended purpose, but also potentially dangerous
if something goes wrong and a person is trapped in the car.


**I can't see a problem, unless someone is dumb enough to deadlock the
car, when someone is inside and then lose both keys (and any other that
happen to have been cut). The keys were about $10.00 each for that
model, as the remote control was a separate thing. I liked it a lot,
because I frequently carried valuable equipment in the car and never
once in the 10 years of ownership was the car broken into. Something
which cannot be said for any of my other cars I've owned. I suspect the
car thieves are well aware of just how difficult they are to steal.

Doubt it, getting a car broken into is just bad luck and if you have had
it happen more than once I very much doubt that it has anything to do
with the type of car you own.
BTW its very very easy to break into a deadlocked Commodore, you just
smash a window.

**Correct. Trouble is, everything then has to be removed via that
window, because it is still impossible to open the doors.


Not easy to do if you are in a public place and don't want to draw
attention to yourself or you don't want to damage the door but very easy
with a battery angle grinder, no such thing as a totally secure car.

Quote:


It's
also the only car I've owned that I didn't lock the keys inside of
because I was always in the habit of deadlocking the doors and that can
only be done with the key from the outside. Brilliant, simple system.

You don't paint a very good picture of yourself:-)


**Howso? Have you never locked the keys inside any of your cars?


Maybe once in 45yrs.


--
Daryl

pedro
Guest

Sun Sep 04, 2016 4:40 pm   



On Sat, 3 Sep 2016 08:23:41 +1000, Noddy <me_at_wardengineering.com>
wrote:

Quote:
She somehow managed to loose both original keys which have a built in
fob, and only has a "valet" key with no fob which means that she has to
open and lock the car using the key in the lock.


She's blonde, right? Wink

Noddy
Guest

Sun Sep 04, 2016 5:00 pm   



On 04/09/16 8:40 PM, pedro wrote:

Quote:
She somehow managed to loose both original keys which have a built in
fob, and only has a "valet" key with no fob which means that she has to
open and lock the car using the key in the lock.

She's blonde, right? Wink


Lol :)

She has blonde tips in her hair, so I'm sure that accounts for something :)





--
--
--
Regards,
Noddy.

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