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Emanuele Girlando
Guest

Mon Feb 22, 2010 12:46 am   



http://xoomer.virgilio.it/egirland/unknown/index.html
Tubes are: one EF800, one EF80 and one ..missing (??).

Can anybody out there help me identifying this stuff?
What is it? Where is it coming out from?
What is that big black cylinder?
What is the strange component close to the variable cap in the second
picture?

Thank you.
Emanuele (iw1dhi).

Bill Noble
Guest

Mon Feb 22, 2010 12:46 am   



one hint is the motor/generator - that kind of sets it up as probably
military - at least I assume that is what the siemens black cylinder is - I
can't read the text on the label

"Emanuele Girlando" <emanuele_girlando_at_yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:9008bf15-e147-4c71-b0bc-ab03a3b608ab_at_y33g2000yqb.googlegroups.com...
Quote:
http://xoomer.virgilio.it/egirland/unknown/index.html
Tubes are: one EF800, one EF80 and one ..missing (??).

Can anybody out there help me identifying this stuff?
What is it? Where is it coming out from?
What is that big black cylinder?
What is the strange component close to the variable cap in the second
picture?

Thank you.
Emanuele (iw1dhi).



philo
Guest

Mon Feb 22, 2010 12:46 am   



Emanuele Girlando wrote:
Quote:
http://xoomer.virgilio.it/egirland/unknown/index.html
Tubes are: one EF800, one EF80 and one ..missing (??).

Can anybody out there help me identifying this stuff?
What is it? Where is it coming out from?
What is that big black cylinder?


Looks like a dynamotor

(a dc motor driving a dc generator)



Quote:
What is the strange component close to the variable cap in the second
picture?

Thank you.
Emanuele (iw1dhi).



tm
Guest

Mon Feb 22, 2010 2:29 am   



It has 100 kHz on the label and 50 C so I would think it is some form of
oven crystal oscillator.

Tom


"Emanuele Girlando" <emanuele_girlando_at_yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:9008bf15-e147-4c71-b0bc-ab03a3b608ab_at_y33g2000yqb.googlegroups.com...
Quote:
http://xoomer.virgilio.it/egirland/unknown/index.html
Tubes are: one EF800, one EF80 and one ..missing (??).

Can anybody out there help me identifying this stuff?
What is it? Where is it coming out from?
What is that big black cylinder?
What is the strange component close to the variable cap in the second
picture?

Thank you.
Emanuele (iw1dhi).



Paul_P
Guest

Mon Feb 22, 2010 2:38 am   



"Emanuele Girlando" <emanuele_girlando_at_yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:9008bf15-e147-4c71-b0bc-ab03a3b608ab_at_y33g2000yqb.googlegroups.com...
Quote:
http://xoomer.virgilio.it/egirland/unknown/index.html
Tubes are: one EF800, one EF80 and one ..missing (??).

Can anybody out there help me identifying this stuff?
What is it? Where is it coming out from?
What is that big black cylinder?
What is the strange component close to the variable cap in the second
picture?

Thank you.
Emanuele (iw1dhi).



The canister looks like a crystal oven.

Paul P.

Paul_P
Guest

Mon Feb 22, 2010 2:39 am   



"Emanuele Girlando" <emanuele_girlando_at_yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:9008bf15-e147-4c71-b0bc-ab03a3b608ab_at_y33g2000yqb.googlegroups.com...
Quote:
http://xoomer.virgilio.it/egirland/unknown/index.html
Tubes are: one EF800, one EF80 and one ..missing (??).

Can anybody out there help me identifying this stuff?
What is it? Where is it coming out from?
What is that big black cylinder?
What is the strange component close to the variable cap in the second
picture?

Thank you.
Emanuele (iw1dhi).



The canister looks like a crystal oven

Paul P.

Ken
Guest

Mon Feb 22, 2010 2:45 am   



Emanuele Girlando wrote:
Quote:
http://xoomer.virgilio.it/egirland/unknown/index.html
Tubes are: one EF800, one EF80 and one ..missing (??).

Can anybody out there help me identifying this stuff?
What is it? Where is it coming out from?
What is that big black cylinder?
What is the strange component close to the variable cap in the second
picture?

Thank you.
Emanuele (iw1dhi).


The cylinder could be a xtal oven??? Ken


Jeffrey Angus
Guest

Mon Feb 22, 2010 3:24 am   



On 2/21/2010 4:46 PM, Emanuele Girlando wrote:
Quote:
http://xoomer.virgilio.it/egirland/unknown/index.html
Tubes are: one EF800, one EF80 and one ..missing (??).

Can anybody out there help me identifying this stuff?
What is it? Where is it coming out from?
What is that big black cylinder?
What is the strange component close to the variable cap in the second
picture?

The big black thing is a temperature controlled oven for a crystal.
Notably a 100.0 KHz crystal.

I suspect the square object adjacent to the variable capacitor is
another cyrstal, although, not crystal controlled, and adjusted
for frequency with the variable capacitor next to it.

Jeff

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Mon Feb 22, 2010 4:54 am   



On Sun, 21 Feb 2010 20:24:54 -0600, Jeffrey Angus
<jangus_at_suddenlink.net> wrote:

Quote:
On 2/21/2010 4:46 PM, Emanuele Girlando wrote:
http://xoomer.virgilio.it/egirland/unknown/index.html
Tubes are: one EF800, one EF80 and one ..missing (??).

Can anybody out there help me identifying this stuff?
What is it? Where is it coming out from?
What is that big black cylinder?
What is the strange component close to the variable cap in the second
picture?

The big black thing is a temperature controlled oven for a crystal.
Notably a 100.0 KHz crystal.

Yep. It says so on the label. The 20VDC operating voltage kinda
suggests that this thing runs on 24VDC as in aircraft or military.

Quote:
I suspect the square object adjacent to the variable capacitor is
another cyrstal, although, not crystal controlled, and adjusted
for frequency with the variable capacitor next to it.

My guess(tm) it's a ferrite pot core inductor. The hole in the middle
is for adjustments. Judging by the ratty lacing cord around the
chopped off wire bundle and several uninsulated resistors, I would
guess it's from the 1940's or 50's.

As for the entire contrivance, I would guess it's part of a frequency
standard or piece of test equipment. Possibly a frequency reference.
Quote:
Jeff

The other Jeff.

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

Jeffrey D Angus
Guest

Mon Feb 22, 2010 8:34 pm   



Emanuele Girlando wrote:
Quote:
I thought about a crystal OSC oven... but @100,0KHz! What kind of
application could require a so precise, so stable but so low in
frequency signal?

Well, a frequency standard. Or they use harmonics to calibrate
equipment at regular intervals.

Jeff



--
“Egotism is the anesthetic that dulls the pain of stupidity.”
Frank Leahy, Head coach, Notre Dame 1941-1954

http://www.stay-connect.com

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Mon Feb 22, 2010 9:07 pm   



On Mon, 22 Feb 2010 11:32:13 -0800 (PST), Emanuele Girlando
<egirland_at_gmail.com> wrote:

Quote:
I thought about a crystal OSC oven... but @100,0KHz! What kind of
application could require a so precise, so stable but so low in
frequency signal?

Thinking in terms of the 1950-60's, a comb generator (a signal every
100KHz from DC to light), reference clock for driving other pieces of
test equipment, Loran C or navigation reference, some manner of
synthesizer reference, NavSat reference, inertial navigation system
reference clock, precision motor driver, really old tube type digital
clock, etc.

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

tm
Guest

Mon Feb 22, 2010 9:08 pm   



"Emanuele Girlando" <egirland_at_gmail.com> wrote in message
news:ce00cc71-8ec8-4b77-9d87-47214d5e6fd5_at_k19g2000yqc.googlegroups.com...

Yes,
I thought about a crystal OSC oven... but @100,0KHz! What kind of
application could require a so precise, so stable but so low in
frequency signal?

PS: clicking on the pictures you can enlarge them so that you can read
the oven label...

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++


Loran?

Emanuele Girlando
Guest

Mon Feb 22, 2010 9:32 pm   



On 22 Feb, 04:54, Jeff Liebermann <je...@cruzio.com> wrote:
Quote:
On Sun, 21 Feb 2010 20:24:54 -0600, Jeffrey Angus

jan...@suddenlink.net> wrote:
On 2/21/2010 4:46 PM, Emanuele Girlando wrote:
http://xoomer.virgilio.it/egirland/unknown/index.html
Tubes are: one EF800, one EF80 and one ..missing (??).

Can anybody out there help me identifying this stuff?
What is it? Where is it coming out from?
What is that big black cylinder?
What is the strange component close to the variable cap in the second
picture?

The big black thing is a temperature controlled oven for a crystal.
Notably a 100.0 KHz crystal.

Yep.  It says so on the label.  The 20VDC operating voltage kinda
suggests that this thing runs on 24VDC as in aircraft or military.

I suspect the square object adjacent to the variable capacitor is
another cyrstal, although, not crystal controlled, and adjusted
for frequency with the variable capacitor next to it.

My guess(tm) it's a ferrite pot core inductor.  The hole in the middle
is for adjustments.  Judging by the ratty lacing cord around the
chopped off wire bundle and several uninsulated resistors, I would
guess it's from the 1940's or 50's.

As for the entire contrivance, I would guess it's part of a frequency
standard or piece of test equipment.  Possibly a frequency reference.

Jeff

The other Jeff.

--
Jeff Liebermann     je...@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann     AE6KS    831-336-2558

Yes,
I thought about a crystal OSC oven... but @100,0KHz! What kind of
application could require a so precise, so stable but so low in
frequency signal?

PS: clicking on the pictures you can enlarge them so that you can read
the oven label...

Brenda Ann
Guest

Mon Feb 22, 2010 10:10 pm   



"Emanuele Girlando" <egirland_at_gmail.com> wrote in message
news:ce00cc71-8ec8-4b77-9d87-47214d5e6fd5_at_k19g2000yqc.googlegroups.com...

Yes,
I thought about a crystal OSC oven... but @100,0KHz! What kind of
application could require a so precise, so stable but so low in
frequency signal?

PS: clicking on the pictures you can enlarge them so that you can read
the oven label...


*****************************************************************
Most commonly, they were used as marker/calibration generators in military
(and some commercial) HF receivers, to facilitate easy of reading frequency
on the analog dials.

Randy
Guest

Mon Feb 22, 2010 10:56 pm   



100KC reference such as this would be adequate as a "reference" for
most communications receivers and such as several have suggested -
however several also suggested navigation reference clocks - which I
will comment on: such a reference would not be anywhere near accurate
for most navigation measurements- I don't know of a navigation system
(time based) that used a reference that "low" and inaccurate. LORAN A
based on such would only resolve to a mile or so; LORAN C would be
only slightly better (decent LORAN C receivers even in the early '60s
could resolve to a few hundred yards minimum - often better. Today .1
to .25 mile is "norm" depending on location on the hyper lines). To
run at that sort of accuracy - they need a system clock at least 1MC -
preferably with a stability of 3x10-6 (that's 10 to the minus 6) or
better. Today's standards run at 3x10-10 to 3x10-12. The Coast Guard
currently maintains accuracy of the C chains to something like
2x10-13. Point being - TDA and TDB are measured in microseconds -
which is kinda hard to do (accurately) with a 10 microsecond clock.

SINS is another time based nav system that requires a relatively high
accuracy clock. Even the SINS from the 50s were running against clocks
in the several hundred kilocycles - which itself was slaved to the
boat's master clock - which was a URQ series standard running at 1MC
(URQ-9,10) or 5MC (URQ13/23). The early SINS could get away with
sub-MC clocks because their integrators were analog (linear mode) vs.
digital (approximated mode) - i.e. offset errors of the slower clock
don't accumulate as they do in a an incremental (digital) integrator).
Even with these early SINS computers / integrators - their clock were
way above 100KC. I wouldn't want to navigate a tight spot with a SINS
limited to that kind of (lack of) accuracy. I'll note that not only
receivers - but signal generators often used a reference like the one
in the picture to produce "beat notes" to allow zeroing the dial every
100KC (my HP 606B has a 1MC & 100KC generator that allows "zero
beating" the dial every 100KC with a "check" at 1MC to make sure the
adjustment is).

just my .02
rg

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