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In praise of S-Plan7.0 (for block diagrams)

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Guest

Tue Jan 29, 2019 8:45 pm   



FWIW--I was using various programs--MSPaint, OpenOffice Draw--
late last night trying to draw a block diagram for a new
system. But I was spending hours fighting lame limitations
and quirks with each program, and the result was rotten &
ugly.

I formerly used CorelDraw for this sort of work, but Windows'
'progress' has finally broken my tried-and-true friend. So
last night I PayPal'd ~$50US for S-Plan7.0 over at
ABACOM-online.de, and was up and running in ten minutes. No
kidding.

It's meant as a schematic-drawing program, but it's quite good
for block diagrams, too.

Some of the main advantages for drawing block diagrams were that
it has built-in easy snap-to-grid, reasonable defaults that closely
match the task, and super fast, low-click access to adjusting line
widths, adding text, zooming in and out, etc.

Anti-bloatware, light & fast. 5MB, had it within two minutes of
check-out, installed in two minutes more. Superb.

It's just for /drawing/ schematics. It doesn't put out netlists,
it doesn't interface with any other CAD program, it's just for
preparing schematic artwork. (It will, however, output a BOM.)

SPRINT LAYOUT
I've used and recommended their PCB layout program, Sprint
Layout, for years. That too is just an artwork /drawing/
program that lets you put pads and edit traces wherever you
want, super-easily, and super-quickly. Think "tape-and-mylar,"
but quickly, on a computer.

Sprint Layout doesn't use or accept netlists, that's up to you,
but I haven't found it to matter. You can click on pins you
intend to connect, and Sprint Layout will put up a "rubber band"
trace until you've routed it--that's handy. Four-layers, max. I
use Sprint Layout to design quickie prototypes and for doing
preliminary parts-placements. It has more than earned its keep.

HTH.

Cheers,
James Arthur

John Larkin
Guest

Tue Jan 29, 2019 8:45 pm   



On Tue, 29 Jan 2019 10:50:54 -0800 (PST), dagmargoodboat_at_yahoo.com
wrote:

Quote:
FWIW--I was using various programs--MSPaint, OpenOffice Draw--
late last night trying to draw a block diagram for a new
system. But I was spending hours fighting lame limitations
and quirks with each program, and the result was rotten &
ugly.

I formerly used CorelDraw for this sort of work, but Windows'
'progress' has finally broken my tried-and-true friend. So
last night I PayPal'd ~$50US for S-Plan7.0 over at
ABACOM-online.de, and was up and running in ten minutes. No
kidding.

It's meant as a schematic-drawing program, but it's quite good
for block diagrams, too.

Some of the main advantages for drawing block diagrams were that
it has built-in easy snap-to-grid, reasonable defaults that closely
match the task, and super fast, low-click access to adjusting line
widths, adding text, zooming in and out, etc.

Anti-bloatware, light & fast. 5MB, had it within two minutes of
check-out, installed in two minutes more. Superb.

It's just for /drawing/ schematics. It doesn't put out netlists,
it doesn't interface with any other CAD program, it's just for
preparing schematic artwork. (It will, however, output a BOM.)

SPRINT LAYOUT
I've used and recommended their PCB layout program, Sprint
Layout, for years. That too is just an artwork /drawing/
program that lets you put pads and edit traces wherever you
want, super-easily, and super-quickly. Think "tape-and-mylar,"
but quickly, on a computer.

Sprint Layout doesn't use or accept netlists, that's up to you,
but I haven't found it to matter. You can click on pins you
intend to connect, and Sprint Layout will put up a "rubber band"
trace until you've routed it--that's handy. Four-layers, max. I
use Sprint Layout to design quickie prototypes and for doing
preliminary parts-placements. It has more than earned its keep.

HTH.

Cheers,
James Arthur


For $50, I might give it a try.

I use an old version of Visio for block diagrams. I created a bunch of
electronic symbols. It's OK. I export the diagrams as EMF files, which
look good in Word docs. It is object oriented, which helps a lot.

PADS PCB allows one to lay out a board without a schematic netlist, in
"ECO" mode. You can import parts and add connections any way you like.


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc
picosecond timing precision measurement

jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com
http://www.highlandtechnology.com


Guest

Tue Jan 29, 2019 9:45 pm   



dagmargoodboat wrote
Quote:
FWIW--I was using various programs--MSPaint, OpenOffice Draw--
late last night trying to draw a block diagram for a new
system. But I was spending hours fighting lame limitations
and quirks with each program, and the result was rotten &
ugly.


Linux has xfig, very simple to draw blocks and lock to grid,
export is selectable in in about 30 different formats, pictures, pdf,
whathave you.
Should be on any Linux system.
http://panteltje.com/pub/xfig_example.gif
http://panteltje.com/pub/xfig_workspace.gif

Then there is gimp, but using it is more complicated

and then there is Blender, make your own movies:
https://www.blender.org/

All are free as in beer.

There is also free peeseebee software.


Guest

Tue Jan 29, 2019 9:45 pm   



On Tuesday, January 29, 2019 at 2:51:19 PM UTC-5, 69883925...@nospam.org wrote:
Quote:
dagmargoodboat wrote
FWIW--I was using various programs--MSPaint, OpenOffice Draw--
late last night trying to draw a block diagram for a new
system. But I was spending hours fighting lame limitations
and quirks with each program, and the result was rotten &
ugly.

Linux has xfig, very simple to draw blocks and lock to grid,
export is selectable in in about 30 different formats, pictures, pdf,
whathave you.
Should be on any Linux system.
http://panteltje.com/pub/xfig_example.gif
http://panteltje.com/pub/xfig_workspace.gif

Then there is gimp, but using it is more complicated

and then there is Blender, make your own movies:
https://www.blender.org/

All are free as in beer.

There is also free peeseebee software.


Hey, nothing wrong with free beer! (Except I've got to watch
my girlish figure these days--no non-utilitarian calories!)

It's long past time I should've switched to Linux, but I'm
already spending too much time at computer screens.
Xfig looks interesting.

I bought an old P.C. with a serviceable Linux installed. I'll
have to repair it (bad CPU cooler), and get rolling some time.

Cheers,
James Arthur

P.S. I should've mentioned in the OP that Sprint Layout doesn't
use netlists, but it does output Gerbers.

George Herold
Guest

Tue Jan 29, 2019 10:45 pm   



On Tuesday, January 29, 2019 at 2:03:03 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote:
Quote:
On Tue, 29 Jan 2019 10:50:54 -0800 (PST), dagmargoodboat_at_yahoo.com
wrote:

FWIW--I was using various programs--MSPaint, OpenOffice Draw--
late last night trying to draw a block diagram for a new
system. But I was spending hours fighting lame limitations
and quirks with each program, and the result was rotten &
ugly.

I formerly used CorelDraw for this sort of work, but Windows'
'progress' has finally broken my tried-and-true friend. So
last night I PayPal'd ~$50US for S-Plan7.0 over at
ABACOM-online.de, and was up and running in ten minutes. No
kidding.

It's meant as a schematic-drawing program, but it's quite good
for block diagrams, too.

Some of the main advantages for drawing block diagrams were that
it has built-in easy snap-to-grid, reasonable defaults that closely
match the task, and super fast, low-click access to adjusting line
widths, adding text, zooming in and out, etc.

Anti-bloatware, light & fast. 5MB, had it within two minutes of
check-out, installed in two minutes more. Superb.

It's just for /drawing/ schematics. It doesn't put out netlists,
it doesn't interface with any other CAD program, it's just for
preparing schematic artwork. (It will, however, output a BOM.)

SPRINT LAYOUT
I've used and recommended their PCB layout program, Sprint
Layout, for years. That too is just an artwork /drawing/
program that lets you put pads and edit traces wherever you
want, super-easily, and super-quickly. Think "tape-and-mylar,"
but quickly, on a computer.

Sprint Layout doesn't use or accept netlists, that's up to you,
but I haven't found it to matter. You can click on pins you
intend to connect, and Sprint Layout will put up a "rubber band"
trace until you've routed it--that's handy. Four-layers, max. I
use Sprint Layout to design quickie prototypes and for doing
preliminary parts-placements. It has more than earned its keep.

HTH.

Cheers,
James Arthur

For $50, I might give it a try.

I use an old version of Visio for block diagrams. I created a bunch of
electronic symbols. It's OK. I export the diagrams as EMF files, which
look good in Word docs. It is object oriented, which helps a lot.

PADS PCB allows one to lay out a board without a schematic netlist, in
"ECO" mode. You can import parts and add connections any way you like.


Yup, An old version of visio, It only runs on a virtual Win 95... which is
kinda troubling. I've used it for front panel art work too.
The later versions of visio stink. (It's sad when that happens to
software.)

And Thanks James, I probably won't look for something new until my
current 'tool' fails.

George H.


Quote:
--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc
picosecond timing precision measurement

jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com
http://www.highlandtechnology.com


John Larkin
Guest

Tue Jan 29, 2019 11:45 pm   



On Tue, 29 Jan 2019 12:51:51 -0800 (PST), George Herold
<gherold_at_teachspin.com> wrote:

Quote:
On Tuesday, January 29, 2019 at 2:03:03 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote:
On Tue, 29 Jan 2019 10:50:54 -0800 (PST), dagmargoodboat_at_yahoo.com
wrote:

FWIW--I was using various programs--MSPaint, OpenOffice Draw--
late last night trying to draw a block diagram for a new
system. But I was spending hours fighting lame limitations
and quirks with each program, and the result was rotten &
ugly.

I formerly used CorelDraw for this sort of work, but Windows'
'progress' has finally broken my tried-and-true friend. So
last night I PayPal'd ~$50US for S-Plan7.0 over at
ABACOM-online.de, and was up and running in ten minutes. No
kidding.

It's meant as a schematic-drawing program, but it's quite good
for block diagrams, too.

Some of the main advantages for drawing block diagrams were that
it has built-in easy snap-to-grid, reasonable defaults that closely
match the task, and super fast, low-click access to adjusting line
widths, adding text, zooming in and out, etc.

Anti-bloatware, light & fast. 5MB, had it within two minutes of
check-out, installed in two minutes more. Superb.

It's just for /drawing/ schematics. It doesn't put out netlists,
it doesn't interface with any other CAD program, it's just for
preparing schematic artwork. (It will, however, output a BOM.)

SPRINT LAYOUT
I've used and recommended their PCB layout program, Sprint
Layout, for years. That too is just an artwork /drawing/
program that lets you put pads and edit traces wherever you
want, super-easily, and super-quickly. Think "tape-and-mylar,"
but quickly, on a computer.

Sprint Layout doesn't use or accept netlists, that's up to you,
but I haven't found it to matter. You can click on pins you
intend to connect, and Sprint Layout will put up a "rubber band"
trace until you've routed it--that's handy. Four-layers, max. I
use Sprint Layout to design quickie prototypes and for doing
preliminary parts-placements. It has more than earned its keep.

HTH.

Cheers,
James Arthur

For $50, I might give it a try.

I use an old version of Visio for block diagrams. I created a bunch of
electronic symbols. It's OK. I export the diagrams as EMF files, which
look good in Word docs. It is object oriented, which helps a lot.

PADS PCB allows one to lay out a board without a schematic netlist, in
"ECO" mode. You can import parts and add connections any way you like.


Yup, An old version of visio, It only runs on a virtual Win 95... which is
kinda troubling. I've used it for front panel art work too.
The later versions of visio stink. (It's sad when that happens to
software.)

And Thanks James, I probably won't look for something new until my
current 'tool' fails.

George H.




I use Visio 2002 Pro, which works fine under Win 7. I've heard that
Microsoft wrecked later versions.


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc
picosecond timing precision measurement

jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com
http://www.highlandtechnology.com

George Herold
Guest

Wed Jan 30, 2019 1:45 am   



On Tuesday, January 29, 2019 at 5:13:14 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote:
Quote:
On Tue, 29 Jan 2019 12:51:51 -0800 (PST), George Herold
gherold_at_teachspin.com> wrote:

On Tuesday, January 29, 2019 at 2:03:03 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote:
On Tue, 29 Jan 2019 10:50:54 -0800 (PST), dagmargoodboat_at_yahoo.com
wrote:

FWIW--I was using various programs--MSPaint, OpenOffice Draw--
late last night trying to draw a block diagram for a new
system. But I was spending hours fighting lame limitations
and quirks with each program, and the result was rotten &
ugly.

I formerly used CorelDraw for this sort of work, but Windows'
'progress' has finally broken my tried-and-true friend. So
last night I PayPal'd ~$50US for S-Plan7.0 over at
ABACOM-online.de, and was up and running in ten minutes. No
kidding.

It's meant as a schematic-drawing program, but it's quite good
for block diagrams, too.

Some of the main advantages for drawing block diagrams were that
it has built-in easy snap-to-grid, reasonable defaults that closely
match the task, and super fast, low-click access to adjusting line
widths, adding text, zooming in and out, etc.

Anti-bloatware, light & fast. 5MB, had it within two minutes of
check-out, installed in two minutes more. Superb.

It's just for /drawing/ schematics. It doesn't put out netlists,
it doesn't interface with any other CAD program, it's just for
preparing schematic artwork. (It will, however, output a BOM.)

SPRINT LAYOUT
I've used and recommended their PCB layout program, Sprint
Layout, for years. That too is just an artwork /drawing/
program that lets you put pads and edit traces wherever you
want, super-easily, and super-quickly. Think "tape-and-mylar,"
but quickly, on a computer.

Sprint Layout doesn't use or accept netlists, that's up to you,
but I haven't found it to matter. You can click on pins you
intend to connect, and Sprint Layout will put up a "rubber band"
trace until you've routed it--that's handy. Four-layers, max. I
use Sprint Layout to design quickie prototypes and for doing
preliminary parts-placements. It has more than earned its keep.

HTH.

Cheers,
James Arthur

For $50, I might give it a try.

I use an old version of Visio for block diagrams. I created a bunch of
electronic symbols. It's OK. I export the diagrams as EMF files, which
look good in Word docs. It is object oriented, which helps a lot.

PADS PCB allows one to lay out a board without a schematic netlist, in
"ECO" mode. You can import parts and add connections any way you like.


Yup, An old version of visio, It only runs on a virtual Win 95... which is
kinda troubling. I've used it for front panel art work too.
The later versions of visio stink. (It's sad when that happens to
software.)

And Thanks James, I probably won't look for something new until my
current 'tool' fails.

George H.




I use Visio 2002 Pro, which works fine under Win 7. I've heard that
Microsoft wrecked later versions.


I've got a pre-MS version... maybe 4.1 or 4.5?


It does everything I want.

George H.
Quote:
--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc
picosecond timing precision measurement

jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com
http://www.highlandtechnology.com



Guest

Wed Jan 30, 2019 2:45 am   



On Tuesday, January 29, 2019 at 2:03:03 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote:
Quote:
On Tue, 29 Jan 2019 10:50:54 -0800 (PST), dagmargoodboat_at_yahoo.com
wrote:

FWIW--I was using various programs--MSPaint, OpenOffice Draw--
late last night trying to draw a block diagram for a new
system. But I was spending hours fighting lame limitations
and quirks with each program, and the result was rotten &
ugly.

I formerly used CorelDraw for this sort of work, but Windows'
'progress' has finally broken my tried-and-true friend. So
last night I PayPal'd ~$50US for S-Plan7.0 over at
ABACOM-online.de, and was up and running in ten minutes. No
kidding.

It's meant as a schematic-drawing program, but it's quite good
for block diagrams, too.

Some of the main advantages for drawing block diagrams were that
it has built-in easy snap-to-grid, reasonable defaults that closely
match the task, and super fast, low-click access to adjusting line
widths, adding text, zooming in and out, etc.

Anti-bloatware, light & fast. 5MB, had it within two minutes of
check-out, installed in two minutes more. Superb.

It's just for /drawing/ schematics. It doesn't put out netlists,
it doesn't interface with any other CAD program, it's just for
preparing schematic artwork. (It will, however, output a BOM.)

SPRINT LAYOUT
I've used and recommended their PCB layout program, Sprint
Layout, for years. That too is just an artwork /drawing/
program that lets you put pads and edit traces wherever you
want, super-easily, and super-quickly. Think "tape-and-mylar,"
but quickly, on a computer.

Sprint Layout doesn't use or accept netlists, that's up to you,
but I haven't found it to matter. You can click on pins you
intend to connect, and Sprint Layout will put up a "rubber band"
trace until you've routed it--that's handy. Four-layers, max. I
use Sprint Layout to design quickie prototypes and for doing
preliminary parts-placements. It has more than earned its keep.

HTH.

Cheers,
James Arthur

For $50, I might give it a try.

I use an old version of Visio for block diagrams. I created a bunch of
electronic symbols. It's OK. I export the diagrams as EMF files, which
look good in Word docs. It is object oriented, which helps a lot.

PADS PCB allows one to lay out a board without a schematic netlist, in
"ECO" mode. You can import parts and add connections any way you like.


I've got a copy of Visio 2000 still in the box. I almost loaded it
last time this came up, on your recommendation. Can't remember what
stopped me...

SPlan has a free "can't save or export" version on the website. I'm not
sure it's quite enough to get the full feel of it, though.

It took me a couple hours to realize that bare-bones SprintLayout
from the same people wasn't bare bones at all, it was *elegant.*

Click on text and you're instantly editing, with a full pop-up panel
giving you full access to all the typeface, size, and other options,
no need to click a bunch of multi-level pull-down menus to change
each attribute. It's a breath of fresh air.

Engineering software by engineers.

Cheers,
James Arthur

Phil Hobbs
Guest

Wed Jan 30, 2019 10:45 pm   



On 1/29/19 7:17 PM, George Herold wrote:
Quote:
On Tuesday, January 29, 2019 at 5:13:14 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote:
On Tue, 29 Jan 2019 12:51:51 -0800 (PST), George Herold
gherold_at_teachspin.com> wrote:

On Tuesday, January 29, 2019 at 2:03:03 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote:
On Tue, 29 Jan 2019 10:50:54 -0800 (PST), dagmargoodboat_at_yahoo.com
wrote:

FWIW--I was using various programs--MSPaint, OpenOffice Draw--
late last night trying to draw a block diagram for a new
system. But I was spending hours fighting lame limitations
and quirks with each program, and the result was rotten &
ugly.

I formerly used CorelDraw for this sort of work, but Windows'
'progress' has finally broken my tried-and-true friend. So
last night I PayPal'd ~$50US for S-Plan7.0 over at
ABACOM-online.de, and was up and running in ten minutes. No
kidding.

It's meant as a schematic-drawing program, but it's quite good
for block diagrams, too.

Some of the main advantages for drawing block diagrams were that
it has built-in easy snap-to-grid, reasonable defaults that closely
match the task, and super fast, low-click access to adjusting line
widths, adding text, zooming in and out, etc.

Anti-bloatware, light & fast. 5MB, had it within two minutes of
check-out, installed in two minutes more. Superb.

It's just for /drawing/ schematics. It doesn't put out netlists,
it doesn't interface with any other CAD program, it's just for
preparing schematic artwork. (It will, however, output a BOM.)

SPRINT LAYOUT
I've used and recommended their PCB layout program, Sprint
Layout, for years. That too is just an artwork /drawing/
program that lets you put pads and edit traces wherever you
want, super-easily, and super-quickly. Think "tape-and-mylar,"
but quickly, on a computer.

Sprint Layout doesn't use or accept netlists, that's up to you,
but I haven't found it to matter. You can click on pins you
intend to connect, and Sprint Layout will put up a "rubber band"
trace until you've routed it--that's handy. Four-layers, max. I
use Sprint Layout to design quickie prototypes and for doing
preliminary parts-placements. It has more than earned its keep.

HTH.

Cheers,
James Arthur

For $50, I might give it a try.

I use an old version of Visio for block diagrams. I created a bunch of
electronic symbols. It's OK. I export the diagrams as EMF files, which
look good in Word docs. It is object oriented, which helps a lot.

PADS PCB allows one to lay out a board without a schematic netlist, in
"ECO" mode. You can import parts and add connections any way you like.


Yup, An old version of visio, It only runs on a virtual Win 95... which is
kinda troubling. I've used it for front panel art work too.
The later versions of visio stink. (It's sad when that happens to
software.)

And Thanks James, I probably won't look for something new until my
current 'tool' fails.

George H.




I use Visio 2002 Pro, which works fine under Win 7. I've heard that
Microsoft wrecked later versions.


I've got a pre-MS version... maybe 4.1 or 4.5?

It does everything I want.


Freelance 4.0 for DOS rules. ;)

I draw everything in it.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs


--
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

http://electrooptical.net
http://hobbs-eo.com

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Thu Jan 31, 2019 7:45 am   



On Tue, 29 Jan 2019 14:13:06 -0800, John Larkin
<jjlarkin_at_highland_snip_technology.com> wrote:

Quote:
I use Visio 2002 Pro, which works fine under Win 7. I've heard that
Microsoft wrecked later versions.


I use MS Office Visio 2007 (12.0). I won't say they wrecked it. Just
left a mess of bugs not fixed. This might help.
It's the "Visio Bugs (er... Issues)" sub forum:
<http://visguy.com/vgforum/index.php?board=12.0>
My problem with Visio is that some things only work when viewed using
Internet Exploder. Try it. Here's my unfinished Visio scribble of
our local ham radio repeater network:
<http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/K6BJ-Network/>
<http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/K6BJ-Network/K6BJ-Network.htm>
Viewed using Firefox or any other on Microsoft browser, hitting
<Ctrl><Enter) on any of the stock stencils used does nothing (such as
the two computer boxes). However, under IE, it produces a table of
details and attributes, a pan and zoom window, a search box, and a
different navigation window. I don't know if any of the later
versions of Windoze have the same browser problems.

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

o pere o
Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 10:45 am   



On 29/1/19 20:51, 698839253X6D445TD_at_nospam.org wrote:
Quote:
dagmargoodboat wrote
FWIW--I was using various programs--MSPaint, OpenOffice Draw--
late last night trying to draw a block diagram for a new
system. But I was spending hours fighting lame limitations
and quirks with each program, and the result was rotten &
ugly.

Linux has xfig, very simple to draw blocks and lock to grid,
export is selectable in in about 30 different formats, pictures, pdf,
whathave you.
Should be on any Linux system.
http://panteltje.com/pub/xfig_example.gif
http://panteltje.com/pub/xfig_workspace.gif

Then there is gimp, but using it is more complicated

and then there is Blender, make your own movies:
https://www.blender.org/

All are free as in beer.

There is also free peeseebee software.


And don't forget inkscape which gives you nice SVG drawings.

Pere

Simon S Aysdie
Guest

Sat Feb 02, 2019 3:45 am   



On Tuesday, January 29, 2019 at 10:50:58 AM UTC-8, dagmarg...@yahoo.com wrote:
Quote:
FWIW--I was using various programs--MSPaint, OpenOffice Draw--
late last night trying to draw a block diagram for a new
system. But I was spending hours fighting lame limitations
and quirks with each program, and the result was rotten &
ugly.

I formerly used CorelDraw for this sort of work, but Windows'
'progress' has finally broken my tried-and-true friend. So
last night I PayPal'd ~$50US for S-Plan7.0 over at
ABACOM-online.de, and was up and running in ten minutes. No
kidding.

It's meant as a schematic-drawing program, but it's quite good
for block diagrams, too.

Some of the main advantages for drawing block diagrams were that
it has built-in easy snap-to-grid, reasonable defaults that closely
match the task, and super fast, low-click access to adjusting line
widths, adding text, zooming in and out, etc.

Anti-bloatware, light & fast. 5MB, had it within two minutes of
check-out, installed in two minutes more. Superb.

It's just for /drawing/ schematics. It doesn't put out netlists,
it doesn't interface with any other CAD program, it's just for
preparing schematic artwork. (It will, however, output a BOM.)

SPRINT LAYOUT
I've used and recommended their PCB layout program, Sprint
Layout, for years. That too is just an artwork /drawing/
program that lets you put pads and edit traces wherever you
want, super-easily, and super-quickly. Think "tape-and-mylar,"
but quickly, on a computer.

Sprint Layout doesn't use or accept netlists, that's up to you,
but I haven't found it to matter. You can click on pins you
intend to connect, and Sprint Layout will put up a "rubber band"
trace until you've routed it--that's handy. Four-layers, max. I
use Sprint Layout to design quickie prototypes and for doing
preliminary parts-placements. It has more than earned its keep.


That's cool. Does it output EPS or PS?

BTW, the newest Microsoft Office (365) will no longer allow insertion of EPS files. Kinda lame. One has to use an old version. I don't know of a substitute way to get pictures with searchable text into a DOCX or PDF.

John Larkin
Guest

Mon Feb 04, 2019 7:45 pm   



On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 17:49:07 -0800 (PST), Simon S Aysdie
<gwhite_at_ti.com> wrote:

Quote:
On Tuesday, January 29, 2019 at 10:50:58 AM UTC-8, dagmarg...@yahoo.com wrote:
FWIW--I was using various programs--MSPaint, OpenOffice Draw--
late last night trying to draw a block diagram for a new
system. But I was spending hours fighting lame limitations
and quirks with each program, and the result was rotten &
ugly.

I formerly used CorelDraw for this sort of work, but Windows'
'progress' has finally broken my tried-and-true friend. So
last night I PayPal'd ~$50US for S-Plan7.0 over at
ABACOM-online.de, and was up and running in ten minutes. No
kidding.

It's meant as a schematic-drawing program, but it's quite good
for block diagrams, too.

Some of the main advantages for drawing block diagrams were that
it has built-in easy snap-to-grid, reasonable defaults that closely
match the task, and super fast, low-click access to adjusting line
widths, adding text, zooming in and out, etc.

Anti-bloatware, light & fast. 5MB, had it within two minutes of
check-out, installed in two minutes more. Superb.

It's just for /drawing/ schematics. It doesn't put out netlists,
it doesn't interface with any other CAD program, it's just for
preparing schematic artwork. (It will, however, output a BOM.)

SPRINT LAYOUT
I've used and recommended their PCB layout program, Sprint
Layout, for years. That too is just an artwork /drawing/
program that lets you put pads and edit traces wherever you
want, super-easily, and super-quickly. Think "tape-and-mylar,"
but quickly, on a computer.

Sprint Layout doesn't use or accept netlists, that's up to you,
but I haven't found it to matter. You can click on pins you
intend to connect, and Sprint Layout will put up a "rubber band"
trace until you've routed it--that's handy. Four-layers, max. I
use Sprint Layout to design quickie prototypes and for doing
preliminary parts-placements. It has more than earned its keep.


That's cool. Does it output EPS or PS?

BTW, the newest Microsoft Office (365) will no longer allow insertion of EPS files. Kinda lame. One has to use an old version. I don't know of a substitute way to get pictures with searchable text into a DOCX or PDF.


Pity. EPS does nice line work in a doc, much better than jpegs or
tiffs.

Microsoft keeps breaking things.

What happens if 365 opens an old doc that includes an EPS image?


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc
picosecond timing precision measurement

jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com
http://www.highlandtechnology.com

Simon S Aysdie
Guest

Mon Feb 04, 2019 8:45 pm   



On Monday, February 4, 2019 at 10:35:52 AM UTC-8, John Larkin wrote:
Quote:
On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 17:49:07 -0800 (PST), Simon S Aysdie
gwhite_at_ti.com> wrote:

On Tuesday, January 29, 2019 at 10:50:58 AM UTC-8, dagmarg...@yahoo.com wrote:
FWIW--I was using various programs--MSPaint, OpenOffice Draw--
late last night trying to draw a block diagram for a new
system. But I was spending hours fighting lame limitations
and quirks with each program, and the result was rotten &
ugly.

I formerly used CorelDraw for this sort of work, but Windows'
'progress' has finally broken my tried-and-true friend. So
last night I PayPal'd ~$50US for S-Plan7.0 over at
ABACOM-online.de, and was up and running in ten minutes. No
kidding.

It's meant as a schematic-drawing program, but it's quite good
for block diagrams, too.

Some of the main advantages for drawing block diagrams were that
it has built-in easy snap-to-grid, reasonable defaults that closely
match the task, and super fast, low-click access to adjusting line
widths, adding text, zooming in and out, etc.

Anti-bloatware, light & fast. 5MB, had it within two minutes of
check-out, installed in two minutes more. Superb.

It's just for /drawing/ schematics. It doesn't put out netlists,
it doesn't interface with any other CAD program, it's just for
preparing schematic artwork. (It will, however, output a BOM.)

SPRINT LAYOUT
I've used and recommended their PCB layout program, Sprint
Layout, for years. That too is just an artwork /drawing/
program that lets you put pads and edit traces wherever you
want, super-easily, and super-quickly. Think "tape-and-mylar,"
but quickly, on a computer.

Sprint Layout doesn't use or accept netlists, that's up to you,
but I haven't found it to matter. You can click on pins you
intend to connect, and Sprint Layout will put up a "rubber band"
trace until you've routed it--that's handy. Four-layers, max. I
use Sprint Layout to design quickie prototypes and for doing
preliminary parts-placements. It has more than earned its keep.


That's cool. Does it output EPS or PS?

BTW, the newest Microsoft Office (365) will no longer allow insertion of EPS files. Kinda lame. One has to use an old version. I don't know of a substitute way to get pictures with searchable text into a DOCX or PDF.

Pity. EPS does nice line work in a doc, much better than jpegs or
tiffs.

Microsoft keeps breaking things.

What happens if 365 opens an old doc that includes an EPS image?


I am pretty sure that old ones are grandfathered in. You just can't put new ones in. You'll notice on the drop down list of file (extension) types for "insert picture," that EPS is no longer there.

Besides searchable text, EPS also provided zero data loss if you really want it for any plot data. Of course, that could mean you're embedding a "ton" of data into the plot, and thus in turn the document you insert the EPS into. (I think the way to solve that is to compress it by your own method before creating the EPS.)

I like the EPS format mainly because it is (1) infinitely zoom-able with no pixelation, text or data, and (2) the aforementioned searchable text embedded in "pictures."

I am still using XCircuit-3.8 to get EPS schematics for insertion into documents. They look wonderful, but XCircuit is a bit clunky to use---I am always looking for alternatives. To use the latest Word, now it means convert to SVG and lose the text searchability. I do use LaTex occasionally. I guess that is the tool to use for professional looking documents.

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