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Guest

Fri Apr 12, 2013 12:19 am   



I have a Hougen Magnetic Drill that is not working.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/Hougen3_zpse1f7add1.jpg

The Magnet itself seems to work, but the drill portion doesn't. Not counting when it turned on a couple of times two days ago, making me think that there was a possible intermittent break somewhere in the connections.

I opened it up and tinkered with the safety switch adjustment screw, but that wasn't the problem.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenSafetySwitchAdjustmentScrew_zpsf865d83a.jpg

The safety switch is located on the bottom of the drill. The bottom of the drill must be flat against the metal surface in order for the drill to power on. (See the two buttons at the bottom):
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenBottom-SafetySwitch_zps3e32a032.jpg

The third button in the center is I believe also a safety switch that will cut power to the motor if the drill's magnetic base drifts as much as 1/2".

I assumed that there is nothing wrong with the AC cord because the magnet portion works, so using my Fluke 79III multimeter on the Ohm setting I tested the start and the stop buttons. There was activity on the Multimeter's display screen when I press either, so I assume that there is no break, at least as far as where those leads connect to the circuit board.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenStart-StopConnectors_zps3495c450.jpg

Would it be plausible to re-flow the solder on the circuit board in case there is a cold solder joint somewhere?

I can't travel several hours round trip to spend $65 an hour at an authorized repair location, so any advice on how to proceed would be appreciated.

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Fri Apr 12, 2013 1:12 am   



On Thu, 11 Apr 2013 15:19:43 -0700 (PDT), Searcher7_at_mail.con2.com
wrote:

Quote:
I have a Hougen Magnetic Drill that is not working.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/Hougen3_zpse1f7add1.jpg
(...)
Would it be plausible to re-flow the solder on the circuit board in case there is a cold solder joint somewhere?

Yes. Take a photograph of the various plugs so that you can put it
back together correctly. Unplug everything. Wiggle the connectors
and you'll probably find the "cold" solder joint. Reflow the solder
connections using the same type of solder that was originally used
(Lead-Tin or RoHS type). Clean off the flux. If you try to solder it
with the connectors plugged in, you'll either solder the connectors
together, or melt the plastic insulators. Also, look for "insulation
crimps" on the wire plug ends.

However, I don't think that's the problem. My crystal ball suggests
that the brushes on the motor may be the culprit. Try using your ohms
guesser on the brush contacts and see if the motor presents a few
ohms. Also spin the drive shaft to see if you don't have an "flat
spots" on the commutator. Of course, visually inspect the brushes.

If that looks ok, it's probably something between the power and the
drill motor, which is infested with interlock switches. Each should
be checked individually with the ohms guesser for continuity.

Incidentally, I failed to find a schematic or wiring diagram online.

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Fri Apr 12, 2013 1:26 am   



On Thu, 11 Apr 2013 18:12:39 -0700, Jeff Liebermann <jeffl_at_cruzio.com>
wrote:

Quote:
Incidentally, I failed to find a schematic or wiring diagram online.

I found the shop manual. It shows the PCB details but no schematic.
Check if it's wired correctly.
<http://www.hougen.com/downloads/drill_pdf/904/OM9041208.pdf>

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

Wild_Bill
Guest

Fri Apr 12, 2013 6:40 am   



I believe Jeff is steering you in the right direction. Worn brushes and
weakened brush springs can lead to intermittent/no contact between the
brushes and the commutator bars.
With something softer than a hammer head (block of wood for example) tap on
the left side, then the right side of the drill motor housing near the top,
tryinng to power the drill after each side is tapped.
If this method results in the motor running, it's liely that the brushes and
springs may need replaced, but cleaning the brush holders may allow
sufficient brush contact.. but the parts may still be required for a proper
repair.

When removing brushes, it's a good practice to keep them apart so they can
be put back in the holder they came out of.. and also to scratch a small
mark on a long side of the brush to indicate the top or end of the motor so
they can be put back in the correct orientation.

Aside from loose connections or brush problems, it appears as though the
motor is turned on/off by a relay on the circuit board. A click noise mat be
noticeable when the start-stop buttons are pressed.
Checking for correct operation of the relay can be performed a couple of
different ways.. definitely check it with the power cord unplugged if you
aren't familiar with working on powered equipment.
If the relay doesn't appear to be reacting to the start-stop buttons, it may
be faulty. If you can desolder the relay to remove it from the board, it can
be checked out-of-circuit with an ohm meter and small power supply or
magnet.

For testing with power applied, only if one is experienced and familiar with
safe testing methods.. using a 120V light bulb instead of the motor,
connected to the circuit board motor leads would allow the relay check to be
performed without the additional concern regarding rotating parts during
testing.

--
Cheers,
WB
..............


<Searcher7_at_mail.con2.com> wrote in message
news:b6a39b1a-e9a9-49fb-ad0d-1a3d33b3e5f9_at_googlegroups.com...
I have a Hougen Magnetic Drill that is not working.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/Hougen3_zpse1f7add1.jpg

The Magnet itself seems to work, but the drill portion doesn't. Not counting
when it turned on a couple of times two days ago, making me think that there
was a possible intermittent break somewhere in the connections.

I opened it up and tinkered with the safety switch adjustment screw, but
that wasn't the problem.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenSafetySwitchAdjustmentScrew_zpsf865d83a.jpg

The safety switch is located on the bottom of the drill. The bottom of the
drill must be flat against the metal surface in order for the drill to power
on. (See the two buttons at the bottom):
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenBottom-SafetySwitch_zps3e32a032.jpg

The third button in the center is I believe also a safety switch that will
cut power to the motor if the drill's magnetic base drifts as much as 1/2".

I assumed that there is nothing wrong with the AC cord because the magnet
portion works, so using my Fluke 79III multimeter on the Ohm setting I
tested the start and the stop buttons. There was activity on the
Multimeter's display screen when I press either, so I assume that there is
no break, at least as far as where those leads connect to the circuit board.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenStart-StopConnectors_zps3495c450.jpg

Would it be plausible to re-flow the solder on the circuit board in case
there is a cold solder joint somewhere?

I can't travel several hours round trip to spend $65 an hour at an
authorized repair location, so any advice on how to proceed would be
appreciated.

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

N_Cook
Guest

Fri Apr 12, 2013 7:25 am   



<Searcher7_at_mail.con2.com> wrote in message
news:b6a39b1a-e9a9-49fb-ad0d-1a3d33b3e5f9_at_googlegroups.com...
I have a Hougen Magnetic Drill that is not working.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/Hougen3_zpse1f
7add1.jpg

The Magnet itself seems to work, but the drill portion doesn't. Not counting
when it turned on a couple of times two days ago, making me think that there
was a possible intermittent break somewhere in the connections.

I opened it up and tinkered with the safety switch adjustment screw, but
that wasn't the problem.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenSafetySw
itchAdjustmentScrew_zpsf865d83a.jpg

The safety switch is located on the bottom of the drill. The bottom of the
drill must be flat against the metal surface in order for the drill to power
on. (See the two buttons at the bottom):
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenBottom-S
afetySwitch_zps3e32a032.jpg

The third button in the center is I believe also a safety switch that will
cut power to the motor if the drill's magnetic base drifts as much as 1/2".

I assumed that there is nothing wrong with the AC cord because the magnet
portion works, so using my Fluke 79III multimeter on the Ohm setting I
tested the start and the stop buttons. There was activity on the
Multimeter's display screen when I press either, so I assume that there is
no break, at least as far as where those leads connect to the circuit board.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenStart-St
opConnectors_zps3495c450.jpg

Would it be plausible to re-flow the solder on the circuit board in case
there is a cold solder joint somewhere?

I can't travel several hours round trip to spend $65 an hour at an
authorized repair location, so any advice on how to proceed would be
appreciated.

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

+++++

'scuse my ingnorance , but
do the magnets in the base really hold the drill static on to sheet steel,
opposing all the reactive torques and forces of large cutting bits?

Michael A. Terrell
Guest

Fri Apr 12, 2013 12:35 pm   



Searcher7_at_mail.con2.com wrote:
Quote:

I have a Hougen Magnetic Drill that is not working.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/Hougen3_zpse1f7add1.jpg

The Magnet itself seems to work, but the drill portion doesn't. Not counting when it turned on a couple of times two days ago, making me think that there was a possible intermittent break somewhere in the connections.

I opened it up and tinkered with the safety switch adjustment screw, but that wasn't the problem.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenSafetySwitchAdjustmentScrew_zpsf865d83a.jpg

The safety switch is located on the bottom of the drill. The bottom of the drill must be flat against the metal surface in order for the drill to power on. (See the two buttons at the bottom):
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenBottom-SafetySwitch_zps3e32a032.jpg

The third button in the center is I believe also a safety switch that will cut power to the motor if the drill's magnetic base drifts as much as 1/2".

I assumed that there is nothing wrong with the AC cord because the magnet portion works, so using my Fluke 79III multimeter on the Ohm setting I tested the start and the stop buttons. There was activity on the Multimeter's display screen when I press either, so I assume that there is no break, at least as far as where those leads connect to the circuit board.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenStart-StopConnectors_zps3495c450.jpg

Would it be plausible to re-flow the solder on the circuit board in case there is a cold solder joint somewhere?

I can't travel several hours round trip to spend $65 an hour at an authorized repair location, so any advice on how to proceed would be appreciated.

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.


Have you asked on news:rec.crafts.metalworking where there are a
number of people who own these tools?

Rheilly Phoull
Guest

Fri Apr 12, 2013 11:38 pm   



On 12/04/13 15:25, N_Cook wrote:
Quote:
Searcher7_at_mail.con2.com> wrote in message
news:b6a39b1a-e9a9-49fb-ad0d-1a3d33b3e5f9_at_googlegroups.com...
I have a Hougen Magnetic Drill that is not working.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/Hougen3_zpse1f
7add1.jpg

The Magnet itself seems to work, but the drill portion doesn't. Not counting
when it turned on a couple of times two days ago, making me think that there
was a possible intermittent break somewhere in the connections.

I opened it up and tinkered with the safety switch adjustment screw, but
that wasn't the problem.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenSafetySw
itchAdjustmentScrew_zpsf865d83a.jpg

The safety switch is located on the bottom of the drill. The bottom of the
drill must be flat against the metal surface in order for the drill to power
on. (See the two buttons at the bottom):
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenBottom-S
afetySwitch_zps3e32a032.jpg

The third button in the center is I believe also a safety switch that will
cut power to the motor if the drill's magnetic base drifts as much as 1/2".

I assumed that there is nothing wrong with the AC cord because the magnet
portion works, so using my Fluke 79III multimeter on the Ohm setting I
tested the start and the stop buttons. There was activity on the
Multimeter's display screen when I press either, so I assume that there is
no break, at least as far as where those leads connect to the circuit board.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenStart-St
opConnectors_zps3495c450.jpg

Would it be plausible to re-flow the solder on the circuit board in case
there is a cold solder joint somewhere?

I can't travel several hours round trip to spend $65 an hour at an
authorized repair location, so any advice on how to proceed would be
appreciated.

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

+++++

'scuse my ingnorance , but
do the magnets in the base really hold the drill static on to sheet steel,
opposing all the reactive torques and forces of large cutting bits?


Yup, they surely do !! Widely used in construction work in my day

(palentonic Smile .

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Sat Apr 13, 2013 5:52 am   



On Thu, 11 Apr 2013 18:26:04 -0700, Jeff Liebermann <jeffl_at_cruzio.com>
wrote:

Quote:
On Thu, 11 Apr 2013 18:12:39 -0700, Jeff Liebermann <jeffl_at_cruzio.com
wrote:

Incidentally, I failed to find a schematic or wiring diagram online.

I found the shop manual. It shows the PCB details but no schematic.
Check if it's wired correctly.
http://www.hougen.com/downloads/drill_pdf/904/OM9041208.pdf

Some photos of a similar drill, in case the wiring isn't clear.
(What a mess):
<http://www.compusyssolutions.com/2011/04/hougen-power-feed-magnetic-drill/>

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Sat Apr 13, 2013 6:09 am   



On Fri, 12 Apr 2013 08:25:48 +0100, "N_Cook" <diverse_at_tcp.co.uk>
wrote:

Quote:
'scuse my ingnorance , but
do the magnets in the base really hold the drill static on to sheet steel,
opposing all the reactive torques and forces of large cutting bits?

Lots of videos showing such drills in action on YouTube:
<https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=hougen+magnetic+drill>
If for some reason, the magentic base disconnects from the base metal
being drilled, a lift interlock switch will kill the power to the
drill motor. The usual mistake is to leave some chips or debris
between the magnetic base and the base metal.





--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558


Guest

Sun Apr 14, 2013 9:17 pm   



On Thursday, April 11, 2013 9:12:39 PM UTC-4, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
Quote:
On Thu, 11 Apr 2013 15:19:43 -0700 (PDT), Searcher7_at_mail.con2.com

wrote:



I have a Hougen Magnetic Drill that is not working.

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/Hougen3_zpse1f7add1.jpg

(...)

Would it be plausible to re-flow the solder on the circuit board in case there is a cold solder joint somewhere?



Yes. Take a photograph of the various plugs so that you can put it

back together correctly. Unplug everything. Wiggle the connectors

and you'll probably find the "cold" solder joint. Reflow the solder

connections using the same type of solder that was originally used

(Lead-Tin or RoHS type). Clean off the flux. If you try to solder it

with the connectors plugged in, you'll either solder the connectors

together, or melt the plastic insulators. Also, look for "insulation

crimps" on the wire plug ends.



However, I don't think that's the problem. My crystal ball suggests

that the brushes on the motor may be the culprit. Try using your ohms

guesser on the brush contacts and see if the motor presents a few

ohms. Also spin the drive shaft to see if you don't have an "flat

spots" on the commutator. Of course, visually inspect the brushes.



If that looks ok, it's probably something between the power and the

drill motor, which is infested with interlock switches. Each should

be checked individually with the ohms guesser for continuity.



Incidentally, I failed to find a schematic or wiring diagram online.



--

Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com

150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com

Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com

Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

Here are the Manuals for my model:
http://www.hougen.com/downloads/10904.pdf
http://www.hougen.com/downloads/misc_pdf/05346_Retro_Kit_Instructions.pdf
http://www.hougen.com/downloads/misc_pdf/02224_904threaded_spind.pdf

After taking out the screws I couldn't figure out how to separate the motor housing from the slide. (I tried using a rubber mallet to knock it loose). But I unscrewed the top plate and saw where the brushes were located and then got to them by unscrewing the small circular plastic covers at opposite sides near the top of the drill housing.

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenMotorBrushes_zps466ba0d6.jpg

How do I know they are still good? (The rectangular brushes are about 1/2" x 5/8" x 3/16").

Anyway, I put the drill back together and while progressively manipulating the safety switch adjustment between power up tries I got to the point where the drill would turn on, which it wouldn't do before.

So I'm still at a loss as to what the problem was. I probably didn't re-insert the brushes *exactly* the way I took them out and was wondering if that might be the reason it is working now.

What other procedures should I undertake before I start re-flowing solder on the control PCB? (Since I have to sell the drill I want to be sure it is working properly). Can anyone tell me where I can find new brushes?

Thanks a lot.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.


Guest

Sun Apr 14, 2013 9:22 pm   



On Friday, April 12, 2013 2:40:52 AM UTC-4, Wild_Bill wrote:
Quote:
I believe Jeff is steering you in the right direction. Worn brushes and

weakened brush springs can lead to intermittent/no contact between the

brushes and the commutator bars.

With something softer than a hammer head (block of wood for example) tap on

the left side, then the right side of the drill motor housing near the top,

tryinng to power the drill after each side is tapped.

If this method results in the motor running, it's liely that the brushes and

springs may need replaced, but cleaning the brush holders may allow

sufficient brush contact.. but the parts may still be required for a proper

repair.



When removing brushes, it's a good practice to keep them apart so they can

be put back in the holder they came out of.. and also to scratch a small

mark on a long side of the brush to indicate the top or end of the motor so

they can be put back in the correct orientation.



Aside from loose connections or brush problems, it appears as though the

motor is turned on/off by a relay on the circuit board. A click noise mat be

noticeable when the start-stop buttons are pressed.

Checking for correct operation of the relay can be performed a couple of

different ways.. definitely check it with the power cord unplugged if you

aren't familiar with working on powered equipment.

If the relay doesn't appear to be reacting to the start-stop buttons, it may

be faulty. If you can desolder the relay to remove it from the board, it can

be checked out-of-circuit with an ohm meter and small power supply or

magnet.



For testing with power applied, only if one is experienced and familiar with

safe testing methods.. using a 120V light bulb instead of the motor,

connected to the circuit board motor leads would allow the relay check to be

performed without the additional concern regarding rotating parts during

testing.



--

Cheers,

WB

.............





Searcher7_at_mail.con2.com> wrote in message

news:b6a39b1a-e9a9-49fb-ad0d-1a3d33b3e5f9_at_googlegroups.com...

I have a Hougen Magnetic Drill that is not working.

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/Hougen3_zpse1f7add1.jpg



The Magnet itself seems to work, but the drill portion doesn't. Not counting

when it turned on a couple of times two days ago, making me think that there

was a possible intermittent break somewhere in the connections.



I opened it up and tinkered with the safety switch adjustment screw, but

that wasn't the problem.

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenSafetySwitchAdjustmentScrew_zpsf865d83a.jpg



The safety switch is located on the bottom of the drill. The bottom of the

drill must be flat against the metal surface in order for the drill to power

on. (See the two buttons at the bottom):

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenBottom-SafetySwitch_zps3e32a032.jpg



The third button in the center is I believe also a safety switch that will

cut power to the motor if the drill's magnetic base drifts as much as 1/2".



I assumed that there is nothing wrong with the AC cord because the magnet

portion works, so using my Fluke 79III multimeter on the Ohm setting I

tested the start and the stop buttons. There was activity on the

Multimeter's display screen when I press either, so I assume that there is

no break, at least as far as where those leads connect to the circuit board.

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenStart-StopConnectors_zps3495c450.jpg



Would it be plausible to re-flow the solder on the circuit board in case

there is a cold solder joint somewhere?



I can't travel several hours round trip to spend $65 an hour at an

authorized repair location, so any advice on how to proceed would be

appreciated.



Thanks.



Darren Harris

Staten Island, New York.

I did replace the brushes in the same holders they came out of, but *may* have put one or both back in upside down from how they came out.

Also,I only use my multimeters for the basics and don't really know their functions in depth. So I can only note whether or not the display changes and the number read-outs. But not necessarily what they mean unless I'm just measuring AC or DC voltage or something like that.

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.


Guest

Sun Apr 14, 2013 9:24 pm   



On Friday, April 12, 2013 8:35:04 AM UTC-4, Michael Terrell wrote:
Quote:
Searcher7_at_mail.con2.com wrote:



I have a Hougen Magnetic Drill that is not working.

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/Hougen3_zpse1f7add1.jpg



The Magnet itself seems to work, but the drill portion doesn't. Not counting when it turned on a couple of times two days ago, making me think that there was a possible intermittent break somewhere in the connections.



I opened it up and tinkered with the safety switch adjustment screw, but that wasn't the problem.

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenSafetySwitchAdjustmentScrew_zpsf865d83a.jpg



The safety switch is located on the bottom of the drill. The bottom of the drill must be flat against the metal surface in order for the drill to power on. (See the two buttons at the bottom):

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenBottom-SafetySwitch_zps3e32a032.jpg



The third button in the center is I believe also a safety switch that will cut power to the motor if the drill's magnetic base drifts as much as 1/2".



I assumed that there is nothing wrong with the AC cord because the magnet portion works, so using my Fluke 79III multimeter on the Ohm setting I tested the start and the stop buttons. There was activity on the Multimeter's display screen when I press either, so I assume that there is no break, at least as far as where those leads connect to the circuit board.

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenStart-StopConnectors_zps3495c450.jpg



Would it be plausible to re-flow the solder on the circuit board in case there is a cold solder joint somewhere?



I can't travel several hours round trip to spend $65 an hour at an authorized repair location, so any advice on how to proceed would be appreciated.



Thanks.



Darren Harris

Staten Island, New York.





Have you asked on news:rec.crafts.metalworking where there are a

number of people who own these tools?

Yes. And I didn't receive a single response, which is why I posted here. :-)

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Mon Apr 15, 2013 3:31 am   



On Sun, 14 Apr 2013 12:17:03 -0700 (PDT), Searcher7_at_mail.con2.com
wrote:

Quote:

(...)

Quote:
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenMotorBrushes_zps466ba0d6.jpg
How do I know they are still good? (The rectangular brushes are about 1/2" x 5/8" x 3/16").

They look good, except for the left brush, which looks a little
chipped. Shake out the debris from the motor, and put the brushes
back exactly the way they came out. Then, put an ohms guesser between
the brush contacts. Leave the insulating caps off, compress the
springs with the ohms guesser probes, and measure the resistance. I
don't know exactly what resistance to expect, but my guess is
somewhere between 2 and 5 ohms. (I can measure a similar drill
tomorrow if you want). What I'm looking for is a resistance that is
much higher than the 2-5 ohms, which would indicate an open in the
rotor or stator windings.

Quote:
Anyway, I put the drill back together and while progressively manipulating
the safety switch adjustment between power up tries I got to the point
where the drill would turn on, which it wouldn't do before.

Progress, I guess. Now you have an intermittent drill, instead of a
repaired drill. You should spend the time finding the culprit. The
cracked edge of the brush is an important clue. If the broken piece
somehow got wedged between the brush and the commutator, that would
produce a no motor run situation. Look for a corresponding gouge in
the commutator and clean all the junk out of the motor with an air
hose. Watch out not to get anything wedged between the outside of the
rotor and the stator. If there's some magnetized junk in there, make
a cardboard shim and push it out.

Quote:
So I'm still at a loss as to what the problem was. I probably didn't
re-insert the brushes *exactly* the way I took them out and was
wondering if that might be the reason it is working now.

I'm about 80% sure that it's somehow related to the brushed. If you
put them back differently from where they were extracted, you run the
risk of either gouging the commutator, or wearing down the brushes
prematurely.

Quote:
What other procedures should I undertake before I start re-flowing
solder on the control PCB? (Since I have to sell the drill I want
to be sure it is working properly).

Take digital photos so that you can put the mess of wires back
together.

Important: Looking at the age, my guess(tm) is that it's Lead-Tin
60/40 solder, and not the RoHS crap. Try a small piece of Lead-Tin on
a solder pad. If it turns dull gray and rough looking, it's the wrong
solder. It should be fairly smooth, shiny, and of course, strong when
done.

I can't tell for sure from the photos or manuals, but there appears to
be a relay in the circuit. If so, the contacts should be inspected
and possibly burnished. If severely pitted, replace the relay.

Quote:
Can anyone tell me where I can find new brushes?

Google for "hougen 17621 carbon brush set"
<http://etoolinc.com/p10267/Hougen-17621-BRUSH,-CARBON-%28PAIR%29/product_info.html>
Please verify that the 17621 is the correct brush set for your drill.

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

Wild_Bill
Guest

Mon Apr 15, 2013 6:06 am   



The picture of the brush/spring assemblies shows that they appear to be
normal.. although the length of the original/new brushes is unknown.

When putting the brushes back in the holders, if there was adequate length
that caused some slight contact pressure (spring sticking out when brush is
fully inserted), then the brushes should be long enough to operate the
motor.

Dust and debris in and around the brush holders should be removed as a
standard practice when servicing motors.

The brush on the left in the picture appears to have been arcing, probably
on the trailing edge.
If the brush/commutator contact area is visible from the outside, see if
there is a lot more arcing at one brush than there is at the other.

Since the brushes may not be installed in their original positions now, by
viewing the normal rotational direction of the armature (by running the
motor or by turning the tool's spindle in the proper direction) it should be
possible to remount that chipped brush in it's original position with the
dark/chipped edge as the trailing edge.

Brushes in power tools don't usually contact the commutator at precisely 90
degrees, so the concave area is normally off-center on the brush (since the
brushes tend to drift in the direction of rotation). That may help finding
the original position of the brushes.

I've seen motor troubleshooting web pages showing brush defect pictures,
arcing illustrations and corresponding faults, but can't seem to find a
decent one now.
Maybe someone else has a saved location they could recommend.

There are numerous problems that are indicated by excessive brush arcing,
chipping/erosion or pitting. Several faults can only be confirmed by a motor
repair shop or a knowlegeable tech with a motor growler and other test
equipment.

It may be worthwhile to closely examine the board soldering with good light
and a magnifier, and touch-up/reflow any cracked or abnormal looking joints.
I regularly use lead solder to reflow lead-free solder because it produces
reliable connections.

I'm not a manufacturer, distributor or exporter and I have composed a sworn
statement stating that I will not eat or snort any of my electronic gear.
Let the recycler sort it out.

--
Cheers,
WB
..............


<Searcher7_at_mail.con2.com> wrote in message
news:12c89036-03fa-4e24-8ce7-d411df99b1cf_at_googlegroups.com...

I did replace the brushes in the same holders they came out of, but *may*
have put one or both back in upside down from how they came out.

Also,I only use my multimeters for the basics and don't really know their
functions in depth. So I can only note whether or not the display changes
and the number read-outs. But not necessarily what they mean unless I'm just
measuring AC or DC voltage or something like that.

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.


Guest

Thu May 02, 2013 6:29 pm   



On Sunday, April 14, 2013 3:24:19 PM UTC-4, sear...@mail.con2.com wrote:
Quote:
On Friday, April 12, 2013 8:35:04 AM UTC-4, Michael Terrell wrote: > Searcher7_at_mail.con2.com wrote: > > > > > > I have a Hougen Magnetic Drill that is not working. > > > http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/Hougen3_zpse1f7add1.jpg > > > > > > The Magnet itself seems to work, but the drill portion doesn't. Not counting when it turned on a couple of times two days ago, making me think that there was a possible intermittent break somewhere in the connections. > > > > > > I opened it up and tinkered with the safety switch adjustment screw, but that wasn't the problem. > > > http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenSafetySwitchAdjustmentScrew_zpsf865d83a.jpg > > > > > > The safety switch is located on the bottom of the drill. The bottom of the drill must be flat against the metal surface in order for the drill to power on. (See the two buttons at the bottom): > > > http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenBottom-SafetySwitch_zps3e32a032.jpg > > > > > > The third button in the center is I believe also a safety switch that will cut power to the motor if the drill's magnetic base drifts as much as 1/2". > > > > > > I assumed that there is nothing wrong with the AC cord because the magnet portion works, so using my Fluke 79III multimeter on the Ohm setting I tested the start and the stop buttons. There was activity on the Multimeter's display screen when I press either, so I assume that there is no break, at least as far as where those leads connect to the circuit board. > > > http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Tools/HougenStart-StopConnectors_zps3495c450.jpg > > > > > > Would it be plausible to re-flow the solder on the circuit board in case there is a cold solder joint somewhere? > > > > > > I can't travel several hours round trip to spend $65 an hour at an authorized repair location, so any advice on how to proceed would be appreciated. > > > > > > Thanks. > > > > > > Darren Harris > > > Staten Island, New York. > > > > > > Have you asked on news:rec.crafts.metalworking where there are a > > number of people who own these tools? Yes. And I didn't receive a single response, which is why I posted here. Smile Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.

I turned it on and wacked it a few times with a rubber mallet over the course of a week and it worked every time.

So I guess it is ok for now. At least I'll know what to do the next time something like this happens.

Thanks a lot.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

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