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Peter Percival
Guest

Mon Jul 15, 2019 3:45 pm   



I'd like to buy a frequency counter but I was afraid they'd cost
thousands. Apparently, "only" hundreds -
https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/products/6654919/?tpr=2. Any
recommendations?

--
"He who will not reason is a bigot;
he who cannot is a fool;
he who dares not is a slave."
- Sir William Drummond

Tom Gardner
Guest

Mon Jul 15, 2019 4:45 pm   



On 15/07/19 15:33, Peter Percival wrote:
Quote:
I'd like to buy a frequency counter but I was afraid they'd cost thousands.
Apparently, "only" hundreds -
https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/products/6654919/?tpr=2.  Any recommendations?


Yes.

Work out what you want to achieve, and only then work out
how to achieve it. Frequency counters are nice for timenuts
but nowadays different instruments are often better.

Peter Percival
Guest

Mon Jul 15, 2019 4:45 pm   



Tom Gardner wrote:
Quote:
On 15/07/19 15:33, Peter Percival wrote:
I'd like to buy a frequency counter but I was afraid they'd cost
thousands. Apparently, "only" hundreds -
https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/products/6654919/?tpr=2.  Any
recommendations?

Yes.

Work out what you want to achieve, and only then work out
how to achieve it. Frequency counters are nice for timenuts
but nowadays different instruments are often better.


Which? What I want to do is measure frequencies of electrical signals
ranging from 1Hz (or less) to mega Hz.



--
"He who will not reason is a bigot;
he who cannot is a fool;
he who dares not is a slave."
- Sir William Drummond

Tom Gardner
Guest

Mon Jul 15, 2019 4:45 pm   



On 15/07/19 16:00, Peter Percival wrote:
Quote:
Tom Gardner wrote:
On 15/07/19 15:33, Peter Percival wrote:
I'd like to buy a frequency counter but I was afraid they'd cost thousands.
Apparently, "only" hundreds -
https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/products/6654919/?tpr=2.  Any recommendations?

Yes.

Work out what you want to achieve, and only then work out
how to achieve it. Frequency counters are nice for timenuts
but nowadays different instruments are often better.

Which?  What I want to do is measure frequencies of electrical signals ranging
from 1Hz (or less) to mega Hz.


Ah, so you are a timenut, who wants to measure a static
frequency as an end in itself. That's OK.

Now you have to decide the precision and accuracy you need.

default
Guest

Mon Jul 15, 2019 4:45 pm   



On Mon, 15 Jul 2019 16:00:06 +0100, Peter Percival
<peterxpercival_at_hotmail.com> wrote:

Quote:
Tom Gardner wrote:
On 15/07/19 15:33, Peter Percival wrote:
I'd like to buy a frequency counter but I was afraid they'd cost
thousands. Apparently, "only" hundreds -
https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/products/6654919/?tpr=2. Any
recommendations?

Yes.

Work out what you want to achieve, and only then work out
how to achieve it. Frequency counters are nice for timenuts
but nowadays different instruments are often better.

Which? What I want to do is measure frequencies of electrical signals
ranging from 1Hz (or less) to mega Hz.


I'd advise waiting. prices on digital oscilloscopes with built in
frequency counters, etc., keep dropping and without knowing what you
need it for...

BTW O'scopes can tell you frequency too, just not to the least
significant digit, and unless you're servicing radio transmitters or
clocks you don't often need LSD accuracy.

I've got an old analog O'scope and it does all the frequency
measurement I need.

Phil Hobbs
Guest

Mon Jul 15, 2019 8:45 pm   



On 7/15/19 11:43 AM, default wrote:
Quote:
On Mon, 15 Jul 2019 16:00:06 +0100, Peter Percival
peterxpercival_at_hotmail.com> wrote:

Tom Gardner wrote:
On 15/07/19 15:33, Peter Percival wrote:
I'd like to buy a frequency counter but I was afraid they'd cost
thousands. Apparently, "only" hundreds -
https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/products/6654919/?tpr=2.  Any
recommendations?

Yes.

Work out what you want to achieve, and only then work out
how to achieve it. Frequency counters are nice for timenuts
but nowadays different instruments are often better.

Which? What I want to do is measure frequencies of electrical signals
ranging from 1Hz (or less) to mega Hz.

I'd advise waiting. prices on digital oscilloscopes with built in
frequency counters, etc., keep dropping and without knowing what you
need it for...

BTW O'scopes can tell you frequency too, just not to the least
significant digit, and unless you're servicing radio transmitters or
clocks you don't often need LSD accuracy.

I've got an old analog O'scope and it does all the frequency
measurement I need.


You can get a 1-Hz to 500 MHz frequency counter module for $11 on eBay,
and there are lots of used bench models there for only a few dollars
more. Counters are pretty useful actually, for all sorts of RF work as
well as other stuff. 'tain't just time-and-frequency mavens.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

http://electrooptical.net
http://hobbs-eo.com

default
Guest

Mon Jul 15, 2019 9:45 pm   



On Mon, 15 Jul 2019 15:24:41 -0400, Phil Hobbs
<pcdhSpamMeSenseless_at_electrooptical.net> wrote:

Quote:
On 7/15/19 11:43 AM, default wrote:
On Mon, 15 Jul 2019 16:00:06 +0100, Peter Percival
peterxpercival_at_hotmail.com> wrote:

Tom Gardner wrote:
On 15/07/19 15:33, Peter Percival wrote:
I'd like to buy a frequency counter but I was afraid they'd cost
thousands. Apparently, "only" hundreds -
https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/products/6654919/?tpr=2. Any
recommendations?

Yes.

Work out what you want to achieve, and only then work out
how to achieve it. Frequency counters are nice for timenuts
but nowadays different instruments are often better.

Which? What I want to do is measure frequencies of electrical signals
ranging from 1Hz (or less) to mega Hz.

I'd advise waiting. prices on digital oscilloscopes with built in
frequency counters, etc., keep dropping and without knowing what you
need it for...

BTW O'scopes can tell you frequency too, just not to the least
significant digit, and unless you're servicing radio transmitters or
clocks you don't often need LSD accuracy.

I've got an old analog O'scope and it does all the frequency
measurement I need.


You can get a 1-Hz to 500 MHz frequency counter module for $11 on eBay,
and there are lots of used bench models there for only a few dollars
more. Counters are pretty useful actually, for all sorts of RF work as
well as other stuff. 'tain't just time-and-frequency mavens.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs


In another post he calls himself a beginner. In that context, I think
a scope is more useful (I'm assuming he already has a multimeter)

Peter Percival
Guest

Mon Jul 15, 2019 10:45 pm   



Peter Percival wrote:
Quote:
default wrote:
On Mon, 15 Jul 2019 15:24:41 -0400, Phil Hobbs
pcdhSpamMeSenseless_at_electrooptical.net> wrote:

On 7/15/19 11:43 AM, default wrote:
On Mon, 15 Jul 2019 16:00:06 +0100, Peter Percival
peterxpercival_at_hotmail.com> wrote:

Tom Gardner wrote:
On 15/07/19 15:33, Peter Percival wrote:
I'd like to buy a frequency counter but I was afraid they'd cost
thousands. Apparently, "only" hundreds -
https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/products/6654919/?tpr=2. Any
recommendations?

Yes.

Work out what you want to achieve, and only then work out
how to achieve it. Frequency counters are nice for timenuts
but nowadays different instruments are often better.

Which? What I want to do is measure frequencies of electrical signals
ranging from 1Hz (or less) to mega Hz.

I'd advise waiting. prices on digital oscilloscopes with built in
frequency counters, etc., keep dropping and without knowing what you
need it for...

BTW O'scopes can tell you frequency too, just not to the least
significant digit, and unless you're servicing radio transmitters or
clocks you don't often need LSD accuracy.

I've got an old analog O'scope and it does all the frequency
measurement I need.


You can get a 1-Hz to 500 MHz frequency counter module for $11 on eBay,
and there are lots of used bench models there for only a few dollars
more. Counters are pretty useful actually, for all sorts of RF work as
well as other stuff. 'tain't just time-and-frequency mavens.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

In another post he calls himself a beginner. In that context, I think
a scope is more useful (I'm assuming he already has a multimeter)

I have two scopes (both Heathkit) but no multimeter!


Actually, that's not true. I do have a multimeter somewhere, I just
can't remember where.


--
"He who will not reason is a bigot;
he who cannot is a fool;
he who dares not is a slave."
- Sir William Drummond

Peter Percival
Guest

Mon Jul 15, 2019 10:45 pm   



default wrote:
Quote:
On Mon, 15 Jul 2019 15:24:41 -0400, Phil Hobbs
pcdhSpamMeSenseless_at_electrooptical.net> wrote:

On 7/15/19 11:43 AM, default wrote:
On Mon, 15 Jul 2019 16:00:06 +0100, Peter Percival
peterxpercival_at_hotmail.com> wrote:

Tom Gardner wrote:
On 15/07/19 15:33, Peter Percival wrote:
I'd like to buy a frequency counter but I was afraid they'd cost
thousands. Apparently, "only" hundreds -
https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/products/6654919/?tpr=2. Any
recommendations?

Yes.

Work out what you want to achieve, and only then work out
how to achieve it. Frequency counters are nice for timenuts
but nowadays different instruments are often better.

Which? What I want to do is measure frequencies of electrical signals
ranging from 1Hz (or less) to mega Hz.

I'd advise waiting. prices on digital oscilloscopes with built in
frequency counters, etc., keep dropping and without knowing what you
need it for...

BTW O'scopes can tell you frequency too, just not to the least
significant digit, and unless you're servicing radio transmitters or
clocks you don't often need LSD accuracy.

I've got an old analog O'scope and it does all the frequency
measurement I need.


You can get a 1-Hz to 500 MHz frequency counter module for $11 on eBay,
and there are lots of used bench models there for only a few dollars
more. Counters are pretty useful actually, for all sorts of RF work as
well as other stuff. 'tain't just time-and-frequency mavens.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

In another post he calls himself a beginner. In that context, I think
a scope is more useful (I'm assuming he already has a multimeter)


I have two scopes (both Heathkit) but no multimeter!

--
"He who will not reason is a bigot;
he who cannot is a fool;
he who dares not is a slave."
- Sir William Drummond

Phil Hobbs
Guest

Tue Jul 16, 2019 12:45 am   



On 7/15/19 4:35 PM, default wrote:
Quote:
On Mon, 15 Jul 2019 15:24:41 -0400, Phil Hobbs
pcdhSpamMeSenseless_at_electrooptical.net> wrote:

On 7/15/19 11:43 AM, default wrote:
On Mon, 15 Jul 2019 16:00:06 +0100, Peter Percival
peterxpercival_at_hotmail.com> wrote:

Tom Gardner wrote:
On 15/07/19 15:33, Peter Percival wrote:
I'd like to buy a frequency counter but I was afraid they'd cost
thousands. Apparently, "only" hundreds -
https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/products/6654919/?tpr=2.  Any
recommendations?

Yes.

Work out what you want to achieve, and only then work out
how to achieve it. Frequency counters are nice for timenuts
but nowadays different instruments are often better.

Which? What I want to do is measure frequencies of electrical signals
ranging from 1Hz (or less) to mega Hz.

I'd advise waiting. prices on digital oscilloscopes with built in
frequency counters, etc., keep dropping and without knowing what you
need it for...

BTW O'scopes can tell you frequency too, just not to the least
significant digit, and unless you're servicing radio transmitters or
clocks you don't often need LSD accuracy.

I've got an old analog O'scope and it does all the frequency
measurement I need.


You can get a 1-Hz to 500 MHz frequency counter module for $11 on eBay,
and there are lots of used bench models there for only a few dollars
more. Counters are pretty useful actually, for all sorts of RF work as
well as other stuff. 'tain't just time-and-frequency mavens.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

In another post he calls himself a beginner. In that context, I think
a scope is more useful (I'm assuming he already has a multimeter)


Since they're all only a few bucks, why bother choosing? Basic test
gear (and even older top-of-the-line stuff) is so cheap at the moment
that it's a false economy not to buy lots of it.

When I was a boy, one time I saved up three weeks' allowance to buy
(drum roll) a tuning coil for an AM radio. For the same money (adjusted
for inflation since 1971-ish), today I could buy a pretty decent
frequency counter as well as all the inductors I could possibly use.

It's raining soup. Grab a bowl!

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

http://electrooptical.net
http://hobbs-eo.com

Helmut Wabnig
Guest

Tue Jul 16, 2019 9:45 am   



On Mon, 15 Jul 2019 15:33:40 +0100, Peter Percival
<peterxpercival_at_hotmail.com> wrote:

Quote:
I'd like to buy a frequency counter but I was afraid they'd cost
thousands. Apparently, "only" hundreds -
https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/products/6654919/?tpr=2. Any
recommendations?


Only 9 digits, forget it quickly.


w.

George Herold
Guest

Tue Jul 16, 2019 2:45 pm   



On Monday, July 15, 2019 at 7:21:36 PM UTC-4, Phil Hobbs wrote:
Quote:
On 7/15/19 4:35 PM, default wrote:
On Mon, 15 Jul 2019 15:24:41 -0400, Phil Hobbs
pcdhSpamMeSenseless_at_electrooptical.net> wrote:

On 7/15/19 11:43 AM, default wrote:
On Mon, 15 Jul 2019 16:00:06 +0100, Peter Percival
peterxpercival_at_hotmail.com> wrote:

Tom Gardner wrote:
On 15/07/19 15:33, Peter Percival wrote:
I'd like to buy a frequency counter but I was afraid they'd cost
thousands. Apparently, "only" hundreds -
https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/products/6654919/?tpr=2.  Any
recommendations?

Yes.

Work out what you want to achieve, and only then work out
how to achieve it. Frequency counters are nice for timenuts
but nowadays different instruments are often better.

Which? What I want to do is measure frequencies of electrical signals
ranging from 1Hz (or less) to mega Hz.

I'd advise waiting. prices on digital oscilloscopes with built in
frequency counters, etc., keep dropping and without knowing what you
need it for...

BTW O'scopes can tell you frequency too, just not to the least
significant digit, and unless you're servicing radio transmitters or
clocks you don't often need LSD accuracy.

I've got an old analog O'scope and it does all the frequency
measurement I need.


You can get a 1-Hz to 500 MHz frequency counter module for $11 on eBay,
and there are lots of used bench models there for only a few dollars
more. Counters are pretty useful actually, for all sorts of RF work as
well as other stuff. 'tain't just time-and-frequency mavens.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

In another post he calls himself a beginner. In that context, I think
a scope is more useful (I'm assuming he already has a multimeter)


Since they're all only a few bucks, why bother choosing? Basic test
gear (and even older top-of-the-line stuff) is so cheap at the moment
that it's a false economy not to buy lots of it.

When I was a boy, one time I saved up three weeks' allowance to buy
(drum roll) a tuning coil for an AM radio. For the same money (adjusted
for inflation since 1971-ish), today I could buy a pretty decent
frequency counter as well as all the inductors I could possibly use.

It's raining soup. Grab a bowl!

Grin, I've got a bunch of old frequency counters in the back. I'd ship them
out to anyone in the US for shipping costs*. I find that they sometimes
lie to you. (you can get all sorts of false counts from noise and such...
depending on where the threshold is set.) We were also using
one to count photon pulses. It did the average OK, but it got the
statistics wrong! There wasn't enough variation in the count shot to
shot.

These days I mostly just use my 'scope as a frequency counter...
good enough for most stuff.

George H.

*BK precision 1803D (200 MHz). Three in the boxes.
Quote:

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

http://electrooptical.net
http://hobbs-eo.com


Ralph Mowery
Guest

Tue Jul 16, 2019 3:45 pm   



In article <6ZGdnRTVPOjkl7DAnZ2dnUU7-LHNnZ2d_at_supernews.com>,
pcdhSpamMeSenseless_at_electrooptical.net says...
Quote:

Since they're all only a few bucks, why bother choosing? Basic test
gear (and even older top-of-the-line stuff) is so cheap at the moment
that it's a false economy not to buy lots of it.



Yes, it is. I have a couple of communications monitors that go up to
999 MHz that will do about anything you can think of. Bought used, they
were less than $ 1000, when new were close to $ 50,000.

There is no excuse not to have some kind of multimeter now. Good
digital ones can be had for about $ 20. Even the 'free' Harbor freight
meter is not too bad. I have several around the house and in the truck.
I verified the accuracy with a Fluke meter and they are not very far
off. Closer than most analog meters can be read.

Phil Allison
Guest

Tue Jul 16, 2019 3:45 pm   



Tom Gardner puked:


Quote:
Peter Percival wrote:
I'd like to buy a frequency counter but I was afraid they'd cost thousands.
Apparently, "only" hundreds -
https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/products/6654919/?tpr=2.  Any recommendations?


Yes.

Work out what you want to achieve, and only then work out
how to achieve it. Frequency counters are nice for timenuts
but nowadays different instruments are often better.



** A standard frequency counter is an indispensable piece of workshop gear.

By "standard" I mean one covering the range from 1Hz to a few hundred MHz or even 1GHz. If it will do period counting too, so much the better as it will then very accurately measure frequencies lower than 100kHz.

You can use one to calibrate other instruments like audio and RF generators or scopes. Nothing else substitutes for one.

Though I am mainly an audio tech, I use a 1GHz model to check the frequency and general operation of radio mic and RC transmitters.

My spare (40MHz) counter is permanently linked to my analogue audio generator, for fairly obvious reasons.


..... Phil

John Larkin
Guest

Tue Jul 16, 2019 4:45 pm   



On Mon, 15 Jul 2019 16:00:06 +0100, Peter Percival
<peterxpercival_at_hotmail.com> wrote:

Quote:
Tom Gardner wrote:
On 15/07/19 15:33, Peter Percival wrote:
I'd like to buy a frequency counter but I was afraid they'd cost
thousands. Apparently, "only" hundreds -
https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/products/6654919/?tpr=2. Any
recommendations?

Yes.

Work out what you want to achieve, and only then work out
how to achieve it. Frequency counters are nice for timenuts
but nowadays different instruments are often better.

Which? What I want to do is measure frequencies of electrical signals
ranging from 1Hz (or less) to mega Hz.


Lots of oscilloscopes will measure frequency pretty well too.


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics

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