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Tough Guy no. 1265
Guest

Fri Oct 30, 2015 11:10 pm   



https://www.dropbox.com/s/fy5xm8lmd3g2vdt/Circuit.jpg?dl=0&s=sl

This supply came with a 2 foot 9W strip light of LEDs. After 1 week it began flickering badly. 240V AC in on the right. The circuit outputs 75V DC on the left, with a 3.5V AC ripple on it (with the 100uF capacitor included, which I verified is ok). With a 680uF capacitor in its place, there is no visible flicker.

What's likely to have broken in this circuit?

What's the chances of it lasting if I run it with the larger capacitor?

Tough Guy no. 1265
Guest

Fri Oct 30, 2015 11:11 pm   



On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 17:10:19 -0000, Tough Guy no. 1265 <no_at_spam.com> wrote:

Quote:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/fy5xm8lmd3g2vdt/Circuit.jpg?dl=0&s=sl

This supply came with a 2 foot 9W strip light of LEDs. After 1 week it began flickering badly. 240V AC in on the right. The circuit outputs 75V DC on the left, with a 3.5V AC ripple on it (with the 100uF capacitor included, which I verified is ok). With a 680uF capacitor in its place, there is no visible flicker.

What's likely to have broken in this circuit?

What's the chances of it lasting if I run it with the larger capacitor?


Forgot to add, I checked the voltage and current output with the larger capacitor, and it was virtually identical.

Ian Field
Guest

Sat Oct 31, 2015 12:48 am   



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7bwoyr4cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
Quote:
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 17:10:19 -0000, Tough Guy no. 1265 <no_at_spam.com
wrote:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/fy5xm8lmd3g2vdt/Circuit.jpg?dl=0&s=sl

This supply came with a 2 foot 9W strip light of LEDs. After 1 week it
began flickering badly. 240V AC in on the right. The circuit outputs
75V DC on the left, with a 3.5V AC ripple on it (with the 100uF capacitor
included, which I verified is ok). With a 680uF capacitor in its place,
there is no visible flicker.

What's likely to have broken in this circuit?

What's the chances of it lasting if I run it with the larger capacitor?

Forgot to add, I checked the voltage and current output with the larger
capacitor, and it was virtually identical.


When you first switch on, the fully discharged capacitor looks like a dead
short for the split second it takes to charge up. The bigger capacitor will
cause the turn on surge to last nearly 7x longer.

If the circuit has a NTC thermistor inrush limiter, you're probably OK.
I usually look for them in any equipment I scrap, when I still used filament
bulbs - one of those added behind the switch plate makes the bulb last
years.

They look similar to a disc ceramic capacitor about 10 - 15mm diameter, they
tend to be dull green or black and have a matt finish as compared to
capacitors that are usually shiny finish.

Cut a track in the AC live side and bridge it with the thermistor.

If the donor equipment also includes an MOV surge arrestor, that's also
worth adding to your kit.

Similar physical description, but they're usually beige colour or black and
most often shiny.

Its easy to tell the difference - the NTC will show continuity at low
voltage, the MOV should stand normal mains without conducting.

Tough Guy no. 1265
Guest

Sat Oct 31, 2015 12:58 am   



On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 18:48:26 -0000, Ian Field <gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:

Quote:


"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7bwoyr4cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 17:10:19 -0000, Tough Guy no. 1265 <no_at_spam.com
wrote:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/fy5xm8lmd3g2vdt/Circuit.jpg?dl=0&s=sl

This supply came with a 2 foot 9W strip light of LEDs. After 1 week it
began flickering badly. 240V AC in on the right. The circuit outputs
75V DC on the left, with a 3.5V AC ripple on it (with the 100uF capacitor
included, which I verified is ok). With a 680uF capacitor in its place,
there is no visible flicker.

What's likely to have broken in this circuit?

What's the chances of it lasting if I run it with the larger capacitor?

Forgot to add, I checked the voltage and current output with the larger
capacitor, and it was virtually identical.

When you first switch on, the fully discharged capacitor looks like a dead
short for the split second it takes to charge up. The bigger capacitor will
cause the turn on surge to last nearly 7x longer.


The LEDs light up very slowly with the bigger capacitor (for half to one second perhaps), so I think it's being limited. Also, when I turn it off, won't the capacitor stay charged to the voltage just below what's required to make the LEDs conduct, so it's not going to be empty at the next startup?

Quote:
If the circuit has a NTC thermistor inrush limiter, you're probably OK.
I usually look for them in any equipment I scrap, when I still used filament
bulbs - one of those added behind the switch plate makes the bulb last
years.

They look similar to a disc ceramic capacitor about 10 - 15mm diameter, they
tend to be dull green or black and have a matt finish as compared to
capacitors that are usually shiny finish.


I can't see one. There's a resistor connected directly to neutral on the bottom right of the photo. In series with that resistor are the two capacitors (blue and yellow), going across to live. Connected across those two capacitors is the input to the bridge rectifier made up of four diodes (under the blue capacitor). The red capacitor is across the output of the bridge. I can't easily make out what's connected to what for the rest of it, but there's a microchip, and the current going to the LEDs is very constant no matter what capacitor I put on it, so I'm guessing good regulation. These are also the only LEDs I've ever bought which stay the same brightness when I change the input mains voltage by 20 volts (which is what my UPS does when the voltage reaches 250 - I've got a very crap mains supply here since they changed the substation and they won't do anything about it as it's "within legal parameters", so my lighting circuit goes though the UPS).

Quote:
Cut a track in the AC live side and bridge it with the thermistor.

If the donor equipment also includes an MOV surge arrestor, that's also
worth adding to your kit.

Similar physical description, but they're usually beige colour or black and
most often shiny.

Its easy to tell the difference - the NTC will show continuity at low
voltage, the MOV should stand normal mains without conducting.


--
Women do not snore, burp, sweat, or fart.
Therefore, they must "bitch" or they will blow up.

Ian Field
Guest

Sat Oct 31, 2015 1:04 am   



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b1nus5cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
Quote:
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 18:48:26 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7bwoyr4cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 17:10:19 -0000, Tough Guy no. 1265 <no_at_spam.com
wrote:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/fy5xm8lmd3g2vdt/Circuit.jpg?dl=0&s=sl

This supply came with a 2 foot 9W strip light of LEDs. After 1 week it
began flickering badly. 240V AC in on the right. The circuit outputs
75V DC on the left, with a 3.5V AC ripple on it (with the 100uF
capacitor
included, which I verified is ok). With a 680uF capacitor in its
place,
there is no visible flicker.

What's likely to have broken in this circuit?

What's the chances of it lasting if I run it with the larger capacitor?

Forgot to add, I checked the voltage and current output with the larger
capacitor, and it was virtually identical.

When you first switch on, the fully discharged capacitor looks like a
dead
short for the split second it takes to charge up. The bigger capacitor
will
cause the turn on surge to last nearly 7x longer.

The LEDs light up very slowly with the bigger capacitor (for half to one
second perhaps), so I think it's being limited. Also, when I turn it off,
won't the capacitor stay charged to the voltage just below what's required
to make the LEDs conduct, so it's not going to be empty at the next
startup?

If the circuit has a NTC thermistor inrush limiter, you're probably OK.
I usually look for them in any equipment I scrap, when I still used
filament
bulbs - one of those added behind the switch plate makes the bulb last
years.

They look similar to a disc ceramic capacitor about 10 - 15mm diameter,
they
tend to be dull green or black and have a matt finish as compared to
capacitors that are usually shiny finish.

I can't see one. There's a resistor connected directly to neutral on the
bottom right of the photo. In series with that resistor are the two
capacitors (blue and yellow), going across to live.


Post a photo.

Tough Guy no. 1265
Guest

Sat Oct 31, 2015 1:11 am   



On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 19:04:07 -0000, Ian Field <gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:

Quote:


"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b1nus5cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 18:48:26 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7bwoyr4cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 17:10:19 -0000, Tough Guy no. 1265 <no_at_spam.com
wrote:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/fy5xm8lmd3g2vdt/Circuit.jpg?dl=0&s=sl

This supply came with a 2 foot 9W strip light of LEDs. After 1 week it
began flickering badly. 240V AC in on the right. The circuit outputs
75V DC on the left, with a 3.5V AC ripple on it (with the 100uF
capacitor
included, which I verified is ok). With a 680uF capacitor in its
place,
there is no visible flicker.

What's likely to have broken in this circuit?

What's the chances of it lasting if I run it with the larger capacitor?

Forgot to add, I checked the voltage and current output with the larger
capacitor, and it was virtually identical.

When you first switch on, the fully discharged capacitor looks like a
dead
short for the split second it takes to charge up. The bigger capacitor
will
cause the turn on surge to last nearly 7x longer.

The LEDs light up very slowly with the bigger capacitor (for half to one
second perhaps), so I think it's being limited. Also, when I turn it off,
won't the capacitor stay charged to the voltage just below what's required
to make the LEDs conduct, so it's not going to be empty at the next
startup?

If the circuit has a NTC thermistor inrush limiter, you're probably OK.
I usually look for them in any equipment I scrap, when I still used
filament
bulbs - one of those added behind the switch plate makes the bulb last
years.

They look similar to a disc ceramic capacitor about 10 - 15mm diameter,
they
tend to be dull green or black and have a matt finish as compared to
capacitors that are usually shiny finish.

I can't see one. There's a resistor connected directly to neutral on the
bottom right of the photo. In series with that resistor are the two
capacitors (blue and yellow), going across to live.

Post a photo.


The link is at the top of this post, you must have missed it.

--
What comes after 69?
Mouthwash.

Ian Field
Guest

Sat Oct 31, 2015 2:06 am   



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b187f2cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
Quote:
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 19:04:07 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b1nus5cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 18:48:26 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7bwoyr4cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 17:10:19 -0000, Tough Guy no. 1265 <no_at_spam.com
wrote:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/fy5xm8lmd3g2vdt/Circuit.jpg?dl=0&s=sl

This supply came with a 2 foot 9W strip light of LEDs. After 1 week
it
began flickering badly. 240V AC in on the right. The circuit
outputs
75V DC on the left, with a 3.5V AC ripple on it (with the 100uF
capacitor
included, which I verified is ok). With a 680uF capacitor in its
place,
there is no visible flicker.

What's likely to have broken in this circuit?

What's the chances of it lasting if I run it with the larger
capacitor?

Forgot to add, I checked the voltage and current output with the
larger
capacitor, and it was virtually identical.

When you first switch on, the fully discharged capacitor looks like a
dead
short for the split second it takes to charge up. The bigger capacitor
will
cause the turn on surge to last nearly 7x longer.

The LEDs light up very slowly with the bigger capacitor (for half to one
second perhaps), so I think it's being limited. Also, when I turn it
off,
won't the capacitor stay charged to the voltage just below what's
required
to make the LEDs conduct, so it's not going to be empty at the next
startup?

If the circuit has a NTC thermistor inrush limiter, you're probably OK.
I usually look for them in any equipment I scrap, when I still used
filament
bulbs - one of those added behind the switch plate makes the bulb last
years.

They look similar to a disc ceramic capacitor about 10 - 15mm diameter,
they
tend to be dull green or black and have a matt finish as compared to
capacitors that are usually shiny finish.

I can't see one. There's a resistor connected directly to neutral on
the
bottom right of the photo. In series with that resistor are the two
capacitors (blue and yellow), going across to live.

Post a photo.

The link is at the top of this post, you must have missed it.


Can't see anything that looks like an NTC, or a MOV, adding them wouldn't
hurt.

The NTC can be spliced into the mains live feed without doing anything to
the board, the MOV should be added across the AC input to the bridge
rectifier.

If the electrolytic capacitor on the left was too small, the SMPSU circuit
would try to even out the voltage regardless - if it has overcurrent trip;
too big a capacitor would keep tripping it every time it started up again.
But it might eventually get going.

Tough Guy no. 1265
Guest

Sat Oct 31, 2015 2:21 am   



On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 20:06:02 -0000, Ian Field <gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:

Quote:


"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b187f2cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 19:04:07 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b1nus5cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 18:48:26 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7bwoyr4cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 17:10:19 -0000, Tough Guy no. 1265 <no_at_spam.com
wrote:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/fy5xm8lmd3g2vdt/Circuit.jpg?dl=0&s=sl

This supply came with a 2 foot 9W strip light of LEDs. After 1 week
it
began flickering badly. 240V AC in on the right. The circuit
outputs
75V DC on the left, with a 3.5V AC ripple on it (with the 100uF
capacitor
included, which I verified is ok). With a 680uF capacitor in its
place,
there is no visible flicker.

What's likely to have broken in this circuit?

What's the chances of it lasting if I run it with the larger
capacitor?

Forgot to add, I checked the voltage and current output with the
larger
capacitor, and it was virtually identical.

When you first switch on, the fully discharged capacitor looks like a
dead
short for the split second it takes to charge up. The bigger capacitor
will
cause the turn on surge to last nearly 7x longer.

The LEDs light up very slowly with the bigger capacitor (for half to one
second perhaps), so I think it's being limited. Also, when I turn it
off,
won't the capacitor stay charged to the voltage just below what's
required
to make the LEDs conduct, so it's not going to be empty at the next
startup?

If the circuit has a NTC thermistor inrush limiter, you're probably OK.
I usually look for them in any equipment I scrap, when I still used
filament
bulbs - one of those added behind the switch plate makes the bulb last
years.

They look similar to a disc ceramic capacitor about 10 - 15mm diameter,
they
tend to be dull green or black and have a matt finish as compared to
capacitors that are usually shiny finish.

I can't see one. There's a resistor connected directly to neutral on
the
bottom right of the photo. In series with that resistor are the two
capacitors (blue and yellow), going across to live.

Post a photo.

The link is at the top of this post, you must have missed it.

Can't see anything that looks like an NTC, or a MOV, adding them wouldn't
hurt.

The NTC can be spliced into the mains live feed without doing anything to
the board, the MOV should be added across the AC input to the bridge
rectifier.

If the electrolytic capacitor on the left was too small, the SMPSU circuit
would try to even out the voltage regardless - if it has overcurrent trip;
too big a capacitor would keep tripping it every time it started up again.
But it might eventually get going.


It appears to be current limited. It takes some time to charge the larger capacitor. The LEDs gradually brighten.

--
ADULT: A person who has stopped growing at both ends and is now growing in the middle.

Ian Field
Guest

Sat Oct 31, 2015 2:30 am   



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b5hg2jcpfvgl_at_red.lan...
Quote:
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 20:06:02 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b187f2cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 19:04:07 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b1nus5cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 18:48:26 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7bwoyr4cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 17:10:19 -0000, Tough Guy no. 1265 <no_at_spam.com
wrote:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/fy5xm8lmd3g2vdt/Circuit.jpg?dl=0&s=sl

This supply came with a 2 foot 9W strip light of LEDs. After 1
week
it
began flickering badly. 240V AC in on the right. The circuit
outputs
75V DC on the left, with a 3.5V AC ripple on it (with the 100uF
capacitor
included, which I verified is ok). With a 680uF capacitor in its
place,
there is no visible flicker.

What's likely to have broken in this circuit?

What's the chances of it lasting if I run it with the larger
capacitor?

Forgot to add, I checked the voltage and current output with the
larger
capacitor, and it was virtually identical.

When you first switch on, the fully discharged capacitor looks like a
dead
short for the split second it takes to charge up. The bigger
capacitor
will
cause the turn on surge to last nearly 7x longer.

The LEDs light up very slowly with the bigger capacitor (for half to
one
second perhaps), so I think it's being limited. Also, when I turn it
off,
won't the capacitor stay charged to the voltage just below what's
required
to make the LEDs conduct, so it's not going to be empty at the next
startup?

If the circuit has a NTC thermistor inrush limiter, you're probably
OK.
I usually look for them in any equipment I scrap, when I still used
filament
bulbs - one of those added behind the switch plate makes the bulb
last
years.

They look similar to a disc ceramic capacitor about 10 - 15mm
diameter,
they
tend to be dull green or black and have a matt finish as compared to
capacitors that are usually shiny finish.

I can't see one. There's a resistor connected directly to neutral on
the
bottom right of the photo. In series with that resistor are the two
capacitors (blue and yellow), going across to live.

Post a photo.

The link is at the top of this post, you must have missed it.

Can't see anything that looks like an NTC, or a MOV, adding them wouldn't
hurt.

The NTC can be spliced into the mains live feed without doing anything to
the board, the MOV should be added across the AC input to the bridge
rectifier.

If the electrolytic capacitor on the left was too small, the SMPSU
circuit
would try to even out the voltage regardless - if it has overcurrent
trip;
too big a capacitor would keep tripping it every time it started up
again.
But it might eventually get going.

It appears to be current limited. It takes some time to charge the larger
capacitor. The LEDs gradually brighten.


A constant voltage supply driving LEDs would let the magic smoke out.

Tough Guy no. 1265
Guest

Sat Oct 31, 2015 2:39 am   



On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 20:30:40 -0000, Ian Field <gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:

Quote:


"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b5hg2jcpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 20:06:02 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b187f2cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 19:04:07 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b1nus5cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 18:48:26 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7bwoyr4cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 17:10:19 -0000, Tough Guy no. 1265 <no_at_spam.com
wrote:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/fy5xm8lmd3g2vdt/Circuit.jpg?dl=0&s=sl

This supply came with a 2 foot 9W strip light of LEDs. After 1
week
it
began flickering badly. 240V AC in on the right. The circuit
outputs
75V DC on the left, with a 3.5V AC ripple on it (with the 100uF
capacitor
included, which I verified is ok). With a 680uF capacitor in its
place,
there is no visible flicker.

What's likely to have broken in this circuit?

What's the chances of it lasting if I run it with the larger
capacitor?

Forgot to add, I checked the voltage and current output with the
larger
capacitor, and it was virtually identical.

When you first switch on, the fully discharged capacitor looks like a
dead
short for the split second it takes to charge up. The bigger
capacitor
will
cause the turn on surge to last nearly 7x longer.

The LEDs light up very slowly with the bigger capacitor (for half to
one
second perhaps), so I think it's being limited. Also, when I turn it
off,
won't the capacitor stay charged to the voltage just below what's
required
to make the LEDs conduct, so it's not going to be empty at the next
startup?

If the circuit has a NTC thermistor inrush limiter, you're probably
OK.
I usually look for them in any equipment I scrap, when I still used
filament
bulbs - one of those added behind the switch plate makes the bulb
last
years.

They look similar to a disc ceramic capacitor about 10 - 15mm
diameter,
they
tend to be dull green or black and have a matt finish as compared to
capacitors that are usually shiny finish.

I can't see one. There's a resistor connected directly to neutral on
the
bottom right of the photo. In series with that resistor are the two
capacitors (blue and yellow), going across to live.

Post a photo.

The link is at the top of this post, you must have missed it.

Can't see anything that looks like an NTC, or a MOV, adding them wouldn't
hurt.

The NTC can be spliced into the mains live feed without doing anything to
the board, the MOV should be added across the AC input to the bridge
rectifier.

If the electrolytic capacitor on the left was too small, the SMPSU
circuit
would try to even out the voltage regardless - if it has overcurrent
trip;
too big a capacitor would keep tripping it every time it started up
again.
But it might eventually get going.

It appears to be current limited. It takes some time to charge the larger
capacitor. The LEDs gradually brighten.

A constant voltage supply driving LEDs would let the magic smoke out.


Well most of the LED lamps I've got change brightness depending on the mains voltage. So they can't be that constant current. Maybe they just have a voltage as a fraction of the mains, then rely on a resistor to limit the current?

--
Why didn't Noah swat those two mosquitoes?

Ian Field
Guest

Sat Oct 31, 2015 2:52 am   



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b6clejcpfvgl_at_red.lan...
Quote:
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 20:30:40 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b5hg2jcpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 20:06:02 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b187f2cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 19:04:07 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b1nus5cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 18:48:26 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7bwoyr4cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 17:10:19 -0000, Tough Guy no. 1265
no_at_spam.com
wrote:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/fy5xm8lmd3g2vdt/Circuit.jpg?dl=0&s=sl

This supply came with a 2 foot 9W strip light of LEDs. After 1
week
it
began flickering badly. 240V AC in on the right. The circuit
outputs
75V DC on the left, with a 3.5V AC ripple on it (with the 100uF
capacitor
included, which I verified is ok). With a 680uF capacitor in its
place,
there is no visible flicker.

What's likely to have broken in this circuit?

What's the chances of it lasting if I run it with the larger
capacitor?

Forgot to add, I checked the voltage and current output with the
larger
capacitor, and it was virtually identical.

When you first switch on, the fully discharged capacitor looks like
a
dead
short for the split second it takes to charge up. The bigger
capacitor
will
cause the turn on surge to last nearly 7x longer.

The LEDs light up very slowly with the bigger capacitor (for half to
one
second perhaps), so I think it's being limited. Also, when I turn
it
off,
won't the capacitor stay charged to the voltage just below what's
required
to make the LEDs conduct, so it's not going to be empty at the next
startup?

If the circuit has a NTC thermistor inrush limiter, you're probably
OK.
I usually look for them in any equipment I scrap, when I still used
filament
bulbs - one of those added behind the switch plate makes the bulb
last
years.

They look similar to a disc ceramic capacitor about 10 - 15mm
diameter,
they
tend to be dull green or black and have a matt finish as compared
to
capacitors that are usually shiny finish.

I can't see one. There's a resistor connected directly to neutral
on
the
bottom right of the photo. In series with that resistor are the two
capacitors (blue and yellow), going across to live.

Post a photo.

The link is at the top of this post, you must have missed it.

Can't see anything that looks like an NTC, or a MOV, adding them
wouldn't
hurt.

The NTC can be spliced into the mains live feed without doing anything
to
the board, the MOV should be added across the AC input to the bridge
rectifier.

If the electrolytic capacitor on the left was too small, the SMPSU
circuit
would try to even out the voltage regardless - if it has overcurrent
trip;
too big a capacitor would keep tripping it every time it started up
again.
But it might eventually get going.

It appears to be current limited. It takes some time to charge the
larger
capacitor. The LEDs gradually brighten.

A constant voltage supply driving LEDs would let the magic smoke out.

Well most of the LED lamps I've got change brightness depending on the
mains voltage. So they can't be that constant current. Maybe they just
have a voltage as a fraction of the mains, then rely on a resistor to
limit the current?


I bought various LED lamps from a discount store just to crack open and see
what's in them.

One had a 4 terminal component close to the pads for the LED wires, I
couldn't identify the part but it probably has to do with current
regulation.

Among hobbyists, there is a circuit for powering regular LEDs from a single
1.5V cell called a "Joule thief" its basically a flyback converter with no
regulation, but the LED only conducts on the flyback peaks so there is a
sort of limiting.

Another trick is the so called "wattless dropper" - a capacitor in series
with the mains so capacitive reactance is large compared to the dynamic
resistance of the LED load, with large Xc, current doesn't change much with
varying mains - some commercial LED bulbs use it.

Tough Guy no. 1265
Guest

Sat Oct 31, 2015 3:35 am   



On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 20:52:55 -0000, Ian Field <gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:

Quote:


"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b6clejcpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 20:30:40 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b5hg2jcpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 20:06:02 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b187f2cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 19:04:07 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b1nus5cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 18:48:26 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7bwoyr4cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 17:10:19 -0000, Tough Guy no. 1265
no_at_spam.com
wrote:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/fy5xm8lmd3g2vdt/Circuit.jpg?dl=0&s=sl

This supply came with a 2 foot 9W strip light of LEDs. After 1
week
it
began flickering badly. 240V AC in on the right. The circuit
outputs
75V DC on the left, with a 3.5V AC ripple on it (with the 100uF
capacitor
included, which I verified is ok). With a 680uF capacitor in its
place,
there is no visible flicker.

What's likely to have broken in this circuit?

What's the chances of it lasting if I run it with the larger
capacitor?

Forgot to add, I checked the voltage and current output with the
larger
capacitor, and it was virtually identical.

When you first switch on, the fully discharged capacitor looks like
a
dead
short for the split second it takes to charge up. The bigger
capacitor
will
cause the turn on surge to last nearly 7x longer.

The LEDs light up very slowly with the bigger capacitor (for half to
one
second perhaps), so I think it's being limited. Also, when I turn
it
off,
won't the capacitor stay charged to the voltage just below what's
required
to make the LEDs conduct, so it's not going to be empty at the next
startup?

If the circuit has a NTC thermistor inrush limiter, you're probably
OK.
I usually look for them in any equipment I scrap, when I still used
filament
bulbs - one of those added behind the switch plate makes the bulb
last
years.

They look similar to a disc ceramic capacitor about 10 - 15mm
diameter,
they
tend to be dull green or black and have a matt finish as compared
to
capacitors that are usually shiny finish.

I can't see one. There's a resistor connected directly to neutral
on
the
bottom right of the photo. In series with that resistor are the two
capacitors (blue and yellow), going across to live.

Post a photo.

The link is at the top of this post, you must have missed it.

Can't see anything that looks like an NTC, or a MOV, adding them
wouldn't
hurt.

The NTC can be spliced into the mains live feed without doing anything
to
the board, the MOV should be added across the AC input to the bridge
rectifier.

If the electrolytic capacitor on the left was too small, the SMPSU
circuit
would try to even out the voltage regardless - if it has overcurrent
trip;
too big a capacitor would keep tripping it every time it started up
again.
But it might eventually get going.

It appears to be current limited. It takes some time to charge the
larger
capacitor. The LEDs gradually brighten.

A constant voltage supply driving LEDs would let the magic smoke out.

Well most of the LED lamps I've got change brightness depending on the
mains voltage. So they can't be that constant current. Maybe they just
have a voltage as a fraction of the mains, then rely on a resistor to
limit the current?

I bought various LED lamps from a discount store just to crack open and see
what's in them.

One had a 4 terminal component close to the pads for the LED wires, I
couldn't identify the part but it probably has to do with current
regulation.

Among hobbyists, there is a circuit for powering regular LEDs from a single
1.5V cell called a "Joule thief" its basically a flyback converter with no
regulation, but the LED only conducts on the flyback peaks so there is a
sort of limiting.

Another trick is the so called "wattless dropper" - a capacitor in series
with the mains so capacitive reactance is large compared to the dynamic
resistance of the LED load, with large Xc, current doesn't change much with
varying mains - some commercial LED bulbs use it.


I was going to make something using a wattless dropper once. I think it was just to power an indicator LED from 240VAC instead of fitting a neon. Something made me decide it wasn't as good as it was made out to be.

--
Arriving home unexpectedly early from a business trip, the tired executive was shocked to discover his wife in bed with his next door neighbour.
"Since you are in bed with my wife," the furious man shouted, "I'm going over to sleep with yours!"
"Go right ahead," was the reply. "The rest will do you good."

Ian Field
Guest

Sat Oct 31, 2015 3:53 am   



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b8xtyjcpfvgl_at_red.lan...
Quote:
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 20:52:55 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b6clejcpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 20:30:40 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b5hg2jcpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 20:06:02 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b187f2cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 19:04:07 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b1nus5cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 18:48:26 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7bwoyr4cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 17:10:19 -0000, Tough Guy no. 1265
no_at_spam.com
wrote:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/fy5xm8lmd3g2vdt/Circuit.jpg?dl=0&s=sl

This supply came with a 2 foot 9W strip light of LEDs. After 1
week
it
began flickering badly. 240V AC in on the right. The circuit
outputs
75V DC on the left, with a 3.5V AC ripple on it (with the 100uF
capacitor
included, which I verified is ok). With a 680uF capacitor in
its
place,
there is no visible flicker.

What's likely to have broken in this circuit?

What's the chances of it lasting if I run it with the larger
capacitor?

Forgot to add, I checked the voltage and current output with the
larger
capacitor, and it was virtually identical.

When you first switch on, the fully discharged capacitor looks
like
a
dead
short for the split second it takes to charge up. The bigger
capacitor
will
cause the turn on surge to last nearly 7x longer.

The LEDs light up very slowly with the bigger capacitor (for half
to
one
second perhaps), so I think it's being limited. Also, when I turn
it
off,
won't the capacitor stay charged to the voltage just below what's
required
to make the LEDs conduct, so it's not going to be empty at the
next
startup?

If the circuit has a NTC thermistor inrush limiter, you're
probably
OK.
I usually look for them in any equipment I scrap, when I still
used
filament
bulbs - one of those added behind the switch plate makes the bulb
last
years.

They look similar to a disc ceramic capacitor about 10 - 15mm
diameter,
they
tend to be dull green or black and have a matt finish as compared
to
capacitors that are usually shiny finish.

I can't see one. There's a resistor connected directly to neutral
on
the
bottom right of the photo. In series with that resistor are the
two
capacitors (blue and yellow), going across to live.

Post a photo.

The link is at the top of this post, you must have missed it.

Can't see anything that looks like an NTC, or a MOV, adding them
wouldn't
hurt.

The NTC can be spliced into the mains live feed without doing
anything
to
the board, the MOV should be added across the AC input to the bridge
rectifier.

If the electrolytic capacitor on the left was too small, the SMPSU
circuit
would try to even out the voltage regardless - if it has overcurrent
trip;
too big a capacitor would keep tripping it every time it started up
again.
But it might eventually get going.

It appears to be current limited. It takes some time to charge the
larger
capacitor. The LEDs gradually brighten.

A constant voltage supply driving LEDs would let the magic smoke out.

Well most of the LED lamps I've got change brightness depending on the
mains voltage. So they can't be that constant current. Maybe they just
have a voltage as a fraction of the mains, then rely on a resistor to
limit the current?

I bought various LED lamps from a discount store just to crack open and
see
what's in them.

One had a 4 terminal component close to the pads for the LED wires, I
couldn't identify the part but it probably has to do with current
regulation.

Among hobbyists, there is a circuit for powering regular LEDs from a
single
1.5V cell called a "Joule thief" its basically a flyback converter with
no
regulation, but the LED only conducts on the flyback peaks so there is a
sort of limiting.

Another trick is the so called "wattless dropper" - a capacitor in series
with the mains so capacitive reactance is large compared to the dynamic
resistance of the LED load, with large Xc, current doesn't change much
with
varying mains - some commercial LED bulbs use it.

I was going to make something using a wattless dropper once. I think it
was just to power an indicator LED from 240VAC instead of fitting a neon.
Something made me decide it wasn't as good as it was made out to be.


You have to include a resistor in series, the current peaks during the
highest rate of change of the voltage waveform. Any spikes on the mains need
to be attenuated too.

Tough Guy no. 1265
Guest

Sat Oct 31, 2015 4:08 am   



On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 21:53:16 -0000, Ian Field <gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:

Quote:


"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b8xtyjcpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 20:52:55 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b6clejcpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 20:30:40 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b5hg2jcpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 20:06:02 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b187f2cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 19:04:07 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b1nus5cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 18:48:26 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7bwoyr4cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 17:10:19 -0000, Tough Guy no. 1265
no_at_spam.com
wrote:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/fy5xm8lmd3g2vdt/Circuit.jpg?dl=0&s=sl

This supply came with a 2 foot 9W strip light of LEDs. After 1
week
it
began flickering badly. 240V AC in on the right. The circuit
outputs
75V DC on the left, with a 3.5V AC ripple on it (with the 100uF
capacitor
included, which I verified is ok). With a 680uF capacitor in
its
place,
there is no visible flicker.

What's likely to have broken in this circuit?

What's the chances of it lasting if I run it with the larger
capacitor?

Forgot to add, I checked the voltage and current output with the
larger
capacitor, and it was virtually identical.

When you first switch on, the fully discharged capacitor looks
like
a
dead
short for the split second it takes to charge up. The bigger
capacitor
will
cause the turn on surge to last nearly 7x longer.

The LEDs light up very slowly with the bigger capacitor (for half
to
one
second perhaps), so I think it's being limited. Also, when I turn
it
off,
won't the capacitor stay charged to the voltage just below what's
required
to make the LEDs conduct, so it's not going to be empty at the
next
startup?

If the circuit has a NTC thermistor inrush limiter, you're
probably
OK.
I usually look for them in any equipment I scrap, when I still
used
filament
bulbs - one of those added behind the switch plate makes the bulb
last
years.

They look similar to a disc ceramic capacitor about 10 - 15mm
diameter,
they
tend to be dull green or black and have a matt finish as compared
to
capacitors that are usually shiny finish.

I can't see one. There's a resistor connected directly to neutral
on
the
bottom right of the photo. In series with that resistor are the
two
capacitors (blue and yellow), going across to live.

Post a photo.

The link is at the top of this post, you must have missed it.

Can't see anything that looks like an NTC, or a MOV, adding them
wouldn't
hurt.

The NTC can be spliced into the mains live feed without doing
anything
to
the board, the MOV should be added across the AC input to the bridge
rectifier.

If the electrolytic capacitor on the left was too small, the SMPSU
circuit
would try to even out the voltage regardless - if it has overcurrent
trip;
too big a capacitor would keep tripping it every time it started up
again.
But it might eventually get going.

It appears to be current limited. It takes some time to charge the
larger
capacitor. The LEDs gradually brighten.

A constant voltage supply driving LEDs would let the magic smoke out.

Well most of the LED lamps I've got change brightness depending on the
mains voltage. So they can't be that constant current. Maybe they just
have a voltage as a fraction of the mains, then rely on a resistor to
limit the current?

I bought various LED lamps from a discount store just to crack open and
see
what's in them.

One had a 4 terminal component close to the pads for the LED wires, I
couldn't identify the part but it probably has to do with current
regulation.

Among hobbyists, there is a circuit for powering regular LEDs from a
single
1.5V cell called a "Joule thief" its basically a flyback converter with
no
regulation, but the LED only conducts on the flyback peaks so there is a
sort of limiting.

Another trick is the so called "wattless dropper" - a capacitor in series
with the mains so capacitive reactance is large compared to the dynamic
resistance of the LED load, with large Xc, current doesn't change much
with
varying mains - some commercial LED bulbs use it.

I was going to make something using a wattless dropper once. I think it
was just to power an indicator LED from 240VAC instead of fitting a neon.
Something made me decide it wasn't as good as it was made out to be.

You have to include a resistor in series, the current peaks during the
highest rate of change of the voltage waveform. Any spikes on the mains need
to be attenuated too.


I probably gave up on the idea because of how much limiting resistor I'd still need, and decided a neon would use no more power, although would eventually expire.

--
Isn't it a bit unnerving that doctors call what they do "practice?"

Ian Field
Guest

Sat Oct 31, 2015 4:10 am   



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7caf7itcpfvgl_at_red.lan...
Quote:
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 21:53:16 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b8xtyjcpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 20:52:55 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b6clejcpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 20:30:40 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b5hg2jcpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 20:06:02 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b187f2cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 19:04:07 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7b1nus5cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 18:48:26 -0000, Ian Field
gangprobing.alien_at_ntlworld.com> wrote:



"Tough Guy no. 1265" <no_at_spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.x7bwoyr4cpfvgl_at_red.lan...
On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 17:10:19 -0000, Tough Guy no. 1265
no_at_spam.com
wrote:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/fy5xm8lmd3g2vdt/Circuit.jpg?dl=0&s=sl

This supply came with a 2 foot 9W strip light of LEDs. After
1
week
it
began flickering badly. 240V AC in on the right. The
circuit
outputs
75V DC on the left, with a 3.5V AC ripple on it (with the
100uF
capacitor
included, which I verified is ok). With a 680uF capacitor in
its
place,
there is no visible flicker.

What's likely to have broken in this circuit?

What's the chances of it lasting if I run it with the larger
capacitor?

Forgot to add, I checked the voltage and current output with
the
larger
capacitor, and it was virtually identical.

When you first switch on, the fully discharged capacitor looks
like
a
dead
short for the split second it takes to charge up. The bigger
capacitor
will
cause the turn on surge to last nearly 7x longer.

The LEDs light up very slowly with the bigger capacitor (for
half
to
one
second perhaps), so I think it's being limited. Also, when I
turn
it
off,
won't the capacitor stay charged to the voltage just below
what's
required
to make the LEDs conduct, so it's not going to be empty at the
next
startup?

If the circuit has a NTC thermistor inrush limiter, you're
probably
OK.
I usually look for them in any equipment I scrap, when I still
used
filament
bulbs - one of those added behind the switch plate makes the
bulb
last
years.

They look similar to a disc ceramic capacitor about 10 - 15mm
diameter,
they
tend to be dull green or black and have a matt finish as
compared
to
capacitors that are usually shiny finish.

I can't see one. There's a resistor connected directly to
neutral
on
the
bottom right of the photo. In series with that resistor are the
two
capacitors (blue and yellow), going across to live.

Post a photo.

The link is at the top of this post, you must have missed it.

Can't see anything that looks like an NTC, or a MOV, adding them
wouldn't
hurt.

The NTC can be spliced into the mains live feed without doing
anything
to
the board, the MOV should be added across the AC input to the
bridge
rectifier.

If the electrolytic capacitor on the left was too small, the SMPSU
circuit
would try to even out the voltage regardless - if it has
overcurrent
trip;
too big a capacitor would keep tripping it every time it started up
again.
But it might eventually get going.

It appears to be current limited. It takes some time to charge the
larger
capacitor. The LEDs gradually brighten.

A constant voltage supply driving LEDs would let the magic smoke out.

Well most of the LED lamps I've got change brightness depending on the
mains voltage. So they can't be that constant current. Maybe they
just
have a voltage as a fraction of the mains, then rely on a resistor to
limit the current?

I bought various LED lamps from a discount store just to crack open and
see
what's in them.

One had a 4 terminal component close to the pads for the LED wires, I
couldn't identify the part but it probably has to do with current
regulation.

Among hobbyists, there is a circuit for powering regular LEDs from a
single
1.5V cell called a "Joule thief" its basically a flyback converter with
no
regulation, but the LED only conducts on the flyback peaks so there is
a
sort of limiting.

Another trick is the so called "wattless dropper" - a capacitor in
series
with the mains so capacitive reactance is large compared to the dynamic
resistance of the LED load, with large Xc, current doesn't change much
with
varying mains - some commercial LED bulbs use it.

I was going to make something using a wattless dropper once. I think it
was just to power an indicator LED from 240VAC instead of fitting a
neon.
Something made me decide it wasn't as good as it was made out to be.

You have to include a resistor in series, the current peaks during the
highest rate of change of the voltage waveform. Any spikes on the mains
need
to be attenuated too.

I probably gave up on the idea because of how much limiting resistor I'd
still need, and decided a neon would use no more power, although would
eventually expire.


The only neons I've ever seen expire, was ones I was experimenting on.

Goto page 1, 2  Next

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