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Guest

Sun Dec 16, 2018 9:45 pm   



On Tuesday, April 24, 2018 at 6:32:38 AM UTC-4, azie...@gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
Dear Jürgen,

sorry for reviving this thread after all these years - but your mentioned eMail address is invalid meanwhile.
So if you are still listening - did you find the searched disassemblers in the last 18 years?
I have found some pieces, so maybe they might be of interest for you too.

Andreas


Hello. I am looking for some disassemblers too. 8051 In particular. Can you help?

David Brown
Guest

Mon Dec 17, 2018 9:45 am   



On 16/12/18 21:06, frankcovending_at_gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
On Tuesday, April 24, 2018 at 6:32:38 AM UTC-4, azie...@gmail.com wrote:
Dear Jürgen,

sorry for reviving this thread after all these years - but your mentioned eMail address is invalid meanwhile.
So if you are still listening - did you find the searched disassemblers in the last 18 years?
I have found some pieces, so maybe they might be of interest for you too.

Andreas

Hello. I am looking for some disassemblers too. 8051 In particular. Can you help?


It should not be hard to find an 8051 disassembler with a little google
searching.

If you want to get help from a Usenet group, please remember that these
really are communities - Google Groups is an archive, so searching for
old posts and replying to them is not going to get you anywhere. Get a
real newsreader client (Thunderbird is fine, and works on all
platforms), get a real Usenet server (news.eternal-september.org is a
good, free choice), and join the groups that interest you.
comp.arch.embedded is probably your best bet here.


Guest

Mon Dec 17, 2018 1:45 pm   



I've spent hours searching and kept coming up empty. I've found all of the manuals and all software through google, but that 8051 compiler just isn't easy. You are probably right that replying to old emails etc is not going to get me far, but it is a resource and I'm going to exhaust all of them. I'll look into the resources you have provided.

David Brown
Guest

Mon Dec 17, 2018 3:45 pm   



On 17/12/18 13:40, frankcovending_at_gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
I've spent hours searching and kept coming up empty. I've found all
of the manuals and all software through google, but that 8051
compiler just isn't easy. You are probably right that replying to old
emails etc is not going to get me far, but it is a resource and I'm
going to exhaust all of them. I'll look into the resources you have
provided.


A compiler is entirely different from a disassembler. You said "I am
looking for some disassemblers too. 8051 in particular". Now you say
you want a compiler. Which is it?

There are /lots/ of compiler for the 8051. Many commercial ones, and at
least one solid open source one. I don't know about disassemblers for
the core, having never needed to use one, but google finds plenty within
a few seconds.

You need to figure out what tool(s) you are actually looking for - or at
least figure out what you want to do with them. You need to figure out
whether you are dealing with the core in general, or specific devices,
whether you want commercial tools or free ones, and so on.

And if you want help from people, you will have to say what you have
tried so far and why those tools have been inappropriate. Otherwise no
one can help.

But as I say, please drop the "Google Groups" interface - it is
absolutely terrible for posting to Usenet (though it is okay for
searching archives). If you can't use a proper Usenet client, then at
least learn to use Google Groups properly - it's default options are
contrary to standard Usenet usage. (This is not your fault, it is
Google's fault - but it is you, the GG poster, who has to make the
effort.) Quote posts correctly, with attribution and appropriate
snipping, and split your lines correctly.

And then, when you have this figured out, post to comp.arch.embedded -
it is the best newsgroup for such tools. (comp.arch.fpga is a fine and
helpful group too, but c.a.e. will reach more 8051 users.)


Guest

Mon Dec 17, 2018 4:45 pm   



On Monday, December 17, 2018 at 9:31:21 AM UTC-5, David Brown wrote:
Quote:
On 17/12/18 13:40, wrote:
I've spent hours searching and kept coming up empty. I've found all
of the manuals and all software through google, but that 8051
compiler just isn't easy. You are probably right that replying to old
emails etc is not going to get me far, but it is a resource and I'm
going to exhaust all of them. I'll look into the resources you have
provided.


A compiler is entirely different from a disassembler. You said "I am
looking for some disassemblers too. 8051 in particular". Now you say
you want a compiler. Which is it?

There are /lots/ of compiler for the 8051. Many commercial ones, and at
least one solid open source one. I don't know about disassemblers for
the core, having never needed to use one, but google finds plenty within
a few seconds.

You need to figure out what tool(s) you are actually looking for - or at
least figure out what you want to do with them. You need to figure out
whether you are dealing with the core in general, or specific devices,
whether you want commercial tools or free ones, and so on.

And if you want help from people, you will have to say what you have
tried so far and why those tools have been inappropriate. Otherwise no
one can help.

But as I say, please drop the "Google Groups" interface - it is
absolutely terrible for posting to Usenet (though it is okay for
searching archives). If you can't use a proper Usenet client, then at
least learn to use Google Groups properly - it's default options are
contrary to standard Usenet usage. (This is not your fault, it is
Google's fault - but it is you, the GG poster, who has to make the
effort.) Quote posts correctly, with attribution and appropriate
snipping, and split your lines correctly.

And then, when you have this figured out, post to comp.arch.embedded -
it is the best newsgroup for such tools. (comp.arch.fpga is a fine and
helpful group too, but c.a.e. will reach more 8051 users.)


My mistake on my prior reply. I did not intend to say compiler. I meant to say disassembler. My mistake, human...

I get what you're saying about everything being on google, but it's a tool not the means to an end. I'm trying to get my hands on the 8051 disassembler for the pm3585 logic analyzer. I'm trying to learn how to debug the 8051 using the pm3585.


Now I have been out of the electronics/computer field for quite some time and I had shifted my focus to mechanical and civil engineering. I am just getting back into hobby electronics. I am working on some mechatronics project at home in my free time and I'm prototyping with off the shelf controllers, but my goal is to develop my own controller and I am tempted to use the 8051 or a Z80. I'm leaning towards the 8051 because the DS89C4XX has everything I need and I have the components from a sample pack I got almost a decade ago. I have a Z80 as well.

David Brown
Guest

Mon Dec 17, 2018 10:45 pm   



On 17/12/2018 16:02, frankcovending_at_gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
On Monday, December 17, 2018 at 9:31:21 AM UTC-5, David Brown wrote:
On 17/12/18 13:40, wrote:
I've spent hours searching and kept coming up empty. I've found all
of the manuals and all software through google, but that 8051
compiler just isn't easy. You are probably right that replying to old
emails etc is not going to get me far, but it is a resource and I'm
going to exhaust all of them. I'll look into the resources you have
provided.


A compiler is entirely different from a disassembler. You said "I am
looking for some disassemblers too. 8051 in particular". Now you say
you want a compiler. Which is it?

There are /lots/ of compiler for the 8051. Many commercial ones, and at
least one solid open source one. I don't know about disassemblers for
the core, having never needed to use one, but google finds plenty within
a few seconds.

You need to figure out what tool(s) you are actually looking for - or at
least figure out what you want to do with them. You need to figure out
whether you are dealing with the core in general, or specific devices,
whether you want commercial tools or free ones, and so on.

And if you want help from people, you will have to say what you have
tried so far and why those tools have been inappropriate. Otherwise no
one can help.

But as I say, please drop the "Google Groups" interface - it is
absolutely terrible for posting to Usenet (though it is okay for
searching archives). If you can't use a proper Usenet client, then at
least learn to use Google Groups properly - it's default options are
contrary to standard Usenet usage. (This is not your fault, it is
Google's fault - but it is you, the GG poster, who has to make the
effort.) Quote posts correctly, with attribution and appropriate
snipping, and split your lines correctly.

And then, when you have this figured out, post to comp.arch.embedded -
it is the best newsgroup for such tools. (comp.arch.fpga is a fine and
helpful group too, but c.a.e. will reach more 8051 users.)

My mistake on my prior reply. I did not intend to say compiler. I
meant to say disassembler. My mistake, human...


OK.

Quote:

I get what you're saying about everything being on google, but it's a
tool not the means to an end. I'm trying to get my hands on the 8051
disassembler for the pm3585 logic analyzer. I'm trying to learn how to
debug the 8051 using the pm3585.


Is this for a history project, or a museum? Nobody has used a logic
analyser for microcontroller debugging for at least 20 years, probably more.

Quote:

Now I have been out of the electronics/computer field for quite some
time and I had shifted my focus to mechanical and civil engineering. I
am just getting back into hobby electronics. I am working on some
mechatronics project at home in my free time and I'm prototyping with
off the shelf controllers, but my goal is to develop my own controller
and I am tempted to use the 8051 or a Z80. I'm leaning towards the 8051
because the DS89C4XX has everything I need and I have the components
from a sample pack I got almost a decade ago. I have a Z80 as well.


The 8051 is 40 years old, and the architecture was outdated before the
first chip was made. There have been some reasonable microcontrollers
made around it, despite it's horrendous core. And the Z80 was a fine
device 30 years ago.

What you are suggesting is like trying to build a car using a steam engine.

I can appreciate that there is some nostalgia in this for you, but I
really would recommend using newer hardware and software. Probably the
best choice for getting started would be an Arduino kit - there are lots
of base boards to choose from, lots of add-ons, lots of tutorials and
examples, and a reasonable IDE (which is free).


Guest

Mon Dec 17, 2018 11:45 pm   



On Monday, December 17, wrote:
Quote:
On Monday, December 17, 2018 at 9:31:21 AM UTC-5, David Brown wrote:
On 17/12/18 13:40, wrote:
I've spent hours searching and kept coming up empty. I've found all
of the manuals and all software through google, but that 8051
compiler just isn't easy. You are probably right that replying to old
emails etc is not going to get me far, but it is a resource and I'm
going to exhaust all of them. I'll look into the resources you have
provided.


A compiler is entirely different from a disassembler. You said "I am
looking for some disassemblers too. 8051 in particular". Now you say
you want a compiler. Which is it?

There are /lots/ of compiler for the 8051. Many commercial ones, and at
least one solid open source one. I don't know about disassemblers for
the core, having never needed to use one, but google finds plenty within
a few seconds.

You need to figure out what tool(s) you are actually looking for - or at
least figure out what you want to do with them. You need to figure out
whether you are dealing with the core in general, or specific devices,
whether you want commercial tools or free ones, and so on.

And if you want help from people, you will have to say what you have
tried so far and why those tools have been inappropriate. Otherwise no
one can help.

But as I say, please drop the "Google Groups" interface - it is
absolutely terrible for posting to Usenet (though it is okay for
searching archives). If you can't use a proper Usenet client, then at
least learn to use Google Groups properly - it's default options are
contrary to standard Usenet usage. (This is not your fault, it is
Google's fault - but it is you, the GG poster, who has to make the
effort.) Quote posts correctly, with attribution and appropriate
snipping, and split your lines correctly.

And then, when you have this figured out, post to comp.arch.embedded -
it is the best newsgroup for such tools. (comp.arch.fpga is a fine and
helpful group too, but c.a.e. will reach more 8051 users.)

My mistake on my prior reply. I did not intend to say compiler. I
meant to say disassembler. My mistake, human...

OK.


I get what you're saying about everything being on google, but it's a
tool not the means to an end. I'm trying to get my hands on the 8051
disassembler for the pm3585 logic analyzer. I'm trying to learn how to
debug the 8051 using the pm3585.


Is this for a history project, or a museum? Nobody has used a logic
analyser for microcontroller debugging for at least 20 years, probably more.


Now I have been out of the electronics/computer field for quite some
time and I had shifted my focus to mechanical and civil engineering. I
am just getting back into hobby electronics. I am working on some
mechatronics project at home in my free time and I'm prototyping with
off the shelf controllers, but my goal is to develop my own controller
and I am tempted to use the 8051 or a Z80. I'm leaning towards the 8051
because the DS89C4XX has everything I need and I have the components
from a sample pack I got almost a decade ago. I have a Z80 as well.


The 8051 is 40 years old, and the architecture was outdated before the
first chip was made. There have been some reasonable microcontrollers
made around it, despite it's horrendous core. And the Z80 was a fine
device 30 years ago.

What you are suggesting is like trying to build a car using a steam engine.

I can appreciate that there is some nostalgia in this for you, but I
really would recommend using newer hardware and software. Probably the
best choice for getting started would be an Arduino kit - there are lots
of base boards to choose from, lots of add-ons, lots of tutorials and
examples, and a reasonable IDE (which is free).


I see and I do agree. I just happen to have a load of these 8051 chips and other outdated pieces and I would rather put them to use than chuck them. I was eyeballing the arduino uno though.

I guess I'll just try to develop and if things get rough I'll just give it the old college try w or w/o disassembler. I'f I am careful I might be able, haha, to get away with a bug free piece.

Thanks for your interest in my problem

Nicolas Matringe
Guest

Tue Dec 18, 2018 10:45 pm   



On 17/12/2018 22:39, David Brown wrote:

Quote:
Is this for a history project, or a museum?  Nobody has used a logic
analyser for microcontroller debugging for at least 20 years, probably
more.


As a matter of fact I did 3 years ago. It was a Xilinx picoBlaze and
that was the only way I had to trace the execution. It was fun.

Nicolas

David Brown
Guest

Wed Dec 19, 2018 9:45 am   



On 18/12/18 21:50, Nicolas Matringe wrote:
Quote:
On 17/12/2018 22:39, David Brown wrote:

Is this for a history project, or a museum? Nobody has used a logic
analyser for microcontroller debugging for at least 20 years, probably
more.

As a matter of fact I did 3 years ago. It was a Xilinx picoBlaze and
that was the only way I had to trace the execution. It was fun.

Nicolas


I admit that "nobody" was an exaggeration. But it is has certainly
become very rare as a debugging technique.

Note that we are not talking about using a logic analyser for monitoring
the outputs from a microcontroller in order to find out if the program
is running correctly - lots of people do that. (Though they usually use
little USB-connected pods and PC software, rather than huge and
expensive dedicated machines.) This was about using a logic analyser to
trace the entire instruction stream - with a disassembler interpreting
the stream. It is something that could be done in the days of external
ROM for your code and simple, non-pipelined deterministic cpu cores.


Guest

Wed Dec 19, 2018 11:45 am   



I'll state my reason for using a dedicated machine. I do not like software based diagnostics. The problem comes when the developer stops updating the software. Then you need to buy new hardware and software. With a dedicated stand alone machines even after 20 years it works. To me it is a way to avoid getting cornered into license fees, obsolescence. I have Micro-Cap from back in the Dos days on a 5-1/4 floppy... I don't have a machine to run it but I have it.

That's why I like my hardware. I actually own it to rather than paying for the right to use (like most proprietary software).

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