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RobertMacy
Guest

Wed Apr 02, 2014 11:17 am   



On Tue, 01 Apr 2014 18:46:02 -0700, Jim Thompson
<To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon_at_on-my-web-site.com> wrote:

Quote:
On Tue, 01 Apr 2014 21:41:30 -0400, Martin Riddle
martin_rid_at_verizon.net> wrote:

...,snip....
The one miso recomends, its an actual stud finder, not a nail finder
has wire warning too.
http://www.zircon.com/
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Zircon-Corporation-Studsensor-I65-Onestep-Stud-Finder-61961/100615130#product_description

Cheers

Anyone have experience with this one...

http://tinyurl.com/kdonaw2

...Jim Thompson


I own a zircon and know the people while in the Bay Area. They generally
make good products.

I had planned on looking through plaster/lath to find studs, never got it
to work well, kept missing and had false positives and false negatives,
just didn't work well for me.

Best was a simple metal detector to find all the nails. $2.00 for a little
magnet that spun freely inside a plastic partially transparent cylinder. I
think Home Depot carries. Both are now in storage, so recently I used a
'stack' of neodynium magnets. But this is new construction and the skim
coats aren't that thick, thus often the magnets actually stuck to the
walls. use a magnet out of a defunct microwave.

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Thu Apr 03, 2014 7:57 am   



On Tue, 01 Apr 2014 18:44:01 -0700, Jim Thompson
<To-Email-Use-The-Envelope-Icon_at_On-My-Web-Site.com> wrote:

Quote:
Actually I need an accurate locator for those _joists_ in the wall
framing so I can hang some heavy tools.
...Jim Thompson


I have several stud finders (actually edge finders) made by Zircon.
The one I managed to find is a Studsensor i65. The LCD display is
much easier to use than a row of LEDs type.
<http://www.zircon.com/products/center_ss_i65.html>
<http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/261440455176>
Buy several so that when the neighbor borrows yours and doesn't return
it, you are still functional.

As someone mentioned previously, there can be problems dealing with
foil backed insulation if it is improperly installed. There is
suppose to be a small air gap between the foil and the back of the
drywall. That makes it easy for the stud finder to see the change in
density. However, if someone installed the insulation over the studs,
and then nailed the drywall over the edges, the aluminum will shield
the stud and the stud finder is not going to work. I've seen this
exactly once on an owner built home, so I wouldn't worry about it
much.

Hint: Heavy tools hit the ground rather hard. I suggest you store
them on shelves, where a crash landing isn't as likely.


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

Maynard A. Philbrook Jr.
Guest

Thu Apr 03, 2014 8:01 am   



In article <9o8pj99uv5qk1125gaaf7ebauo200fkd0p_at_4ax.com>,
jfields_at_austininstruments.com says...
Quote:
I hope you were never involved in any life saving
applications when you were in the job force..

---
That's just suicidal thinking.


I am glad you finally fest up to something.


And don't bother to reiterate on the original
thread, it obviously slid under your radar.

Jamie

Maynard A. Philbrook Jr.
Guest

Fri Apr 04, 2014 4:45 am   



In article <5vbqj91m8q6gigj6288pntk49mk3snllgb_at_4ax.com>,
jfields_at_austininstruments.com says...
Quote:

On Wed, 2 Apr 2014 21:01:54 -0500, "Maynard A. Philbrook Jr."
jamie_ka1lpa_at_charter.net> wrote:

In article <9o8pj99uv5qk1125gaaf7ebauo200fkd0p_at_4ax.com>,
jfields_at_austininstruments.com says...
I hope you were never involved in any life saving
applications when you were in the job force..

---
That's just suicidal thinking.


I am glad you finally fest up to something.

---
"Fest"???

Whoosh...
---

And don't bother to reiterate on the original
thread, it obviously slid under your radar.

Jamie

---
"Don't bother" obviously refers to your wish of not being held
accountable for bogus claims you've made and therefore can't
possibly back up, while your allusion to sliding under the radar is
your excuse for the imaginary "screw-up" you keep harping on not
causing a blip.

You could end your tawdry prolonging the agony of this thread by
simply pointing out Bloggs' alleged screw-up, but will you?

Of course not, since you can't.

Instead, you'd rather just keep on aimlessly typing, hoping against
hope that one day you'll be the one to have typed out the
Britannica.

news:a7bqj91jruphou4pg61aoasl6dj36ivt80_at_4ax.com

John Fields


Useless.

John Fields
Guest

Fri Apr 04, 2014 6:04 am   



On Thu, 3 Apr 2014 17:45:07 -0500, "Maynard A. Philbrook Jr."
<jamie_ka1lpa_at_charter.net> wrote:

Quote:
In article <5vbqj91m8q6gigj6288pntk49mk3snllgb_at_4ax.com>,
jfields_at_austininstruments.com says...

On Wed, 2 Apr 2014 21:01:54 -0500, "Maynard A. Philbrook Jr."
jamie_ka1lpa_at_charter.net> wrote:

In article <9o8pj99uv5qk1125gaaf7ebauo200fkd0p_at_4ax.com>,
jfields_at_austininstruments.com says...
I hope you were never involved in any life saving
applications when you were in the job force..

---
That's just suicidal thinking.


I am glad you finally fest up to something.

---
"Fest"???

Whoosh...
---

And don't bother to reiterate on the original
thread, it obviously slid under your radar.

Jamie

---
"Don't bother" obviously refers to your wish of not being held
accountable for bogus claims you've made and therefore can't
possibly back up, while your allusion to sliding under the radar is
your excuse for the imaginary "screw-up" you keep harping on not
causing a blip.

You could end your tawdry prolonging the agony of this thread by
simply pointing out Bloggs' alleged screw-up, but will you?

Of course not, since you can't.

Instead, you'd rather just keep on aimlessly typing, hoping against
hope that one day you'll be the one to have typed out the
Britannica.

news:a7bqj91jruphou4pg61aoasl6dj36ivt80_at_4ax.com

John Fields

Useless.


---
Well, I see some progress has been made in that your verbosity has
decreased substantially, albeit still being bereft of worthwhile
content.

Perhaps another shot or two will convince you to shut the fuck up
and rid us all of both problems.

John Fields

Michael A. Terrell
Guest

Thu Apr 17, 2014 7:54 am   



amdx wrote:
Quote:

On 4/11/2014 3:10 PM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

amdx wrote:

On 4/10/2014 12:49 PM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

I show them my VA card, and get their 10% Veteran's discount
off anything I buy.


Fingers Malone get's all his stuff free!


I don't want to know any thieves. I'm not a Democrat.


You really know how to hurt a guy. That is cruel name calling.

I'm so conservative, I would even include veterans benefits
in government cut backs.

I have a veteran friend that tells
me he has received over $1 million dollars in veteran retirement
benefits. He also says that doesn't include healthcare payments,
which because of the zipper up his chest, have been considerable.
I'm for an across the board cut in all government expenditures.
2% every year for 5 years would be a good start.
If under Obama, the real median household income dropped $2,627—or
4.89 percent—from 2008 to 2012*. Why should government wages go up.
Oh! sorry, but you started it. Smile


My VA Disability is $1046 a month, and that isn't retirement pay. I
am allowed no other income, at all. Even one dollar income would cost
me my medical care and that tiny pension. I don't know any Veteran who
got a million dollars, unless they won a lawsuit. It's damned near
impossible to win a lawsuit against the VA. Tell me how long you could
survive on $1046 a month? My 1979 pickup truck is falling apart. It
needs more in repairs than it cost, eight years ago. I have three
leaking roofs, and a bad tank on my well. The pump kicks on three times
to get one quart of water. Do you know what that will do to the pump? My
pension went up about 1% per year, and only some years. You're ignoring
the guarantee they give people entering the service of medical care and
disability benefits, in exchange for lower monthly pay while on active
duty, or in the reserves. Whine all you want, I'll consider the source.
$2,627 would be a 21% reduction for me.


--
Anyone wanting to run for any political office in the US should have to
have a DD214, and a honorable discharge.

---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com

Phil Hobbs
Guest

Sun Apr 27, 2014 6:45 am   



On 4/26/2014 8:24 PM, Jim Thompson wrote:
Quote:
On Sat, 26 Apr 2014 17:39:32 -0400, rickman <gnuarm_at_gmail.com> wrote:

On 4/26/2014 4:20 PM, Jim Thompson wrote:
On Sat, 26 Apr 2014 11:48:48 -0400, Phil Hobbs
hobbs_at_electrooptical.net> wrote:

On 4/26/2014 11:29 AM, Phil Hobbs wrote:
On 4/25/2014 1:18 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
[snip]

Run your own mail server at home. You'll need a static IP address
from your service provider, and a DNS MX record pointing to the static
IP addresses. There are various FreeBSD based mail servers that
should be suitable. If you're a Windoze fan and a masochist, you can
try Microsoft Exchange server. You'll also need a good spam filter
because your ISP will NOT be doing any spam filtering. I would guess
that about 90% of your incoming messages will probably be spam, so
you'll probably need to increase your bandwidth. The firewall can be
handled by the server, but I prefer dedicated hardware (pfSense).
Don't forget about backing up the server. Admin and security can be
outsourced to a reputable specialist, or the neighborhood hacker.

I don't agree. Hosting your own email is a time sink if you're going to
do it well, whereas it's easy to get reliable service with hosting
outfits. Having two mail accounts, with the main one forwarding copies
of everything to the backup one, protects you from most sorts of cloud
glitches, apart from the NSA. You can migrate all your own emails from
one to another using specialized migration outfits (it costs about $5).
(Change the passwords after migration.)

I should clarify--the two hosted accounts should be with different
companies. (Mine forwards from Rackspace to Gmail.)

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

Is Gmail OK... no labeling mail with "spam" like Cox does to every
other LTspice digest? No ads inserted?

Of course gmail can change their service at any time they wish, but the
emails I receive are not altered in any way other than the usual headers
added by servers which handle the messages (which can be useful when
attempting to track the source of emails). My outgoing email does not
go through gmail. It goes out through the hosting server.

How do you set up gmail for POP retrieval? Server name, settings,
etc?

...Jim Thompson

There are instructions on the site. Basically it's pop.googlemail.com,
port 995 on RX, and smtp.googlemail.com port 465 on TX.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
ElectroOptical Innovations LLC
Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics

160 North State Road #203
Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

hobbs at electrooptical dot net
http://electrooptical.net

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Sun Apr 27, 2014 7:10 am   



On Sat, 26 Apr 2014 11:29:08 -0400, Phil Hobbs
<hobbs_at_electrooptical.net> wrote:

Quote:
A catchall account allows you to give out any number of
"merchantname_at_yourdomain.com" addresses. They all wind up in the same
account, so you only need one.


That was a disaster when I tried it. Some moronic spammer was
pounding on my domain with every possible combination of user name. I
had to clean out something like 20,000 not quite identical spam
messages in one day. It's a good idea, but only if there is a filter
that only accepts email to addresses that I have already assigned. I
could do that by setting up an account for each
merchant_name_at_my_domain.com, and redirecting incoming email to a
single account to make reading it easier. I haven't done that because
there are just too many merchants with which I do business to make the
effort worthwhile. Looking at my password list (spreadsheet), I see
about 100 merchant accounts, which use my email address as a login
name, which means I have to keep those email account active
essentially forever. No thanks. Knowing which merchants are really
evil or insecure isn't worth the effort.

Quote:
Run your own mail server at home. You'll need a static IP address
from your service provider, and a DNS MX record pointing to the static
IP addresses. There are various FreeBSD based mail servers that
should be suitable. If you're a Windoze fan and a masochist, you can
try Microsoft Exchange server. You'll also need a good spam filter
because your ISP will NOT be doing any spam filtering. I would guess
that about 90% of your incoming messages will probably be spam, so
you'll probably need to increase your bandwidth. The firewall can be
handled by the server, but I prefer dedicated hardware (pfSense).
Don't forget about backing up the server. Admin and security can be
outsourced to a reputable specialist, or the neighborhood hacker.

I don't agree.


Neither do I. My suggestion to run a personal mail server was in
reply to Jim Thomson's problem of dealing with 100+ email addresses.
Having total control over the situation will work, but as you note,
the overhead is rather high. I never expected Jim to follow my
suggestion, but I did want to inform him what's involved in
implementing the solution.

Quote:
Hosting your own email is a time sink if you're going to
do it well, whereas it's easy to get reliable service with hosting
outfits.


Most (not all) email hosting and filtering services charge by the
account.

Quote:
Having two mail accounts, with the main one forwarding copies
of everything to the backup one, protects you from most sorts of cloud
glitches, apart from the NSA. You can migrate all your own emails from
one to another using specialized migration outfits (it costs about $5).
(Change the passwords after migration.)


I was doing something like that until recently. I got tired of
dealing with the spam, so I forwarded all my email to my Gmail
account, which then forwarded it to a 2nd email account. Nothing
would ever appear in my first account or on Gmail, but the 2nd account
was spam free. However, the risk of false positives became to high,
so I dismantled the mess. I currently use SpamCop:
<http://www.spamcop.net>
at $30/year per email address.

Quote:
The other thing is to use a POP3 client such as kmail (my fave) or
Thunderbird. That way you have N local copies of all your email on
different boxes, which makes you pretty well crash-proof locally as well.


I've used both POP3 and IMAP4 over the years for email. Each has
their advantages. For archival storage, POP3 is quite good. Have one
machine download everything, and leave about 2-4 weeks of email on the
server. That was fine when I read email on one or two machines. I
now have 3 PC's, 2 Mac's, 1 tablet, 1 smartphone, and a Chromebook (on
order), all of which are used to read and send email. Reading the
same email, and deleting the same spam eight times is a bit too much
duplication of effort. Actually, that became a problem when I added
my 3rd machine.

So, I switched from POP3 to IMAP4. I can login to any machine and see
my email exactly as it looks on any of the other machines. For
archival purposes, I have one machine collect about 1,000 messages,
which is saved to a local folder using Thunderbird. At that point,
those messages are no longer visible on the other machines. The only
downside is that moving from the active IMAP4 folders (inbox, sent,
trash, junk) to a local folder requires that the client re-download
all 1,000 messages from the server, even though all those messages are
present on the local machine. Dumb design, but unlikely to change.

However, IMAP4 does have a big weakness, which you hinted. If I
accidentally erase a message from one machine, it disappears from the
server mail store, and from all the other machines. When that
happens, I just fire up one of the other machines without being
connected to the internet, so that it will NOT sync the folders, and
extract the missing message. So far, I've only had to do that about
twice in the last 3 years.

Drivel: Sorry about mis-guessing the number of working days per year.
Instead of doing the arithmetic, I fished the wrong number out of my
rapidly fading memory.

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

rickman
Guest

Sun Apr 27, 2014 8:10 am   



On 4/26/2014 8:24 PM, Jim Thompson wrote:
Quote:
On Sat, 26 Apr 2014 17:39:32 -0400, rickman <gnuarm_at_gmail.com> wrote:

On 4/26/2014 4:20 PM, Jim Thompson wrote:
On Sat, 26 Apr 2014 11:48:48 -0400, Phil Hobbs
hobbs_at_electrooptical.net> wrote:

On 4/26/2014 11:29 AM, Phil Hobbs wrote:
On 4/25/2014 1:18 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
[snip]

Run your own mail server at home. You'll need a static IP address
from your service provider, and a DNS MX record pointing to the static
IP addresses. There are various FreeBSD based mail servers that
should be suitable. If you're a Windoze fan and a masochist, you can
try Microsoft Exchange server. You'll also need a good spam filter
because your ISP will NOT be doing any spam filtering. I would guess
that about 90% of your incoming messages will probably be spam, so
you'll probably need to increase your bandwidth. The firewall can be
handled by the server, but I prefer dedicated hardware (pfSense).
Don't forget about backing up the server. Admin and security can be
outsourced to a reputable specialist, or the neighborhood hacker.

I don't agree. Hosting your own email is a time sink if you're going to
do it well, whereas it's easy to get reliable service with hosting
outfits. Having two mail accounts, with the main one forwarding copies
of everything to the backup one, protects you from most sorts of cloud
glitches, apart from the NSA. You can migrate all your own emails from
one to another using specialized migration outfits (it costs about $5).
(Change the passwords after migration.)

I should clarify--the two hosted accounts should be with different
companies. (Mine forwards from Rackspace to Gmail.)

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

Is Gmail OK... no labeling mail with "spam" like Cox does to every
other LTspice digest? No ads inserted?

Of course gmail can change their service at any time they wish, but the
emails I receive are not altered in any way other than the usual headers
added by servers which handle the messages (which can be useful when
attempting to track the source of emails). My outgoing email does not
go through gmail. It goes out through the hosting server.

How do you set up gmail for POP retrieval? Server name, settings,
etc?


I don't know, that's not what I did. I set gmail to forward the mail
back to my domain. The main reason I did this was to make it easy to
cut gmail out of the path if any problems develop. Just change the
forward to gmail to the same email address gmail was forwarding to and
you are done. Nothing else has to change anywhere.

I recommend that you do it this way, but I think you can set gmail as
your POP server. A friend who uses an iPhone does that I seem to
recall. The client on his phone checks email from several sources
including gmail and hotmail. He is very non technical so I'm sure it
isn't hard. I believe there are instructions in the gmail setup page.

--

Rick

rickman
Guest

Sun Apr 27, 2014 8:27 am   



On 4/26/2014 9:10 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
Quote:
On Sat, 26 Apr 2014 11:29:08 -0400, Phil Hobbs
hobbs_at_electrooptical.net> wrote:

A catchall account allows you to give out any number of
"merchantname_at_yourdomain.com" addresses. They all wind up in the same
account, so you only need one.

That was a disaster when I tried it. Some moronic spammer was
pounding on my domain with every possible combination of user name. I
had to clean out something like 20,000 not quite identical spam
messages in one day. It's a good idea, but only if there is a filter
that only accepts email to addresses that I have already assigned. I
could do that by setting up an account for each
merchant_name_at_my_domain.com, and redirecting incoming email to a
single account to make reading it easier. I haven't done that because
there are just too many merchants with which I do business to make the
effort worthwhile. Looking at my password list (spreadsheet), I see
about 100 merchant accounts, which use my email address as a login
name, which means I have to keep those email account active
essentially forever. No thanks. Knowing which merchants are really
evil or insecure isn't worth the effort.


Bingo! That is *exactly* what I do. No real work. Each time I give
out an email address to a vendor (meaning virtually any web page I'm not
giving a spam catcher yahoo address) I take the 15 seconds to add an
alias to the website emailbox. The address is usually
domain.com_at_mydomain.com so it's not like it is hard to remember. I also
get some interesting responses when they are viewed by a human.
Sometimes they contact me by phone because they think it must be a
mixup, lol. Ok, I guess if you are busy this is a bother, but it is way
below my threshold of pain. :)


....snip...

Quote:
Hosting your own email is a time sink if you're going to
do it well, whereas it's easy to get reliable service with hosting
outfits.

Most (not all) email hosting and filtering services charge by the
account.


My account is about $60 a year and is for hosting multiple web sites
with no stated limitations. At one time I had a site with multiple TB
of data flow per month and no complaints. Certainly email addresses
aren't charged separately. Heck, they don't even know how many I have.


Quote:
Having two mail accounts, with the main one forwarding copies
of everything to the backup one, protects you from most sorts of cloud
glitches, apart from the NSA. You can migrate all your own emails from
one to another using specialized migration outfits (it costs about $5).
(Change the passwords after migration.)


That is an excellent idea. I can set up a mailbox to forward the emails
to two other accounts, one pulled off regularly by my main computer and
the other pulled off intermittently by a backup computer. The only
glitch is the lack of backup of the outgoing emails without manually
CCing the backup account. :(


Quote:
I was doing something like that until recently. I got tired of
dealing with the spam, so I forwarded all my email to my Gmail
account, which then forwarded it to a 2nd email account. Nothing
would ever appear in my first account or on Gmail, but the 2nd account
was spam free. However, the risk of false positives became to high,
so I dismantled the mess. I currently use SpamCop:
http://www.spamcop.net
at $30/year per email address.

The other thing is to use a POP3 client such as kmail (my fave) or
Thunderbird. That way you have N local copies of all your email on
different boxes, which makes you pretty well crash-proof locally as well.

I've used both POP3 and IMAP4 over the years for email. Each has
their advantages. For archival storage, POP3 is quite good. Have one
machine download everything, and leave about 2-4 weeks of email on the
server. That was fine when I read email on one or two machines. I
now have 3 PC's, 2 Mac's, 1 tablet, 1 smartphone, and a Chromebook (on
order), all of which are used to read and send email. Reading the
same email, and deleting the same spam eight times is a bit too much
duplication of effort. Actually, that became a problem when I added
my 3rd machine.


How did the messages get deleted from the server? Was that manual or
did you fire up one machine in particular that was set up to delete when
downloading? But that could delete a brand new message from the server.
I get too many emails a day to deal with the manual deletion from the
server for that to work unless I am missing something.


Quote:
So, I switched from POP3 to IMAP4. I can login to any machine and see
my email exactly as it looks on any of the other machines. For
archival purposes, I have one machine collect about 1,000 messages,
which is saved to a local folder using Thunderbird. At that point,
those messages are no longer visible on the other machines. The only
downside is that moving from the active IMAP4 folders (inbox, sent,
trash, junk) to a local folder requires that the client re-download
all 1,000 messages from the server, even though all those messages are
present on the local machine. Dumb design, but unlikely to change.

However, IMAP4 does have a big weakness, which you hinted. If I
accidentally erase a message from one machine, it disappears from the
server mail store, and from all the other machines. When that
happens, I just fire up one of the other machines without being
connected to the internet, so that it will NOT sync the folders, and
extract the missing message. So far, I've only had to do that about
twice in the last 3 years.


The other limitation to IMAP is the lack of syncing the outbound emails.
Or is that something that IMAP4 does which I am not aware of?

Right now I am using Eudora and backup the email folders to an external
hard drive. I lost a computer... my only real computer back in
November. It took me a while to get it all set up and working but I
didn't lose a thing. Smile Of course the ultimate backup was the laptop
hard drive itself. I pulled it out and put it in an external USB case.
There were a couple of files that were corrupted, but nothing
significant. All the important stuff was on the 3 TB external drive.

--

Rick

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Sun Apr 27, 2014 9:04 am   



On Sat, 26 Apr 2014 22:27:00 -0400, rickman <gnuarm_at_gmail.com> wrote:

Quote:
I've used both POP3 and IMAP4 over the years for email. Each has
their advantages. For archival storage, POP3 is quite good. Have one
machine download everything, and leave about 2-4 weeks of email on the
server. That was fine when I read email on one or two machines. I
now have 3 PC's, 2 Mac's, 1 tablet, 1 smartphone, and a Chromebook (on
order), all of which are used to read and send email. Reading the
same email, and deleting the same spam eight times is a bit too much
duplication of effort. Actually, that became a problem when I added
my 3rd machine.

How did the messages get deleted from the server? Was that manual or
did you fire up one machine in particular that was set up to delete when
downloading?


Totally manual. When I open a MUA (mail user agent), the first thing
I do is manually check off everything that looks like spam and hit
delete. In Thunderbird, that moves them into the Trash folder. Before
I exit the program, I take a look in the Trash to make sure there's
nothing in there that doesn't belong. That works fine during normal
working hours. It's not so reliable when I'm half asleep, overworked,
stressed, or in a rush. Much as I would like to automate the process,
the risk automagically deleting something important is too high.

Incidentally, some of my clueless friends and customers don't really
know how to write email. Looking for an example to emulate, they
often copy the style and formatting of the spam their receiving.
Fairly soon, I'm getting email from them that looks very much like
spam.

> But that could delete a brand new message from the server.

Yep. That's the problem. Hit delete and it's gone everywhere.

Quote:
I get too many emails a day to deal with the manual deletion from the
server for that to work unless I am missing something.


I once timed myself and found that I was spending about 1 to 2 minutes
per session dealing with manually deleting the spam. My ISP does a
good job with the obvious spam, but isn't perfect. I do the rest. I
read email about 6 times per day. That's 12 minutes maximum, which I
think is tolerable.

Quote:
The other limitation to IMAP is the lack of syncing the outbound emails.
Or is that something that IMAP4 does which I am not aware of?


Huh? My Sent folder is synced on all my IMAP4 accounts. That's
standard. More complicated is syncing Trash and Drafts. That's
usually an optional setting. Syncing drafts is fairly important for
me as I'll start an email in the office, and then finish it on my home
computer.

Quote:
Right now I am using Eudora and backup the email folders to an external
hard drive.


If it's the OSE version of Eudora, it's basically an old version of
Thunderbird in disguise.
<https://wiki.mozilla.org/Eudora_OSE>
I suggest you use the native Thunderbird application, which is quite
similar to the original Eudora.

Quote:
I lost a computer... my only real computer back in
November. It took me a while to get it all set up and working but I
didn't lose a thing. Smile Of course the ultimate backup was the laptop
hard drive itself. I pulled it out and put it in an external USB case.
There were a couple of files that were corrupted, but nothing
significant. All the important stuff was on the 3 TB external drive.


I think we've been through this in this newsgroup before. Do image
backups with one of several free or paid programs. I use Acronis True
Image 2013 ($50). Between image backups, copy off files that have
changed with whatever backup program handles incremental backups by
date. Part of my collection:
<http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/crud/backup-drvies.jpg>
There are about 8 more scattered around. Most are 1TB.

So, what are you going to do if your 3TB external drive gets trashed?
I had it happen when I was playing with a "cleanup" utility, that
decided to "cleanup" the external USB drive by deleting important
files. I had to use an unerase utility to recover. Grrrr...



--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

rickman
Guest

Sun Apr 27, 2014 11:35 am   



On 4/26/2014 11:04 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
Quote:
On Sat, 26 Apr 2014 22:27:00 -0400, rickman <gnuarm_at_gmail.com> wrote:

I've used both POP3 and IMAP4 over the years for email. Each has
their advantages. For archival storage, POP3 is quite good. Have one
machine download everything, and leave about 2-4 weeks of email on the
server. That was fine when I read email on one or two machines. I
now have 3 PC's, 2 Mac's, 1 tablet, 1 smartphone, and a Chromebook (on
order), all of which are used to read and send email. Reading the
same email, and deleting the same spam eight times is a bit too much
duplication of effort. Actually, that became a problem when I added
my 3rd machine.

How did the messages get deleted from the server? Was that manual or
did you fire up one machine in particular that was set up to delete when
downloading?

Totally manual. When I open a MUA (mail user agent), the first thing
I do is manually check off everything that looks like spam and hit
delete. In Thunderbird, that moves them into the Trash folder. Before
I exit the program, I take a look in the Trash to make sure there's
nothing in there that doesn't belong. That works fine during normal
working hours. It's not so reliable when I'm half asleep, overworked,
stressed, or in a rush. Much as I would like to automate the process,
the risk automagically deleting something important is too high.

Incidentally, some of my clueless friends and customers don't really
know how to write email. Looking for an example to emulate, they
often copy the style and formatting of the spam their receiving.
Fairly soon, I'm getting email from them that looks very much like
spam.

But that could delete a brand new message from the server.

Yep. That's the problem. Hit delete and it's gone everywhere.


I think we are on different wavelengths here. Are you saying that all
of your email remains on the server forever using IMAP? My intent was
to use one computer to download the mail via POP and delete it while the
others all just downloaded using POP it without deleting. The trick is
to synchronize them so the deleting computer always ran last. I was
never confident about this so I've never done it and just do email on
one computer. As I also mentioned, this doesn't do anything for sent
emails nor does using IMAP.


Quote:
I get too many emails a day to deal with the manual deletion from the
server for that to work unless I am missing something.

I once timed myself and found that I was spending about 1 to 2 minutes
per session dealing with manually deleting the spam. My ISP does a
good job with the obvious spam, but isn't perfect. I do the rest. I
read email about 6 times per day. That's 12 minutes maximum, which I
think is tolerable.


I'm not talking about the spam. The other problem with keeping all the
emails on the server is the inability to see them unless you are online.
I use a laptop and there are times I can't get a connection, like at a
customer's site where they aren't keen to grant Internet access, mostly
due to issues of getting to the right person to turn it on. I can at
least read emails if they are on my computer.


Quote:
The other limitation to IMAP is the lack of syncing the outbound emails.
Or is that something that IMAP4 does which I am not aware of?

Huh? My Sent folder is synced on all my IMAP4 accounts. That's
standard.


I don't follow. I've never found a way to put email in a "folder" using
IMAP. I guess there is something I need to learn.


Quote:
More complicated is syncing Trash and Drafts. That's
usually an optional setting. Syncing drafts is fairly important for
me as I'll start an email in the office, and then finish it on my home
computer.


So these folders are on the email server? Sounds a bit like cloud storage.


Quote:
Right now I am using Eudora and backup the email folders to an external
hard drive.

If it's the OSE version of Eudora, it's basically an old version of
Thunderbird in disguise.
https://wiki.mozilla.org/Eudora_OSE
I suggest you use the native Thunderbird application, which is quite
similar to the original Eudora.


Uh, you have it backwards. OSE *is* Thunderbird, just with some sort of
a GUI app to make it look like Eudora. I think I tried it once and
hated it so I never "upgraded". I am using the original Eudora which is
*nothing* like Thunderbird (the program I am typing this on) and love
it. They will have to pry it from my cold dead hands. :(


Quote:
I lost a computer... my only real computer back in
November. It took me a while to get it all set up and working but I
didn't lose a thing. Smile Of course the ultimate backup was the laptop
hard drive itself. I pulled it out and put it in an external USB case.
There were a couple of files that were corrupted, but nothing
significant. All the important stuff was on the 3 TB external drive.

I think we've been through this in this newsgroup before. Do image
backups with one of several free or paid programs. I use Acronis True
Image 2013 ($50). Between image backups, copy off files that have
changed with whatever backup program handles incremental backups by
date. Part of my collection:
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/crud/backup-drvies.jpg
There are about 8 more scattered around. Most are 1TB.

So, what are you going to do if your 3TB external drive gets trashed?
I had it happen when I was playing with a "cleanup" utility, that
decided to "cleanup" the external USB drive by deleting important
files. I had to use an unerase utility to recover. Grrrr...


I don't play with utilities. But if the 3 TB drive is lost, I get a new
one and start over. I won't have lost anything unless my laptop goes
south at the same time.

I do have some 40 GB of map data I've never moved over to my laptop. I
need to copy that over too some day. But then that is also still on the
HD from the old laptop in an unknown condition of course. I can
read/write the old drive, but it has its own issues and was going bad
before the laptop died.

I still haven't gotten used to Win8. Who is the idiot who thought it
was a good idea to get rid of the start menu? How about providing a
"classic" interface option for those of us who aren't using a tablet or
a touch screen on their laptop? What a stupid idea.

--

Rick


Guest

Wed May 21, 2014 9:32 am   



On Wednesday, May 7, 2014 1:27:29 PM UTC-7, Jim Thompson wrote:
Quote:
This new, very well-insulated, foil-backed, house has one drawback...

the garage door opener range with the garage door closed is only about

20'



Any ideas on how I could extend that range?



...Jim Thompson

--

| James E.Thompson | mens |

| Analog Innovations | et |

| Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus |

| San Tan Valley, AZ 85142 Skype: Contacts Only | |

| Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat |

| E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 |



I love to cook with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



On Wednesday, May 7, 2014 1:27:29 PM UTC-7, Jim Thompson wrote:
Quote:
This new, very well-insulated, foil-backed, house has one drawback...

the garage door opener range with the garage door closed is only about

20'



Any ideas on how I could extend that range?



...Jim Thompson

--

| James E.Thompson | mens |

| Analog Innovations | et |

| Analog/Mixed-Signal ASIC's and Discrete Systems | manus |

| San Tan Valley, AZ 85142 Skype: Contacts Only | |

| Voice:(480)460-2350 Fax: Available upon request | Brass Rat |

| E-mail Icon at http://www.analog-innovations.com | 1962 |



I love to cook with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.


Joe Gwinn
Guest

Sun Jun 01, 2014 8:32 am   



In article <lm5dtg$o13$1_at_dont-email.me>, Tim Williams
<tmoranwms_at_charter.net> wrote:

Quote:
"RobertMacy" <robert.a.macy_at_gmail.com> wrote in message
news:op.xgksy1ym2cx0wh_at_ajm...
Exactly where is a good description for all these options?

...Let alone how to use them?

Stuff like GEAR is well documented by most SPICE descriptions, and
computational solvers in general; it's their word for Runge-Kutta of order
MAXORD. Note that TRAP (trapezoidal, i.e. Newton's Method, more or less)
is essentially RK1.


For even more information, consult books on numerical methods,
especially numerical solution of differential equations.

Also books on linear algebra, especially numerical methods.


Quote:
I very rarely use TRAP in my simulations because the settling is poor and
erratic (the result is a distinctive alternation, every other timestep, of
a given variable about its ideal value -- it looks like triangles when
zoomed), particularly for nonlinear (switching) circuits. Occasionally, I
find RK4 (GEAR, MAXORD = 4) beneficial: the average timestep is calculated
much more slowly (more derivatives to compute), but the worst-cases are
much better -- it's not digging as deep (constantly redoing a bad
calculation at progressively smaller timesteps) or as often, around
strongly nonlinear events (such as switching edges), so the overall
simulation can run faster (and more stable -- less likely to get stuck on
a randomly too-small timestep).

I don't believe I've ever seen GEAR2 produce "bobbling" results; either it
settles asyptotically, or the oscillation is really there (as evidenced by
finding a smooth sinusoidal oscillation after setting smaller RELTOL
and/or max. timestep to enhance detail).

As for "how to use", judging by the dearth of instructions or even useful
documentation on most SPICE settings, I can only assume three things:

1. Don't touch that, you'll screw it up! Use the default settings! If it
starts throwing errors, the circuit /must/ be impossible!
2. Play with all of them and see what works. Life is a journey, or
something.
3. I know what works, but I'm not going to tell you.

Against the apparent collective wisdom of all three, I dare suggest these,
which seem to work well enough (these are in Multisim, which is your basic
XSPICE backend):
http://seventransistorlabs.com/Images/SimSettings1.png
http://seventransistorlabs.com/Images/SimSettings2.png
http://seventransistorlabs.com/Images/SimSettings3.png
but not all are available in LTSpice, so YMMV.

The most obscure setting of them all seems to be pivot (PIVREL, PIVTOL).
It's purely a computational thing, and of the few references I can find to
it, the only sentiment is "does nothing, leave it alone". Yet I've had
more than a few failing circuits fixed by setting a more strict (larger)
value, like as shown. I dare someone to explain that.


They are most likely talking about pivoting, which is done in the
solution of linear equations by gaussian elimination. Spice solves a
linear equation at each time step.

If these are really absolute and relative tolerances (as the names
would suggest), I doubt that larger values are more strict. Making
these tolerances larger makes the algorithm less fussy.

Anyway, it's a long story, but the system matrixes that describe
circuitry are quite nonlinear (all those semiconductors!) and are often
ill-conditioned (and thus very sensitive to tiny errors). A lot of
this is in Nagel's PhD thesis, the founding document of SPICE, although
SPICE has evolved considerably since then.

...<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SPICE>

Joe Gwinn

Tim Williams
Guest

Sun Jun 01, 2014 9:52 am   



"Joe Gwinn" <joegwinn_at_comcast.net> wrote in message
news:310520142232300925%joegwinn_at_comcast.net...
Quote:
The most obscure setting of them all seems to be pivot (PIVREL,
PIVTOL).
It's purely a computational thing, and of the few references I can find
to
it, the only sentiment is "does nothing, leave it alone". Yet I've had
more than a few failing circuits fixed by setting a more strict
(larger)
value, like as shown. I dare someone to explain that.

They are most likely talking about pivoting, which is done in the
solution of linear equations by gaussian elimination. Spice solves a
linear equation at each time step.

If these are really absolute and relative tolerances (as the names
would suggest), I doubt that larger values are more strict. Making
these tolerances larger makes the algorithm less fussy.


Oops, I probably had "less strict" or "more relaxed" in my mind when
typing that. Or, you know how it is when talking about loading with
resistance (a reciprocal quantity). :)

Quote:
Anyway, it's a long story, but the system matrixes that describe
circuitry are quite nonlinear (all those semiconductors!) and are often
ill-conditioned (and thus very sensitive to tiny errors). A lot of
this is in Nagel's PhD thesis, the founding document of SPICE, although
SPICE has evolved considerably since then.

..<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SPICE


If it has evolved significantly, then why haven't partial-matrix
tiumestepping methods and such trickled down to our level yet? :)

My understanding of the average commercial offering is, they either start
with 3f5, which was the last and most useful Berkeley version, or XSpice,
which includes digital models and a couple more convergence hacks (I think
it introduced Gmin stepping..?). And apply their own proprietary mods
from there (PSpice with more functions and weird syntax; HSpice with even
more, and some more convergence I think, and those fucking encrypted
models; LTSpice with multithreading, also encrypted models; etc.), with a
graphical schematic capture and graphing and postprocessor tossed in
front. And ALL the low to mid level software (OrCAD, Altium, etc.)
resides at this level and there is simply no core development or
competition beyond that level. Which it seems to me, if it weren't for
the grace of academia having written SPICE for free, these companies
wouldn't give less than two shits abuut putting simulation in their
products at all!

Tim

--
Seven Transistor Labs
Electrical Engineering Consultation
Website: http://seventransistorlabs.com

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