EDAboard.com | EDAboard.de | EDAboard.co.uk | WTWH Media

Dyson cyclone puzzle

Ask a question - edaboard.com

elektroda.net NewsGroups Forum Index - Repair Electronics - Dyson cyclone puzzle

Goto page 1, 2  Next


Guest

Wed Jan 16, 2019 9:45 pm   



Dyson DC50, a lightweight ok but nothing spectacular machine except the air passages are too narrow.

Suction of dirt from the floor head is very poor. Hoses checked clear, changeover mechanism works correctly, head is unblocked, brush roll works fine, cyclone has been washed out, top filter washed out & output filter removed for now until it works right, then I can put it back but not sure I will.

So I tried to disassemble the cyclone without luck. Removed outer bin. Released all the tabs on the mesh unit that surrounds the central core, but one part of it would not budge out no matter what. I can't see why, and there seems no other route to get into the cyclone assembly. Any ideas? I'm a bit fed up with it.


NT

Jeff Layman
Guest

Wed Jan 16, 2019 11:45 pm   



On 16/01/19 20:26, tabbypurr_at_gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
Dyson DC50, a lightweight ok but nothing spectacular machine except the air passages are too narrow.

Suction of dirt from the floor head is very poor. Hoses checked clear, changeover mechanism works correctly, head is unblocked, brush roll works fine, cyclone has been washed out, top filter washed out & output filter removed for now until it works right, then I can put it back but not sure I will.

So I tried to disassemble the cyclone without luck. Removed outer bin. Released all the tabs on the mesh unit that surrounds the central core, but one part of it would not budge out no matter what. I can't see why, and there seems no other route to get into the cyclone assembly. Any ideas? I'm a bit fed up with it.


Go to your local tip(s) and see if there is another DC50 there (there
seemed to be more Dysons than other makes when I dropped off some
electronic junk at my local tip last week). If there is one, ask the tip
operators if you can have one of the cyclones to (a) swap with your one
or (b) try to take apart. If the cyclones have no scrap value, there
shouldn't be a reason why they won't let you take it.

--

Jeff


Guest

Thu Jan 17, 2019 4:45 am   



On Wednesday, January 16, 2019 at 3:26:34 PM UTC-5, tabb...@gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
Dyson DC50, a lightweight ok but nothing spectacular machine except the air passages are too narrow.

Suction of dirt from the floor head is very poor. Hoses checked clear, changeover mechanism works correctly, head is unblocked, brush roll works fine, cyclone has been washed out, top filter washed out & output filter removed for now until it works right, then I can put it back but not sure I will..

So I tried to disassemble the cyclone without luck. Removed outer bin. Released all the tabs on the mesh unit that surrounds the central core, but one part of it would not budge out no matter what. I can't see why, and there seems no other route to get into the cyclone assembly. Any ideas? I'm a bit fed up with it.


I once heard that thread and other bits of fabric can get caught up in the moving parts and melt if synthetic. I wonder what gets that out without a disassembly?

pfjw@aol.com
Guest

Thu Jan 17, 2019 1:45 pm   



On Wednesday, January 16, 2019 at 10:40:52 PM UTC-5, bruce2...@gmail.com wrote:

> I once heard that thread and other bits of fabric can get caught up in the moving parts and melt if synthetic. I wonder what gets that out without a disassembly?

Disassembly. But with a Dyson, that is not very difficult. In the 12 years we have had our unit, I have torn it down twice for general cleaning. takes about an hour from start-to-finish, and does make a difference.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA


Guest

Thu Jan 17, 2019 10:45 pm   



On Wednesday, 16 January 2019 22:08:11 UTC, Jeff Layman wrote:
Quote:
On 16/01/19 20:26, tabbypurr wrote:

Dyson DC50, a lightweight ok but nothing spectacular machine except the air passages are too narrow.

Suction of dirt from the floor head is very poor. Hoses checked clear, changeover mechanism works correctly, head is unblocked, brush roll works fine, cyclone has been washed out, top filter washed out & output filter removed for now until it works right, then I can put it back but not sure I will.

So I tried to disassemble the cyclone without luck. Removed outer bin. Released all the tabs on the mesh unit that surrounds the central core, but one part of it would not budge out no matter what. I can't see why, and there seems no other route to get into the cyclone assembly. Any ideas? I'm a bit fed up with it.

Go to your local tip(s) and see if there is another DC50 there (there
seemed to be more Dysons than other makes when I dropped off some
electronic junk at my local tip last week). If there is one, ask the tip
operators if you can have one of the cyclones to (a) swap with your one
or (b) try to take apart. If the cyclones have no scrap value, there
shouldn't be a reason why they won't let you take it.


Sadly getting stuff from dumps has been impossible for many years here.


NT

Jeff Layman
Guest

Fri Jan 18, 2019 9:45 am   



On 17/01/19 21:17, tabbypurr_at_gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
On Wednesday, 16 January 2019 22:08:11 UTC, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 16/01/19 20:26, tabbypurr wrote:

Dyson DC50, a lightweight ok but nothing spectacular machine except the air passages are too narrow.

Suction of dirt from the floor head is very poor. Hoses checked clear, changeover mechanism works correctly, head is unblocked, brush roll works fine, cyclone has been washed out, top filter washed out & output filter removed for now until it works right, then I can put it back but not sure I will.

So I tried to disassemble the cyclone without luck. Removed outer bin. Released all the tabs on the mesh unit that surrounds the central core, but one part of it would not budge out no matter what. I can't see why, and there seems no other route to get into the cyclone assembly. Any ideas? I'm a bit fed up with it.

Go to your local tip(s) and see if there is another DC50 there (there
seemed to be more Dysons than other makes when I dropped off some
electronic junk at my local tip last week). If there is one, ask the tip
operators if you can have one of the cyclones to (a) swap with your one
or (b) try to take apart. If the cyclones have no scrap value, there
shouldn't be a reason why they won't let you take it.

Sadly getting stuff from dumps has been impossible for many years here.


Really? You'll just have to get Sarah Moore involved. Wink
<https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06bhwvy>

--

Jeff

Percival P. Cassidy
Guest

Fri Jan 18, 2019 6:45 pm   



On 1/16/19 5:08 PM, Jeff Layman wrote:

Quote:
Dyson DC50, a lightweight ok but nothing spectacular machine except
the air passages are too narrow.

Suction of dirt from the floor head is very poor. Hoses checked clear,
changeover mechanism works correctly, head is unblocked, brush roll
works fine, cyclone has been washed out, top filter washed out &
output filter removed for now until it works right, then I can put it
back but not sure I will.

So I tried to disassemble the cyclone without luck. Removed outer bin.
Released all the tabs on the mesh unit that surrounds the central
core, but one part of it would not budge out no matter what. I can't
see why, and there seems no other route to get into the cyclone
assembly. Any ideas? I'm a bit fed up with it.

Go to your local tip(s) and see if there is another DC50 there (there
seemed to be more Dysons than other makes when I dropped off some
electronic junk at my local tip last week).


A family member living an a wealthy American suburb says he has picked
up numerous Dysons left by the curb for the trash or recycling
collectors -- and all that was wrong with them was that the filter
needed cleaning.

Quote:
If there is one, ask the tip
operators if you can have one of the cyclones to (a) swap with your one
or (b) try to take apart. If the cyclones have no scrap value, there
shouldn't be a reason why they won't let you take it.


Perce


Guest

Fri Jan 18, 2019 8:45 pm   



Percival P. Cassidy wrote: "A family member living an a wealthy American suburb says he has picked
up numerous Dysons left by the curb for the trash or recycling
collectors -- and all that was wrong with them was that the filter
needed cleaning. "

That's the number one reason people go through so many
vaccum cleaners in one decade: They simply refuse to
consider emptying the rubbish out and/or cleaning the damn
filers! So easy!


Guest

Fri Jan 18, 2019 9:45 pm   



On Friday, January 18, 2019 at 2:11:58 PM UTC-5, thekma...@gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
Percival P. Cassidy wrote: "A family member living an a wealthy American suburb says he has picked
up numerous Dysons left by the curb for the trash or recycling
collectors -- and all that was wrong with them was that the filter
needed cleaning. "

That's the number one reason people go through so many
vaccum cleaners in one decade: They simply refuse to
consider emptying the rubbish out and/or cleaning the damn
filers! So easy!


Imagine if people got new cars just because it was time to change the oil.

Martin Gregorie
Guest

Fri Jan 18, 2019 10:45 pm   



On Fri, 18 Jan 2019 20:57:50 +0000, Cursitor Doom wrote:

Quote:
It's amazing the amount of perfectly good stuff that gets junked just
for the want of a part costing a few pennies. That's the thing these
days; too many people just go and buy another one.

These days too many people have no experience of building anything -
didn't have Meccano/Erector sets, let alone built model aircraft or
crystal sets, so have no clue about making or fixing things.

Dyson relevance: I have an original Dyson 05 cylinder model. After a year
or three the surprisingly weak green clip at the bottom of the wand
broke. A pivot came off one side of the catch. Being a long-time model
builder and flyer, I naturally stuck a 3mm drill through the pivots,
fitted a suitable length of 3mm OD brass tube and added epoxy to keep it
in place. 25-30 years later the Dyson is still working well, which is
more than I could say about the couple of Mr. Henry's it replaced.


--
Martin | martin at
Gregorie | gregorie dot org

Cursitor Doom
Guest

Fri Jan 18, 2019 10:45 pm   



On Fri, 18 Jan 2019 12:40:18 -0500, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Quote:
A family member living an a wealthy American suburb says he has picked
up numerous Dysons left by the curb for the trash or recycling
collectors -- and all that was wrong with them was that the filter
needed cleaning.


It's amazing the amount of perfectly good stuff that gets junked just for
the want of a part costing a few pennies. That's the thing these days;
too many people just go and buy another one.





--
This message may be freely reproduced without limit or charge only via
the Usenet protocol. Reproduction in whole or part through other
protocols, whether for profit or not, is conditional upon a charge of
GBP10.00 per reproduction. Publication in this manner via non-Usenet
protocols constitutes acceptance of this condition.

Percival P. Cassidy
Guest

Fri Jan 18, 2019 11:45 pm   



On 1/18/19 3:57 PM, Cursitor Doom wrote:

Quote:
A family member living an a wealthy American suburb says he has picked
up numerous Dysons left by the curb for the trash or recycling
collectors -- and all that was wrong with them was that the filter
needed cleaning.

It's amazing the amount of perfectly good stuff that gets junked just for
the want of a part costing a few pennies. That's the thing these days;
too many people just go and buy another one.


Undoubtedly true, but not all parts do cost just a few pennies. E.g.,
today I saw that one little electronic module for our Maytag dryer sells
for $358 -- and I'm not sure we paid much more than $400 for the whole
appliance about three years ago. I'm glad I don't need one: I just
happened to notice it while looking for something else.

Perce


Guest

Sat Jan 19, 2019 12:45 am   



On Friday, 18 January 2019 21:57:11 UTC, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:
Quote:
On 1/18/19 3:57 PM, Cursitor Doom wrote:

A family member living an a wealthy American suburb says he has picked
up numerous Dysons left by the curb for the trash or recycling
collectors -- and all that was wrong with them was that the filter
needed cleaning.

It's amazing the amount of perfectly good stuff that gets junked just for
the want of a part costing a few pennies. That's the thing these days;
too many people just go and buy another one.

Undoubtedly true, but not all parts do cost just a few pennies. E.g.,
today I saw that one little electronic module for our Maytag dryer sells
for $358 -- and I'm not sure we paid much more than $400 for the whole
appliance about three years ago. I'm glad I don't need one: I just
happened to notice it while looking for something else.

Perce


Of course from the dump it costs nothing like that.


NT

Cursitor Doom
Guest

Sat Jan 19, 2019 1:45 am   



On Fri, 18 Jan 2019 16:53:35 -0500, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Quote:
Undoubtedly true, but not all parts do cost just a few pennies. E.g.,
today I saw that one little electronic module for our Maytag dryer sells
for $358 -- and I'm not sure we paid much more than $400 for the whole
appliance about three years ago. I'm glad I don't need one: I just
happened to notice it while looking for something else.


I'll wager the actual component(s) that failed within that module could
have been replaced for pennies, though. $358 is outrageous for probably
in total no more than 10 bucks worth of bits.





--
This message may be freely reproduced without limit or charge only via
the Usenet protocol. Reproduction in whole or part through other
protocols, whether for profit or not, is conditional upon a charge of
GBP10.00 per reproduction. Publication in this manner via non-Usenet
protocols constitutes acceptance of this condition.

John-Del
Guest

Sat Jan 19, 2019 4:45 am   



On Friday, January 18, 2019 at 7:34:32 PM UTC-5, Cursitor Doom wrote:
Quote:
On Fri, 18 Jan 2019 16:53:35 -0500, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Undoubtedly true, but not all parts do cost just a few pennies. E.g.,
today I saw that one little electronic module for our Maytag dryer sells
for $358 -- and I'm not sure we paid much more than $400 for the whole
appliance about three years ago. I'm glad I don't need one: I just
happened to notice it while looking for something else.

I'll wager the actual component(s) that failed within that module could
have been replaced for pennies, though. $358 is outrageous for probably
in total no more than 10 bucks worth of bits.



Believe it or not, a lot of those appliance modules have high ESR caps causing issues, and they are usually smaller value caps that don't present themselves with a vented top or bottom. But a lot of them have bad processors or support circuitry, and there's no schematic for the board or datasheets available for most ICs that are house numbered, so they can be problematic to fix.

But yeah, most of those boards are worth $150 tops.

Goto page 1, 2  Next

elektroda.net NewsGroups Forum Index - Repair Electronics - Dyson cyclone puzzle

Ask a question - edaboard.com

Arabic version Bulgarian version Catalan version Czech version Danish version German version Greek version English version Spanish version Finnish version French version Hindi version Croatian version Indonesian version Italian version Hebrew version Japanese version Korean version Lithuanian version Latvian version Dutch version Norwegian version Polish version Portuguese version Romanian version Russian version Slovak version Slovenian version Serbian version Swedish version Tagalog version Ukrainian version Vietnamese version Chinese version Turkish version
EDAboard.com map