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John Doe
Guest

Fri Jan 11, 2019 3:45 am   



On a typical DSO, can you specify some number of minutes or hours range
and then have it continuously plot the voltage of a battery being
charged?

I have looked around but haven't seen that.

Thanks.


Guest

Fri Jan 11, 2019 4:45 am   



On Thursday, January 10, 2019 at 9:11:35 PM UTC-5, John Doe wrote:
Quote:
On a typical DSO, can you specify some number of minutes or hours range
and then have it continuously plot the voltage of a battery being
charged?

I have looked around but haven't seen that.

Thanks.


Can't you just set the time base to suit? I guess it won't go out to hours.

I expect most DSOs can be remotely programmed. That might provide a wider range of sample rate.


Rick C.

- Get 6 months of free supercharging
- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Fri Jan 11, 2019 5:45 am   



On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 02:11:31 -0000 (UTC), John Doe
<always.look_at_message.header> wrote:

Quote:
On a typical DSO, can you specify some number of minutes or hours range
and then have it continuously plot the voltage of a battery being
charged?
I have looked around but haven't seen that.


No. The sampling rate can't be slowed down that much. Depending on
model, the amount of storage might not be sufficient for extended
periods.

Instead, I suggest a data logger and some chart recorder emulation
software. For example:
<https://www.dataq.com/data-acquisition/starter-kits/>
<https://www.dataq.com/products/windaq/
More data logger software:
<https://www.google.com/search?q=data+logger+software>

For battery discharge (not charge) testing, I use a West Mountain
Radio CBA II.
<http://www.westmountainradio.com/cba.php>
<http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/LiPo/Ultrafire%2018650%20test.jpg>
which produces results like this using the included software:
<http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/battery-tests/18650.jpg>

If you're into retro technology, maybe a strip chart recorder might be
better for long term tests:
<https://www.google.com/search?tbm=isch&q=strip+chart+recorder>
I still have a few of these buried somewhere which I used with a
Dranetz AC power line anomaly and event monitor.

If all else fails, you can use MS Excel to emulate a strip chart
recorder:
"Make a Strip-Chart Recorder in Excel"
<https://www.edn.com/electronics-news/4378330/Make-a-Strip-Chart-Recorder-in-Excel>
(Note that this article is 19 years old).

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

Mike
Guest

Fri Jan 11, 2019 8:45 am   



On 1/10/2019 6:11 PM, John Doe wrote:
Quote:
On a typical DSO, can you specify some number of minutes or hours range
and then have it continuously plot the voltage of a battery being
charged?

I have looked around but haven't seen that.

Thanks.

Short answer: Probably not
Longer question:
What are you trying to accomplish?
What's a typical DSO?
How precise must the measurement be?
Time interval required? "Hours" is a broad range.
Do you need to take any actions, like terminate charge?
What's the approximate voltage range you need to measure?
Is this a one-time thing, or do you need it often or are
you gonna go into production?
Do you need to save the data or just look and delete?

If it were me, I'd open the junk box and pull out the RadioShack
DMM with a serial port and tell the computer what to do with the
answers.

What I have done is connect a GPIB programmed power supply in current
mode and read the voltage output from it and told the computer what
to do with the info. Came in handy back in the day for -deltaV
fast charging of NiCd or NiMH laptop batteries.

Many single-chip processors have A/D inputs.

Or just hook up a smart charger and go do something fun.

delo
Guest

Fri Jan 11, 2019 9:45 am   



You can make it by yourself (if You have a tv set/monitor) search:
Simple AVR digital scope
its truly simple to build ( I have made one on perfboard...and it works)
one of the examples show exactly battery recharge,
or buy one of the stm32/color lcd small scopes( I'haven't yet one so dont kow the orizontal
timing range).

bye
delo

"John Doe" <always.look_at_message.header> ha scritto nel messaggio news:q18u0i$7fv$2_at_dont-email.me...
Quote:
On a typical DSO, can you specify some number of minutes or hours range
and then have it continuously plot the voltage of a battery being
charged?

I have looked around but haven't seen that.

Thanks.


John Larkin
Guest

Fri Jan 11, 2019 8:45 pm   



On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 02:11:31 -0000 (UTC), John Doe
<always.look_at_message.header> wrote:

Quote:
On a typical DSO, can you specify some number of minutes or hours range
and then have it continuously plot the voltage of a battery being
charged?

I have looked around but haven't seen that.

Thanks.


My Rigol will go 1000 seconds per cm, which is 2.7 hours per sweep,
and you could let several traces overlap without too much confusion.


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc
picosecond timing precision measurement

jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com
http://www.highlandtechnology.com

Dave Platt
Guest

Fri Jan 11, 2019 9:45 pm   



Quote:
On a typical DSO, can you specify some number of minutes or hours range
and then have it continuously plot the voltage of a battery being
charged?

I have looked around but haven't seen that.

Thanks.

Can't you just set the time base to suit? I guess it won't go out to hours.


Usually not, I think. For one example, the popular Rigol DS1xxx
family has sweeps that go as slow as 50 seconds/division, so you can
sweep for a few minutes, but not hours.

>I expect most DSOs can be remotely programmed. That might provide a wider range of sample rate.

This should be a very practical approach. The Rigol speaks SCPI (I
suspect this is a popular approach) via the USB interface. You should
be able to trigger a sweep every few seconds, or once a minute, or
etc. and then upload as much of the trace as you want (for
e.g. filtering/averaging purposes) and store the data and then plot it
with e.g. gnuplot.

I did something like this a few years ago to see if the Deltron
Battery Tender Jr. worked the way the manufacturer said that it did,
when recharging my big deep-cycle battery. In this case I used an old
HP DVM with a GPIB interface, which reads out twice a second... I
grabbed the data via a Prologix serial-to-GPIB adapter, averaged 30
seconds' worth of samples, and output the result, and then used
gnuplot to show the battery terminal voltage over time. The charger
worked just as advertised.


Guest

Sat Jan 12, 2019 12:45 am   



On Friday, 11 January 2019 19:10:52 UTC, John Larkin wrote:
Quote:
On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 02:11:31 -0000 (UTC), John Doe
always.look_at_message.header> wrote:

On a typical DSO, can you specify some number of minutes or hours range
and then have it continuously plot the voltage of a battery being
charged?

I have looked around but haven't seen that.

Thanks.

My Rigol will go 1000 seconds per cm, which is 2.7 hours per sweep,
and you could let several traces overlap without too much confusion.


Must have some impressive phosphor Smile
I was looking at some old CRT scopes today including a tiny Cossor not much bigger than the tube itself. I suspect a megahertz would have been too much to ask of that one.


NT

John Larkin
Guest

Sat Jan 12, 2019 1:45 am   



On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 15:03:05 -0800 (PST), tabbypurr_at_gmail.com wrote:

Quote:
On Friday, 11 January 2019 19:10:52 UTC, John Larkin wrote:
On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 02:11:31 -0000 (UTC), John Doe
always.look_at_message.header> wrote:

On a typical DSO, can you specify some number of minutes or hours range
and then have it continuously plot the voltage of a battery being
charged?

I have looked around but haven't seen that.

Thanks.

My Rigol will go 1000 seconds per cm, which is 2.7 hours per sweep,
and you could let several traces overlap without too much confusion.

Must have some impressive phosphor Smile


There was actually a CRT phosphor with infinite persistance.


Quote:
I was looking at some old CRT scopes today including a tiny Cossor not much bigger than the tube itself. I suspect a megahertz would have been too much to ask of that one.


https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c8/Hospitalier_Ondograph.png/270px-Hospitalier_Ondograph.png

http://www.myvintagetv.com/oscilloscopes/homebrew_side.jpg

Horrible stuff.



--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc
picosecond timing precision measurement

jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com
http://www.highlandtechnology.com


Guest

Sat Jan 12, 2019 2:45 pm   



On Saturday, 12 January 2019 00:08:09 UTC, John Larkin wrote:
Quote:
On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 15:03:05 -0800 (PST), tabbypurr wrote:
On Friday, 11 January 2019 19:10:52 UTC, John Larkin wrote:
On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 02:11:31 -0000 (UTC), John Doe
always.look_at_message.header> wrote:

On a typical DSO, can you specify some number of minutes or hours range
and then have it continuously plot the voltage of a battery being
charged?

I have looked around but haven't seen that.

Thanks.

My Rigol will go 1000 seconds per cm, which is 2.7 hours per sweep,
and you could let several traces overlap without too much confusion.

Must have some impressive phosphor :)

There was actually a CRT phosphor with infinite persistance.


It can't have produced light indefinitely, was it he one that left a darkened trace line?


Quote:
I was looking at some old CRT scopes today including a tiny Cossor not much bigger than the tube itself. I suspect a megahertz would have been too much to ask of that one.


https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c8/Hospitalier_Ondograph.png/270px-Hospitalier_Ondograph.png

http://www.myvintagetv.com/oscilloscopes/homebrew_side.jpg

Horrible stuff.


The Telequipment Serviscope managed all of 30kHz. But in fairness it was never meant to be a real scope.


NT

John Larkin
Guest

Sat Jan 12, 2019 4:45 pm   



On Sat, 12 Jan 2019 05:07:52 -0800 (PST), tabbypurr_at_gmail.com wrote:

Quote:
On Saturday, 12 January 2019 00:08:09 UTC, John Larkin wrote:
On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 15:03:05 -0800 (PST), tabbypurr wrote:
On Friday, 11 January 2019 19:10:52 UTC, John Larkin wrote:
On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 02:11:31 -0000 (UTC), John Doe
always.look_at_message.header> wrote:

On a typical DSO, can you specify some number of minutes or hours range
and then have it continuously plot the voltage of a battery being
charged?

I have looked around but haven't seen that.

Thanks.

My Rigol will go 1000 seconds per cm, which is 2.7 hours per sweep,
and you could let several traces overlap without too much confusion.

Must have some impressive phosphor :)

There was actually a CRT phosphor with infinite persistance.

It can't have produced light indefinitely, was it he one that left a darkened trace line?


Yes, P10 dark trace, erased with heat or UV.

Quote:


I was looking at some old CRT scopes today including a tiny Cossor not much bigger than the tube itself. I suspect a megahertz would have been too much to ask of that one.


https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c8/Hospitalier_Ondograph.png/270px-Hospitalier_Ondograph.png

http://www.myvintagetv.com/oscilloscopes/homebrew_side.jpg

Horrible stuff.

The Telequipment Serviscope managed all of 30kHz. But in fairness it was never meant to be a real scope.


NT


Today's digital color scopes are fabulous, and inflation-adjusted
about 50x cheaper than that old tube iron.

A Tek 547 with a decent plugin cost about as much as a Chevrolet.


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics


Guest

Sat Jan 12, 2019 6:45 pm   



On Saturday, January 12, 2019 at 10:44:39 AM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote:
Quote:
On Sat, 12 Jan 2019 05:07:52 -0800 (PST), tabbypurr_at_gmail.com wrote:

On Saturday, 12 January 2019 00:08:09 UTC, John Larkin wrote:
On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 15:03:05 -0800 (PST), tabbypurr wrote:
On Friday, 11 January 2019 19:10:52 UTC, John Larkin wrote:
On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 02:11:31 -0000 (UTC), John Doe
always.look_at_message.header> wrote:

On a typical DSO, can you specify some number of minutes or hours range
and then have it continuously plot the voltage of a battery being
charged?

I have looked around but haven't seen that.

Thanks.

My Rigol will go 1000 seconds per cm, which is 2.7 hours per sweep,
and you could let several traces overlap without too much confusion..

Must have some impressive phosphor :)

There was actually a CRT phosphor with infinite persistance.

It can't have produced light indefinitely, was it he one that left a darkened trace line?

Yes, P10 dark trace, erased with heat or UV.



I was looking at some old CRT scopes today including a tiny Cossor not much bigger than the tube itself. I suspect a megahertz would have been too much to ask of that one.


https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c8/Hospitalier_Ondograph.png/270px-Hospitalier_Ondograph.png

http://www.myvintagetv.com/oscilloscopes/homebrew_side.jpg

Horrible stuff.

The Telequipment Serviscope managed all of 30kHz. But in fairness it was never meant to be a real scope.


NT

Today's digital color scopes are fabulous, and inflation-adjusted
about 50x cheaper than that old tube iron.

A Tek 547 with a decent plugin cost about as much as a Chevrolet.


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics


Some of these people are completely out of touch with reality, which is fine until they reach the point of being unable to assimilate new knowledge.

This little gizmo, which is kinda cheap, has a selectable acquisition rate of 1Hz, streams data in roll mode, and could allow you to record data continuously like forever.

https://www.amazon.com/VT-DSO-2810R-8-16Bit-100MSPS-Oscilloscope/dp/B00VF7SZWC

More specs:
https://www.virtins.com/VT-DSO-2810R.shtml

Roll Mode
(Streaming Mode for Low Frequency Signals) Limited only by the computer memory available.
Roll Mode is allowed when fs ≤ 1MHz and [Record Length] ≥ 4 × [Roll Width]. Maximum sampling frequency for continuous streaming is computer speed and software setting dependent.

page 16 here:
https://www.virtins.com/VT-DSO-2810R-Manual.pdf


Guest

Sat Jan 12, 2019 7:45 pm   



On Saturday, 12 January 2019 15:44:39 UTC, John Larkin wrote:
Quote:
On Sat, 12 Jan 2019 05:07:52 -0800 (PST), tabbypurr wrote:
On Saturday, 12 January 2019 00:08:09 UTC, John Larkin wrote:
On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 15:03:05 -0800 (PST), tabbypurr wrote:
On Friday, 11 January 2019 19:10:52 UTC, John Larkin wrote:
On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 02:11:31 -0000 (UTC), John Doe
always.look_at_message.header> wrote:

My Rigol will go 1000 seconds per cm, which is 2.7 hours per sweep,
and you could let several traces overlap without too much confusion.

Must have some impressive phosphor :)

There was actually a CRT phosphor with infinite persistance.

It can't have produced light indefinitely, was it he one that left a darkened trace line?

Yes, P10 dark trace, erased with heat or UV.


I've never met one of those in the flesh. Or in the glass. Or maybe have but it was switched off.


Quote:
I was looking at some old CRT scopes today including a tiny Cossor not much bigger than the tube itself. I suspect a megahertz would have been too much to ask of that one.


https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c8/Hospitalier_Ondograph.png/270px-Hospitalier_Ondograph.png

http://www.myvintagetv.com/oscilloscopes/homebrew_side.jpg

Horrible stuff.

The Telequipment Serviscope managed all of 30kHz. But in fairness it was never meant to be a real scope.

Today's digital color scopes are fabulous, and inflation-adjusted
about 50x cheaper than that old tube iron.

A Tek 547 with a decent plugin cost about as much as a Chevrolet.


Progress marches on. My old Telequipment storage scope still has its place though.


NT

whit3rd
Guest

Sun Jan 13, 2019 2:45 am   



On Saturday, January 12, 2019 at 5:07:56 AM UTC-8, tabb...@gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
On Saturday, 12 January 2019 00:08:09 UTC, John Larkin wrote:

There was actually a CRT phosphor with infinite persistance.

It can't have produced light indefinitely, was it he one that left a darkened trace line?


The Tektronix 4000 series graphic terminals used a memory-tube architecture; each
lit pixel was (after activation by an electron beam) maintained by a secondary power
source. The display (about a megapixel) was its own memory buffer. The 4014 was
the best graphic output device of its day, at a (monochrome, one-bit) resolution comparable
to today's TVs.

The storage-tube CRTs were the parent of those graphics monsters of the 1970s.

Other CRT memory (machine-readable, not visual) was available, up to a few
megabytes per tube, before semiconductor memory filled that need.


Guest

Sun Jan 13, 2019 6:45 am   



On Sunday, 13 January 2019 01:17:03 UTC, whit3rd wrote:
Quote:
On Saturday, January 12, 2019 at 5:07:56 AM UTC-8, tabby wrote:
On Saturday, 12 January 2019 00:08:09 UTC, John Larkin wrote:

There was actually a CRT phosphor with infinite persistance.

It can't have produced light indefinitely, was it he one that left a darkened trace line?

The Tektronix 4000 series graphic terminals used a memory-tube architecture; each
lit pixel was (after activation by an electron beam) maintained by a secondary power
source. The display (about a megapixel) was its own memory buffer. The 4014 was
the best graphic output device of its day, at a (monochrome, one-bit) resolution comparable
to today's TVs.

The storage-tube CRTs were the parent of those graphics monsters of the 1970s.

Other CRT memory (machine-readable, not visual) was available, up to a few
megabytes per tube, before semiconductor memory filled that need.


CRT storage goes way back, used for RAM. A big improvement on mercury delay lines AIUI.


NT

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