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speff
Guest

Sun Oct 21, 2018 4:45 am   



On Sunday, 21 October 2018 03:22:51 UTC+8, Sjouke Burry wrote:
Quote:
On 20-10-2018 19:11, Tom Del Rosso wrote:
bitrex wrote:

There are similarly probably many Ivy league graduates in the US who
don't know how to ride an Amtrak train or ask a woman out on a date.

How do you ride an Amtrak train?



Carefully......


And painfully slowly, from what I hear.

bitrex
Guest

Sun Oct 21, 2018 5:45 am   



On 10/20/2018 01:11 PM, Tom Del Rosso wrote:
Quote:
bitrex wrote:

There are similarly probably many Ivy league graduates in the US who
don't know how to ride an Amtrak train or ask a woman out on a date.

How do you ride an Amtrak train?



The method I usually use is either buy a ticket online or at the station
counter, wait for the train to arrive at the train station at the
designated time, board the train, stow luggage in overhead bin, sit down
in seat, and hand ticket to conductor on the train when it's requested.

It's not uncommon for some Chinese students in the US (or some
American-born students for that matter) in their 20s to be unfamiliar
and anxious about this process, it's not also uncommon for them to never
have had a driver's license either. If you need to get somewhere your
parents book you a flight and you fly to where you need to go and then
your driver comes and picks you up at the airport.

bitrex
Guest

Sun Oct 21, 2018 5:45 am   



On 10/21/2018 12:23 AM, bitrex wrote:
Quote:
On 10/20/2018 01:11 PM, Tom Del Rosso wrote:
bitrex wrote:

There are similarly probably many Ivy league graduates in the US who
don't know how to ride an Amtrak train or ask a woman out on a date.

How do you ride an Amtrak train?



The method I usually use is either buy a ticket online or at the station
counter, wait for the train to arrive at the train station at the
designated time, board the train, stow luggage in overhead bin, sit down
in seat, and hand ticket to conductor on the train when it's requested.

It's not uncommon for some Chinese students in the US (or some
American-born students for that matter) in their 20s to be unfamiliar
and anxious about this process, it's not also


"also not uncommon", rather

bitrex
Guest

Sun Oct 21, 2018 5:45 am   



On 10/20/2018 10:59 PM, speff wrote:
Quote:
On Sunday, 21 October 2018 03:22:51 UTC+8, Sjouke Burry wrote:
On 20-10-2018 19:11, Tom Del Rosso wrote:
bitrex wrote:

There are similarly probably many Ivy league graduates in the US who
don't know how to ride an Amtrak train or ask a woman out on a date.

How do you ride an Amtrak train?



Carefully......

And painfully slowly, from what I hear.


If you're fortunate enough to live along the Boston -> NYC corridor you
can have an almost-TGV like experience. I commute between Boston and
Providence from time to time, the service hits max speed along that
stretch either 110 or 150 mph depending on whether it's the express or
regional, 50 miles in around 20 minutes for $15-30 depending on class
sure beats driving

Phil Hobbs
Guest

Mon Oct 22, 2018 1:45 am   



On 10/20/18 10:59 PM, speff wrote:
Quote:
On Sunday, 21 October 2018 03:22:51 UTC+8, Sjouke Burry wrote:
On 20-10-2018 19:11, Tom Del Rosso wrote:
bitrex wrote:

There are similarly probably many Ivy league graduates in the US who
don't know how to ride an Amtrak train or ask a woman out on a date.

How do you ride an Amtrak train?



Carefully......

And painfully slowly, from what I hear.


Within the Northeast Corridor (DC - Boston), Amtrak is my favourite way
to travel. You go from downtown to downtown with no hours of waiting
and no TSA. First Class on the Acela is nearly as nice as the old
Metroliner. (Now _that_ was a train--it ran for 50 years, with big
cushy leather seats, mains outlets, decent food, and a bar car with an
actual selection.)

Way faster than driving to the city airports, and much lower stress.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

http://electrooptical.net
http://hobbs-eo.com


Guest

Thu Jan 31, 2019 7:45 pm   



Thanks Andy, appreciate that full and clear explanation.

Terry, East Grinstead, UK


Guest

Thu Jan 31, 2019 7:45 pm   



The 4020 has no divide by 4 or 8 outputs. So they will be labelled either Q0, Q3, Q4 ... to Q13 (/16384), or Q1, Q4, Q5 ... to Q14, depending on your source.

Terry, East Grinstead, UK


Guest

Thu Jan 31, 2019 9:45 pm   



On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 3:59:55 AM UTC-5, Terry Pinnell wrote:
Quote:
Trouble-shooting (another) old kitchen timer I wasted some time until
realising there was some ambiguity about the pin layout of its CMOS
4020. Most sources show the first output as 'Q1' but others (including
the one on which I based my ancient notes) apparently call it Q0.

Is there a standard? Has it changed in the last 30 years or so?

Terry, East Grinstead, UK


Some of those datasheets, like the one from TI, are partial reprints of the old RCA datasheets which are pushing 50 years old or more, before there was any accepted convention. The modern designation for a 14-stage would be Q0-Q13. You can label them anything you like. Q1-Q14 is fine too.

Bill Beaty
Guest

Fri Feb 01, 2019 7:45 am   



On Monday, October 23, 2017 at 8:21:36 PM UTC-7, Robert Miller wrote:
Quote:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PmJg1Kmbgk4

What does it do? Either nothing unexpected ...or maybe it launches aether vortices rather than EM waves and thus PROVES MAXWELL WRONG MOO HOO HA HAAAAAAAA!


Quote:
Thanks Bill.

You do seem unusually well versed in things of a "crackpot" nature.


This "Caduceus coil" stuff may be real: UHF or GHz transmitters based
on spark gap exitation of a spiral antenna. They should act weird,
probably generating megawatt impulse, circular polarized centimeter-
waves in a narrow beam. Very weird when used in the early radio era.
But today they're just S-band satellite antennas.


Quote:
Have you ever seen _any_ that worked as claimed, or violated a known
physical law?


Nope.

Or maybe I did, and used it to become a hyper-billionaire,
regretted it, employed my time travel breakthrough to edit the
past, so in this manyworlds branch it never actually happened.

Heh, for years I was moderating an email forum for those testing
the crackpot devices. None ever did anything interesting,
except for plasma-based cold-fusion cells which tend to make
blinding flashes or even explode. Along the way we did invent
microwave oven ball-lightning and molten beer-bottles. Also
the "Quarter-shrinker," Lenz-law coin smasher based on energy-
storage 50KV capacitors got cheap from Boeing Surplus Sales.

Aaaaaand ...Boeing Surplus still exists, as an online auction:

https://investmentrecovery.boeing.com/


Guest

Mon Feb 11, 2019 7:45 pm   



On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 1:05:09 PM UTC-5, The Real Bev wrote:
Quote:
On 02/11/2019 09:44 AM, OGEE wrote:
Looking for less expensive 9v alkaline battery.


I was shocked to see the Kirkland leakage. I thought Costco chose better..

I have totally dropped Duracell and Kirkland for all my AA and AAA
needs. Duracell and Kirkland have Junk battery seals. I have years
of experience using these batteries hoping they would fix the seals, but
no they just keep destroying my devices.

Amazon sells many brands but there is unfortunately no durability
comparison this or other products.

You might want to skip Maxell too -- every single one I've used has
leaked, including when it was still in the package.

I also bought some of the Duracell 'Eneloop-like' batteries, which do
NOT hold a charge for almost a year like they're supposed to; maybe a
few weeks or months -- I use my camera infrequently now so I can't be
accurate.


I have Enloop cells and they seem to hold power a long time for me. I think I have put them in clocks and seen them hold up for a year. But that seems to be a waste since a regular battery also runs a year.

I just had a self setting clock damaged by a Kirkland battery. I don't see a warranty on the box, but I'm going to take the cell back along with the clock and see what they will do.

Has anyone tried the Sunbeam cells from the Dollar Tree? You can get four packs for $1 which puts them in the lowest prices category (I think Kirkland is maybe $0.22) I believe you get a pair of alkaline 9v batteries for $1.. I've used them, but not extensively. They have been tested online and found to last as long as the Duracells. Some recent reviews seem to find some better values than Duracell/Kirkland in terms of longevity, but I don't recall the winners. Maybe it was Consumer Reports.

Rick C.

gray_wolf
Guest

Mon Feb 11, 2019 10:45 pm   



On 2/11/2019 12:34 PM, gnuarm.deletethisbit_at_gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 1:05:09 PM UTC-5, The Real Bev wrote:
On 02/11/2019 09:44 AM, OGEE wrote:
Looking for less expensive 9v alkaline battery.


I was shocked to see the Kirkland leakage. I thought Costco chose better.

I have totally dropped Duracell and Kirkland for all my AA and AAA
needs. Duracell and Kirkland have Junk battery seals. I have years
of experience using these batteries hoping they would fix the seals, but
no they just keep destroying my devices.

Amazon sells many brands but there is unfortunately no durability
comparison this or other products.

You might want to skip Maxell too -- every single one I've used has
leaked, including when it was still in the package.

I also bought some of the Duracell 'Eneloop-like' batteries, which do
NOT hold a charge for almost a year like they're supposed to; maybe a
few weeks or months -- I use my camera infrequently now so I can't be
accurate.

I have Enloop cells and they seem to hold power a long time for me. I think I have put them in clocks and seen them hold up for a year. But that seems to be a waste since a regular battery also runs a year.

I just had a self setting clock damaged by a Kirkland battery. I don't see a warranty on the box, but I'm going to take the cell back along with the clock and see what they will do.

Has anyone tried the Sunbeam cells from the Dollar Tree? You can get four packs for $1 which puts them in the lowest prices category (I think Kirkland is maybe $0.22) I believe you get a pair of alkaline 9v batteries for $1. I've used them, but not extensively. They have been tested online and found to last as long as the Duracells. Some recent reviews seem to find some better values than Duracell/Kirkland in terms of longevity, but I don't recall the winners. Maybe it was Consumer Reports.

Rick C.


There is a youtube video on battery reviews.

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Tue Feb 12, 2019 4:45 am   



On Mon, 11 Feb 2019 18:58:58 -0800, Jeff Liebermann <jeffl_at_cruzio.com>
wrote:

Quote:
Nope. I've asked and checked the web pile. No alkaline 9V batteries.
What they do have is a "heavy duty" 9V battery, which means carbon
zinc. No thanks.
https://www.dollartree.com/bulk/9-Volt-Battery


Worse. While the local store still has Sunbeam 4 AAA cells for $1,
the web pile is now offering only 3 AAA cells per package.
<https://www.dollartree.com/search/go?w=&w=alkaline+battery>
Probably time to stock up on some 4 AAA per packages.

Also, the offering of 2 AAA and 2 AA cells per package with "34% more
power" makes me wonder if the 4 AAA per cell devices are in some way
inferior. When I find the time, maybe some discharge testing will
help.

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

Jeff Liebermann
Guest

Tue Feb 12, 2019 4:45 am   



On Mon, 11 Feb 2019 10:34:20 -0800 (PST),
gnuarm.deletethisbit_at_gmail.com wrote:

>Has anyone tried the Sunbeam cells from the Dollar Tree?

Yep. The alkaline AA and AAA work fairly well. I haven't run them
through a discharge test or had them long enough to determine if they
leak. Mostly, I bought them to give to friends and neighbors who want
to "borrow" batteries. Most of my collection is now either NiMH LSD
(low self discharge) cells, or LiIon.

Quote:
You can get four packs for $1 which puts them in the lowest prices
category (I think Kirkland is maybe $0.22) I believe you get a
pair of alkaline 9v batteries for $1.


Nope. I've asked and checked the web pile. No alkaline 9V batteries.
What they do have is a "heavy duty" 9V battery, which means carbon
zinc. No thanks.
<https://www.dollartree.com/bulk/9-Volt-Battery>


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl_at_cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558


Guest

Tue Feb 12, 2019 4:45 am   



On Mon, 11 Feb 2019 18:58:58 -0800, Jeff Liebermann <jeffl_at_cruzio.com>
wrote:

Quote:
On Mon, 11 Feb 2019 10:34:20 -0800 (PST),
gnuarm.deletethisbit_at_gmail.com wrote:

Has anyone tried the Sunbeam cells from the Dollar Tree?

Yep. The alkaline AA and AAA work fairly well. I haven't run them
through a discharge test or had them long enough to determine if they
leak. Mostly, I bought them to give to friends and neighbors who want
to "borrow" batteries. Most of my collection is now either NiMH LSD
(low self discharge) cells, or LiIon.


If you leave batteries in the appliance and care about it, invest in
LiFeS2 cells, generally used for cameras and flash units. Energizer
sells AA and AAA sized "L92s" (E92s are the common alkalines). I
don't believe they make 9V batteries in the LiFeS2 chemistry, though.
They're about a buck a piece from Amazon but they're worth it. They
have a shelf life of something like 20 years and will take heat better
than alkalines. Great for emergency flashlights.

Quote:
You can get four packs for $1 which puts them in the lowest prices
category (I think Kirkland is maybe $0.22) I believe you get a
pair of alkaline 9v batteries for $1.

Nope. I've asked and checked the web pile. No alkaline 9V batteries.
What they do have is a "heavy duty" 9V battery, which means carbon
zinc. No thanks.
https://www.dollartree.com/bulk/9-Volt-Battery


Mike
Guest

Tue Feb 12, 2019 7:45 am   



On 2/11/2019 7:06 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
Quote:
On Mon, 11 Feb 2019 18:58:58 -0800, Jeff Liebermann <jeffl_at_cruzio.com
wrote:

Nope. I've asked and checked the web pile. No alkaline 9V batteries.
What they do have is a "heavy duty" 9V battery, which means carbon
zinc. No thanks.
https://www.dollartree.com/bulk/9-Volt-Battery

Worse. While the local store still has Sunbeam 4 AAA cells for $1,
the web pile is now offering only 3 AAA cells per package.
https://www.dollartree.com/search/go?w=&w=alkaline+battery
Probably time to stock up on some 4 AAA per packages.

Also, the offering of 2 AAA and 2 AA cells per package with "34% more
power" makes me wonder if the 4 AAA per cell devices are in some way
inferior. When I find the time, maybe some discharge testing will
help.

Their coin cells, CR2032 etc., have recently switched from 2/1$ to 1$ each.


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