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Commander Kinsey
Guest

Sun Feb 23, 2020 8:45 pm   



On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 18:54:20 -0000, ABLE1 <somewhere_at_nowhere.net> wrote:

Quote:
On 2/21/2020 3:56 PM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I
tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry
finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?


Hello,

With all the long conversation on the issue, and not.

Nobody has mentioned the use of a Megohmmeter or Megger to test
the quality or effectiveness of an insulating substance.

A Megohmmeter is designed for and used for that purpose.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megohmmeter

So connect your parrot to a Megger and crank it up.
The parrot may talk or not afterwards.

You all may now resume the previous activities:


Destructive testing is not useful testing. Are you one of those people that goes round companies doing "safety tests" on equipment and blowing up the electronics inside with high voltages?

default
Guest

Sun Feb 23, 2020 9:45 pm   



On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 18:30:55 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
<CFKinsey_at_military.org.jp> wrote:

Quote:
On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 13:15:28 -0000, default <default_at_defaulter.net> wrote:

On Sat, 22 Feb 2020 20:39:19 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey_at_military.org.jp> wrote:

On Sat, 22 Feb 2020 05:50:10 -0000, Jasen Betts <jasen_at_xnet.co.nz> wrote:

On 2020-02-21, Commander Kinsey <CFKinsey_at_military.org.jp> wrote:
My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I
tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry
finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?

for useful measurements at such high resistances you really need to use
an insulation tester. expect some discomfort.

It's over 20MOhms, that's good enough for me.

I don't think you can count on that. The 9V battery in a multi tester
may not be enough to form the current paths in the material being
tested.

Ah, that's why they use those criminally damaging testers for electrical safety tests. The ones that can actually destroy computer equipment.


Something similar seems to go on with measuring very low ohms too. A
substantial current may be necessary to accurately measure the
resistance. One place I worked had an ancient mirrored galvanometer
in an apparatus that dated to the last century - but it was the gold
standard when it came to accuracy at low ohms. Four leads to test too
- two for current and two for voltage drop across the R under test.
Quote:

A high enough potential, and wood, drywall, carpeting, some plastics,
etc., may be good conductors. (things you learn playing with Tesla
coils)

Not sure how I can perform this test then. I don't want 240V anywhere near her foot for testing.


Just keep the bird away from the voltage? A little hot sauce on the
wire insulation?
Quote:

And you shouldn't discount mitigating circumstances if safety is
involved. I was working on my boat, hands covered with salt-water and
figured I'd have no problem with 12V, yet touching the battery leads
reminded me of every little cut, abrasion, torn cuticle, etc., on my
hands. Not lethal maybe, but disagreeable.

I doubt it was even possible to harm you, even a 9V battery on your tongue just stings. Mind you if you're up a ladder anything that gives you a fright can make you fall off. I was painting my neighbour's eaves once and his stupid wife tried to have a bloody conversation with me from below. It was the only time I've used rather strong swearwords at her. Her husband found it amusing.


The salt water and battery thing wasn't dangerous since there needs to
be sufficient current through a vital organ. (the Navy said 100
milliamps - but not how they arrived at that figure) It was
disagreeable enough to make it hard to work on the system.
Quote:

I'm using one of those so-called space blankets (aluminized polyester
film) to shield the light emanating from a indoor hydroponic planter.
With all the timers, pumps, lights, and fans, it seemed like a good
idea to check the conductivity. One side is an insulator the other
reads zero ohms everywhere I checked, even 5 feet apart. The stuff
isn't totally light proof it just attenuates the light ~80%, so I know
the aluminum coating can't be very thick.

One day that will fall down and short something and cause a fire, I'd be careful if I were you.


The potential is there. The lights use a current limiter, but the
open circuit voltage is 80 VDC. Current limiting (300 ma) and the
voltage is 30 volts or so. The pumps are 120 V submersible types and
the prime danger IMO. There is a GFI and 5 amp circuit breaker built
in too.

It weighs 50 pounds or so with a large footprint and low center of
gravity,

Commander Kinsey
Guest

Sun Feb 23, 2020 9:45 pm   



On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 19:57:08 -0000, default <default_at_defaulter.net> wrote:

Quote:
On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 18:30:55 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey_at_military.org.jp> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 13:15:28 -0000, default <default_at_defaulter.net> wrote:

On Sat, 22 Feb 2020 20:39:19 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey_at_military.org.jp> wrote:

On Sat, 22 Feb 2020 05:50:10 -0000, Jasen Betts <jasen_at_xnet.co.nz> wrote:

On 2020-02-21, Commander Kinsey <CFKinsey_at_military.org.jp> wrote:
My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I
tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry
finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?

for useful measurements at such high resistances you really need to use
an insulation tester. expect some discomfort.

It's over 20MOhms, that's good enough for me.

I don't think you can count on that. The 9V battery in a multi tester
may not be enough to form the current paths in the material being
tested.

Ah, that's why they use those criminally damaging testers for electrical safety tests. The ones that can actually destroy computer equipment.

Something similar seems to go on with measuring very low ohms too. A
substantial current may be necessary to accurately measure the
resistance.


Is that due to the lack of having a sensitive enough voltmeter to measure the drop? Or do conductors actually change resistance with current? I thought that only happened at really high temperature, like with lightbulb filaments.

Quote:
One place I worked had an ancient mirrored galvanometer
in an apparatus that dated to the last century - but it was the gold
standard when it came to accuracy at low ohms. Four leads to test too
- two for current and two for voltage drop across the R under test.

A high enough potential, and wood, drywall, carpeting, some plastics,
etc., may be good conductors. (things you learn playing with Tesla
coils)

Not sure how I can perform this test then. I don't want 240V anywhere near her foot for testing.

Just keep the bird away from the voltage? A little hot sauce on the
wire insulation?


Never thought of adding something disgusting. Mind you, I'd have to pick something that wouldn't poison her. Probably easier to put something physically in the way of the wires.

Quote:
And you shouldn't discount mitigating circumstances if safety is
involved. I was working on my boat, hands covered with salt-water and
figured I'd have no problem with 12V, yet touching the battery leads
reminded me of every little cut, abrasion, torn cuticle, etc., on my
hands. Not lethal maybe, but disagreeable.

I doubt it was even possible to harm you, even a 9V battery on your tongue just stings. Mind you if you're up a ladder anything that gives you a fright can make you fall off. I was painting my neighbour's eaves once and his stupid wife tried to have a bloody conversation with me from below. It was the only time I've used rather strong swearwords at her. Her husband found it amusing.

The salt water and battery thing wasn't dangerous since there needs to
be sufficient current through a vital organ. (the Navy said 100
milliamps - but not how they arrived at that figure) It was
disagreeable enough to make it hard to work on the system.


I heard something I believe is a myth, that someone in the army gave himself a heart attack from a multimeter on resistance mode by holding each end with a cut finger. No way there's many milliamps from those things. I think the accepted amount for death is somewhere around what you said the Navy said (hence breakers trip at 30 or 50mA).

Quote:
I'm using one of those so-called space blankets (aluminized polyester
film) to shield the light emanating from a indoor hydroponic planter.
With all the timers, pumps, lights, and fans, it seemed like a good
idea to check the conductivity. One side is an insulator the other
reads zero ohms everywhere I checked, even 5 feet apart. The stuff
isn't totally light proof it just attenuates the light ~80%, so I know
the aluminum coating can't be very thick.

One day that will fall down and short something and cause a fire, I'd be careful if I were you.

The potential is there. The lights use a current limiter, but the
open circuit voltage is 80 VDC. Current limiting (300 ma) and the
voltage is 30 volts or so. The pumps are 120 V submersible types and
the prime danger IMO. There is a GFI and 5 amp circuit breaker built
in too.


You probably don't need much current to set fire to that blanket. Is it flammable?

Quote:
It weighs 50 pounds or so with a large footprint and low center of
gravity,


My house still has fuses. I detest nuisance trips.

Commander Kinsey
Guest

Sun Feb 23, 2020 9:45 pm   



On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 19:57:08 -0000, default <default_at_defaulter.net> wrote:

Quote:
I'm using one of those so-called space blankets (aluminized polyester
film) to shield the light emanating from a indoor hydroponic planter.


You mean marijuana farm Smile

Jasen Betts
Guest

Mon Feb 24, 2020 8:45 am   



On 2020-02-23, ABLE1 <somewhere_at_nowhere.net> wrote:
Quote:
On 2/21/2020 3:56 PM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I
tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry
finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?


Hello,

With all the long conversation on the issue, and not.

Nobody has mentioned the use of a Megohmmeter or Megger to test
the quality or effectiveness of an insulating substance.


I did a few days back, I called it by its other name "insulation tester"
and got a response from Phil A.

--
Jasen.

Phil Allison
Guest

Mon Feb 24, 2020 10:45 am   



Jasen Betts wrote:

------------------
Quote:


Hello,

With all the long conversation on the issue, and not.

Nobody has mentioned the use of a Megohmmeter or Megger to test
the quality or effectiveness of an insulating substance.


** "Megger " is an brand name.

Refers to a high voltage ( 500 or 1000VDC ) ohm meter - with a dial calibrated in megohms. Human skin would likely show as a dead short.


Quote:
I did a few days back, I called it by its other name "insulation tester"
and got a response from Phil A.


** A rather funny one.


.... Phil

default
Guest

Mon Feb 24, 2020 2:45 pm   



On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 20:09:15 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
<CFKinsey_at_military.org.jp> wrote:

Quote:
On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 19:57:08 -0000, default <default_at_defaulter.net> wrote:

I'm using one of those so-called space blankets (aluminized polyester
film) to shield the light emanating from a indoor hydroponic planter.

You mean marijuana farm Smile


Actually no. My marijuana days are over. Too many side effects like
gallons of mint chocolate chip ice cream...

I bought my wife one of the Aerogarden planters for Xmas a year ago,
and was so impressed with how well it worked that I had to have one,
so I built it.

I got her the "harvest" version and paid $129 at the time.
https://www.aerogarden.com/

I already had a light frame for growing seedlings, and got tired of
bending to tend the plants so built a table for it. After seeing how
well her Aerogarden was working it was a small matter to add some tote
boxes with lids for nutrients plants and small submersible pumps for
spraying the roots. I can grow plants ~2 feet high, and have space
for 14 plants. The thing really works well. I have cilantro, basil,
and Swiss chard - growing fast in the dead of winter, with next to no
effort.

The controls were all off-the shelf timers, switches and power
supplies. I added temperature switches and a few tiny 5 V fans to
cool the lights and a level sensor that tells me the water level needs
to be topped off. Everything else is just a little woodworking.

I suspect they'd be a good investment. They have a good range of
products, Scott (lawn care, Miracal Gro) has a large stake in their
stock already, and their larger "farm" size planters are turn-key
marijuana factories. With the legalization of pot they are poised to
really take off. In my opinion... Also, while the design is easily
copied and will be, they have a good head start and the prices of
their products keep dropping so I know they are going for volume and
will set the standard for the competition to match or beat.

The wife has cherry tomatoes growing in her planter now and is already
harvesting them. I did try a tomato plant in mine but the variety was
not small and it was taking over the entire planter so I stuck it
outside where it promptly froze and died.

ABLE1
Guest

Mon Feb 24, 2020 2:45 pm   



On 2/24/2020 2:02 AM, Jasen Betts wrote:
Quote:
On 2020-02-23, ABLE1 <somewhere_at_nowhere.net> wrote:
On 2/21/2020 3:56 PM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I
tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry
finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?


Hello,

With all the long conversation on the issue, and not.

Nobody has mentioned the use of a Megohmmeter or Megger to test
the quality or effectiveness of an insulating substance.

I did a few days back, I called it by its other name "insulation tester"
and got a response from Phil A.


Sorry, I must have missed that one.
I use to use a Megger to test the insulation on large DC motors.
NEVER considered touching anything to see the intensity of
the output.

Did think it would do similar that of a Bell Telephone generator
to get night crawlers out of the ground. My dad had one and it
worked quite well. I suspect the Megger would do the same.

As for the Parrot for this thread, it is a innocent bystander.
And as such, should not be used in a lab experiment.

default
Guest

Mon Feb 24, 2020 2:45 pm   



On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 20:08:45 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
<CFKinsey_at_military.org.jp> wrote:

Quote:
On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 19:57:08 -0000, default <default_at_defaulter.net> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 18:30:55 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey_at_military.org.jp> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 13:15:28 -0000, default <default_at_defaulter.net> wrote:

On Sat, 22 Feb 2020 20:39:19 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey_at_military.org.jp> wrote:

On Sat, 22 Feb 2020 05:50:10 -0000, Jasen Betts <jasen_at_xnet.co.nz> wrote:

On 2020-02-21, Commander Kinsey <CFKinsey_at_military.org.jp> wrote:
My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I
tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry
finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?

for useful measurements at such high resistances you really need to use
an insulation tester. expect some discomfort.

It's over 20MOhms, that's good enough for me.

I don't think you can count on that. The 9V battery in a multi tester
may not be enough to form the current paths in the material being
tested.

Ah, that's why they use those criminally damaging testers for electrical safety tests. The ones that can actually destroy computer equipment.

Something similar seems to go on with measuring very low ohms too. A
substantial current may be necessary to accurately measure the
resistance.

Is that due to the lack of having a sensitive enough voltmeter to measure the drop? Or do conductors actually change resistance with current? I thought that only happened at really high temperature, like with lightbulb filaments.


The temperature coefficient never came into it - the object was to
read the resistance at room temperature. We were making current
sensing resistors for a power supply we made. The mirrored
galvanometer was an old adaptation to get a very sensitive meter
without tubes or transistors. The whole instrument was in an oak box
with brass fittings and brass plugs to set the range.
Quote:

One place I worked had an ancient mirrored galvanometer
in an apparatus that dated to the last century - but it was the gold
standard when it came to accuracy at low ohms. Four leads to test too
- two for current and two for voltage drop across the R under test.

A high enough potential, and wood, drywall, carpeting, some plastics,
etc., may be good conductors. (things you learn playing with Tesla
coils)

Not sure how I can perform this test then. I don't want 240V anywhere near her foot for testing.

Just keep the bird away from the voltage? A little hot sauce on the
wire insulation?

Never thought of adding something disgusting. Mind you, I'd have to pick something that wouldn't poison her. Probably easier to put something physically in the way of the wires.

And you shouldn't discount mitigating circumstances if safety is
involved. I was working on my boat, hands covered with salt-water and
figured I'd have no problem with 12V, yet touching the battery leads
reminded me of every little cut, abrasion, torn cuticle, etc., on my
hands. Not lethal maybe, but disagreeable.

I doubt it was even possible to harm you, even a 9V battery on your tongue just stings. Mind you if you're up a ladder anything that gives you a fright can make you fall off. I was painting my neighbour's eaves once and his stupid wife tried to have a bloody conversation with me from below. It was the only time I've used rather strong swearwords at her. Her husband found it amusing.

The salt water and battery thing wasn't dangerous since there needs to
be sufficient current through a vital organ. (the Navy said 100
milliamps - but not how they arrived at that figure) It was
disagreeable enough to make it hard to work on the system.

I heard something I believe is a myth, that someone in the army gave himself a heart attack from a multimeter on resistance mode by holding each end with a cut finger. No way there's many milliamps from those things. I think the accepted amount for death is somewhere around what you said the Navy said (hence breakers trip at 30 or 50mA).


Those old hand-cranked "meggers" (insulation testers) were reputed to
give an impressive shock. I never used one that was the bailiwick of
the antenna people. At a transmitter site I saw one guy have a spark
jump from his ass to the scope cart behind him when the safety
discharge contactors and his shorting stick failed. Old WW2 large HF
transmitter. He wasn't killed but did go into shock after laughing
about it, we had to get him off the mountain and to a hospital.

Quote:
I'm using one of those so-called space blankets (aluminized polyester
film) to shield the light emanating from a indoor hydroponic planter.
With all the timers, pumps, lights, and fans, it seemed like a good
idea to check the conductivity. One side is an insulator the other
reads zero ohms everywhere I checked, even 5 feet apart. The stuff
isn't totally light proof it just attenuates the light ~80%, so I know
the aluminum coating can't be very thick.

One day that will fall down and short something and cause a fire, I'd be careful if I were you.

The potential is there. The lights use a current limiter, but the
open circuit voltage is 80 VDC. Current limiting (300 ma) and the
voltage is 30 volts or so. The pumps are 120 V submersible types and
the prime danger IMO. There is a GFI and 5 amp circuit breaker built
in too.

You probably don't need much current to set fire to that blanket. Is it flammable?


It is plastic so I expect it is flammable, but from my experience with
Mylar, it takes a high temperature without melting.

I just tried it. It wouldn't light readily with a match but the torch
did the job and it sustained a flame once lit.
Quote:

It weighs 50 pounds or so with a large footprint and low center of
gravity,

My house still has fuses. I detest nuisance trips.


My wife's house had plug fuses, fabric covered wiring, and no grounds.
The copper was all black with either oxidation or some coating, and
the enclosed lights had insulation that was falling apart.

She paid an electrician some $3,000 to bring it to code. I thought
that was a good deal considering the amount of work involved. The
electric range needed 4 wires, and the wall outlets went from 14 AWG
to 12 AWG and 20 amp breakers. I think the only thing that guy didn't
change were the light switches and light fixtures.

I've done some wiring in her house, but I didn't want to tackle that
job.

Archer
Guest

Mon Feb 24, 2020 3:45 pm   



On Fri, 21 Feb 2020 20:56:42 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
<CFKinsey_at_military.org.jp> wrote:

Quote:
My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?


https://youtu.be/sWg2xScJ6JM

See the above video showing someone in India who is not affected by
240 v passing through his body
--
Archer

Michael Terrell
Guest

Mon Feb 24, 2020 5:45 pm   



On Monday, February 24, 2020 at 8:06:48 AM UTC-5, ABLE1 wrote:
Quote:

Sorry, I must have missed that one.
I use to use a Megger to test the insulation on large DC motors.
NEVER considered touching anything to see the intensity of
the output.

Did think it would do similar that of a Bell Telephone generator
to get night crawlers out of the ground. My dad had one and it
worked quite well. I suspect the Megger would do the same.

As for the Parrot for this thread, it is a innocent bystander.
And as such, should not be used in a lab experiment.


The thread can't end without hearing from Monty Python!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZw35VUBdzo

Commander Kinsey
Guest

Mon Feb 24, 2020 8:45 pm   



On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 09:39:04 -0000, Phil Allison <pallison49_at_gmail.com> wrote:

Quote:
Jasen Betts wrote:

------------------


Hello,

With all the long conversation on the issue, and not.

Nobody has mentioned the use of a Megohmmeter or Megger to test
the quality or effectiveness of an insulating substance.


** "Megger " is an brand name.

Refers to a high voltage ( 500 or 1000VDC ) ohm meter - with a dial calibrated in megohms. Human skin would likely show as a dead short.


Considering how much that hurts, how much damage do you think you're doing to the equipment you test with it?

Commander Kinsey
Guest

Mon Feb 24, 2020 8:45 pm   



On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 13:06:40 -0000, ABLE1 <somewhere_at_nowhere.net> wrote:

Quote:
On 2/24/2020 2:02 AM, Jasen Betts wrote:
On 2020-02-23, ABLE1 <somewhere_at_nowhere.net> wrote:
On 2/21/2020 3:56 PM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
My pet parrot has a habit of chewing wires but never got a shock. I
tested her feet with a multimeter and it was over 20Mohms. My own dry
finger is 1Mohm. Are they safe from shocks due to scaly feet?


Hello,

With all the long conversation on the issue, and not.

Nobody has mentioned the use of a Megohmmeter or Megger to test
the quality or effectiveness of an insulating substance.

I did a few days back, I called it by its other name "insulation tester"
and got a response from Phil A.

Sorry, I must have missed that one.
I use to use a Megger to test the insulation on large DC motors.
NEVER considered touching anything to see the intensity of
the output.


Similar to a TENS machine on full power when the victim isn't expecting it.

Quote:
Did think it would do similar that of a Bell Telephone generator
to get night crawlers out of the ground. My dad had one and it
worked quite well. I suspect the Megger would do the same.

As for the Parrot for this thread, it is a innocent bystander.
And as such, should not be used in a lab experiment.


It's also incapable of learning not to touch the wires!

Commander Kinsey
Guest

Mon Feb 24, 2020 8:45 pm   



On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 15:52:40 -0000, Michael Terrell <terrell.michael.a_at_gmail.com> wrote:

Quote:
On Monday, February 24, 2020 at 8:06:48 AM UTC-5, ABLE1 wrote:

Sorry, I must have missed that one.
I use to use a Megger to test the insulation on large DC motors.
NEVER considered touching anything to see the intensity of
the output.

Did think it would do similar that of a Bell Telephone generator
to get night crawlers out of the ground. My dad had one and it
worked quite well. I suspect the Megger would do the same.

As for the Parrot for this thread, it is a innocent bystander.
And as such, should not be used in a lab experiment.

The thread can't end without hearing from Monty Python!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZw35VUBdzo


If that's the sketch I think it is, I refuse to watch it, it's sick. Everything else from Monty Python is hilarious, but not that.

Commander Kinsey
Guest

Mon Feb 24, 2020 8:45 pm   



On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 12:45:55 -0000, default <default_at_defaulter.net> wrote:

Quote:
On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 20:08:45 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey_at_military.org.jp> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 19:57:08 -0000, default <default_at_defaulter.net> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 18:30:55 -0000, "Commander Kinsey"
CFKinsey_at_military.org.jp> wrote:

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 13:15:28 -0000, default <default_at_defaulter.net> wrote:

And you shouldn't discount mitigating circumstances if safety is
involved. I was working on my boat, hands covered with salt-water and
figured I'd have no problem with 12V, yet touching the battery leads
reminded me of every little cut, abrasion, torn cuticle, etc., on my
hands. Not lethal maybe, but disagreeable.

I doubt it was even possible to harm you, even a 9V battery on your tongue just stings. Mind you if you're up a ladder anything that gives you a fright can make you fall off. I was painting my neighbour's eaves once and his stupid wife tried to have a bloody conversation with me from below. It was the only time I've used rather strong swearwords at her. Her husband found it amusing.

The salt water and battery thing wasn't dangerous since there needs to
be sufficient current through a vital organ. (the Navy said 100
milliamps - but not how they arrived at that figure) It was
disagreeable enough to make it hard to work on the system.

I heard something I believe is a myth, that someone in the army gave himself a heart attack from a multimeter on resistance mode by holding each end with a cut finger. No way there's many milliamps from those things. I think the accepted amount for death is somewhere around what you said the Navy said (hence breakers trip at 30 or 50mA).

Those old hand-cranked "meggers" (insulation testers) were reputed to
give an impressive shock. I never used one that was the bailiwick of
the antenna people. At a transmitter site I saw one guy have a spark
jump from his ass to the scope cart behind him when the safety
discharge contactors and his shorting stick failed. Old WW2 large HF
transmitter. He wasn't killed but did go into shock after laughing
about it, we had to get him off the mountain and to a hospital.


What a pussy. Awww were his buttocks sore? Hospital indeed....

Quote:
I'm using one of those so-called space blankets (aluminized polyester
film) to shield the light emanating from a indoor hydroponic planter.
With all the timers, pumps, lights, and fans, it seemed like a good
idea to check the conductivity. One side is an insulator the other
reads zero ohms everywhere I checked, even 5 feet apart. The stuff
isn't totally light proof it just attenuates the light ~80%, so I know
the aluminum coating can't be very thick.

One day that will fall down and short something and cause a fire, I'd be careful if I were you.

The potential is there. The lights use a current limiter, but the
open circuit voltage is 80 VDC. Current limiting (300 ma) and the
voltage is 30 volts or so. The pumps are 120 V submersible types and
the prime danger IMO. There is a GFI and 5 amp circuit breaker built
in too.

You probably don't need much current to set fire to that blanket. Is it flammable?

It is plastic so I expect it is flammable, but from my experience with
Mylar, it takes a high temperature without melting.

I just tried it. It wouldn't light readily with a match but the torch
did the job and it sustained a flame once lit.


If you have one to spare, you could have some fun passing current through it when in your garden, then you'd know if it's a fire hazard.

Quote:
It weighs 50 pounds or so with a large footprint and low center of
gravity,

My house still has fuses. I detest nuisance trips.

My wife's house had plug fuses,


You say "plug fuses" like that's a bad thing. All UK plugs have fuses.

> fabric covered wiring, and no grounds.

Grounds can be dangerous. Consider you touch something that you didn't know was live. Now you need to touch a ground aswell to get a shock. And if that ground is your knee against an appliance while the live is on your finger, your heart is in the middle.

Quote:
The copper was all black with either oxidation or some coating, and
the enclosed lights had insulation that was falling apart.

She paid an electrician some $3,000 to bring it to code.


Why are Americans obsessed with this "code" thing? In the UK we do whatever we like with our own homes.

Quote:
I thought
that was a good deal considering the amount of work involved. The
electric range needed 4 wires, and the wall outlets went from 14 AWG
to 12 AWG and 20 amp breakers. I think the only thing that guy didn't
change were the light switches and light fixtures.

I've done some wiring in her house, but I didn't want to tackle that
job.


I'm sure you could have done it for a lot less than $3000 unless it was a 10 bedroom mansion.

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