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bitrex
Guest

Sun Feb 10, 2019 6:45 am   



On 02/10/2019 12:25 AM, bitrex wrote:
Quote:
On 02/09/2019 01:28 PM, Phil Hobbs wrote:
So.

I have this effectively-infinitely-fast temperature control gizmo that
I've been dying to make a good demo for. The gizmo produces a volume
which is essentially immune to external thermal forcing, and that's
what I want to demonstrate.  The idea would be to show what
temperature does to some unprotected thing, then turn on the
controller which will make it completely immune.

I'm thinking of building a sort of thermal Theremin with a crystal
oscillator beating with an LC.  That ought to give a nice audible
woo-woo sound when I heat it with a hair dryer or a small heat gun.
I might try dividing the XO down to 10 kHz or so and using a
sample-hold to do the downconversion, so that the signal would never
leave the audio range.

That will sound interesting, but might not be the most compelling demo.

Any alternatives?

(Sorry for the teaser--I'll happily say more about it when the patent
has been filed.)

Cheers

Phil Hobbs


Yeah needs to be more dramatic.

Put some kind of thermally-activated triggering device in the volume
that fires a huge volume of pink glitter and fart-scent spray around the
conference room if it hits a certain temperature and put the whole
apparatus on a hot plate with a dramatic RED 7-segment display like the
show "24" showing the temperature rising to the critical temperature.

The attendees have to agree to sign off on a purchase order if their
activating your device saves the day/their suits. Tell them it's a
really nasty-smelling fart-spray, too, the worst there is. Lock the doors.



There are likely ways to tone this idea down a bit if fear of being
arrested and/or deported but something in that vein would be good. Just
brain-storming here.

whit3rd
Guest

Sun Feb 10, 2019 7:45 am   



On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 10:28:34 AM UTC-8, Phil Hobbs wrote:
Quote:
So.

I have this effectively-infinitely-fast temperature control gizmo that
I've been dying to make a good demo for. The gizmo produces a volume
which is essentially immune to external thermal forcing, and that's what
I want to demonstrate. The idea would be to show what temperature does
to some unprotected thing, then turn on the controller which will make
it completely immune.


If 'twere me, I'd say keep it simple: a hair dryer and a CO2 jet will make hot
and cold winds, and a thermistor (with a bridge to null and amplifier to gain-control)
can be made to swing a thermometer needle impressively.

Just apply heat for a second and watch the needle move. Then apply cold.
Power the regulator and repeat. It'd be best if the regulator activation was
graphically illustrated (big neon sign saying 'THERMOSTAT ENGAGED' would be nice).

Extra points for blue and red blower activator buttons, for icewater-based
coldside option, where everyone can see the ice.

nuny@bid.nes
Guest

Sun Feb 10, 2019 8:45 am   



On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 10:28:34 AM UTC-8, Phil Hobbs wrote:
Quote:
So.

I have this effectively-infinitely-fast temperature control gizmo that
I've been dying to make a good demo for. The gizmo produces a volume
which is essentially immune to external thermal forcing, and that's what
I want to demonstrate. The idea would be to show what temperature does
to some unprotected thing, then turn on the controller which will make
it completely immune.

I'm thinking of building a sort of thermal Theremin with a crystal
oscillator beating with an LC. That ought to give a nice audible
woo-woo sound when I heat it with a hair dryer or a small heat gun. I
might try dividing the XO down to 10 kHz or so and using a sample-hold
to do the downconversion, so that the signal would never leave the audio
range.

That will sound interesting, but might not be the most compelling demo.

Any alternatives?

(Sorry for the teaser--I'll happily say more about it when the patent
has been filed.)


Most people are visual rather than auditory, so the suggestions using a visual display are good (the digital "24" display is a bit over the top, maybe).

You can play to your audience- what are they interested in protecting? If electronics, one of their products would be good with whatever display or readout or other indication of out-of-range failure is appropriate. Keep the circuitry as obvious and transparent as possible to eliminate suspicions of fakery of course.

Speaking of that you could demonstrate on something pretty much anyone can look at and recognize, something not electronics-related.

You could go with protecting raw egg white from denaturing if you can get past the obvious spoilage and potential health risks of such a demonstration (in other words have someplace to dispose of the unprotected mess), but cracking and egg and separating out the whites while delivering your spiel is a great convincer of geniuneness.

If you do that they will naturally ask about the potential range of operation- what is that range, anyway? Can you use gallium alloys or other "exotic" materials to demonstrate the high/low ends without suspicion of fakery either accidental of intentional?

I mention fakery not because I suspect you, but because something like your idea will be a hard sell and people not intimately familiar with the kind of electronic stuff we are will see it as "magic" and need some more basic convincing.


Mark L. Fergerson

John Larkin
Guest

Sun Feb 10, 2019 5:45 pm   



On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 22:51:03 -0800 (PST), "nuny_at_bid.nes"
<alien8752_at_gmail.com> wrote:

Quote:
On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 10:28:34 AM UTC-8, Phil Hobbs wrote:
So.

I have this effectively-infinitely-fast temperature control gizmo that
I've been dying to make a good demo for. The gizmo produces a volume
which is essentially immune to external thermal forcing, and that's what
I want to demonstrate. The idea would be to show what temperature does
to some unprotected thing, then turn on the controller which will make
it completely immune.

I'm thinking of building a sort of thermal Theremin with a crystal
oscillator beating with an LC. That ought to give a nice audible
woo-woo sound when I heat it with a hair dryer or a small heat gun. I
might try dividing the XO down to 10 kHz or so and using a sample-hold
to do the downconversion, so that the signal would never leave the audio
range.

That will sound interesting, but might not be the most compelling demo.

Any alternatives?

(Sorry for the teaser--I'll happily say more about it when the patent
has been filed.)

Most people are visual rather than auditory, so the suggestions using a visual display are good (the digital "24" display is a bit over the top, maybe).

You can play to your audience- what are they interested in protecting? If electronics, one of their products would be good with whatever display or readout or other indication of out-of-range failure is appropriate. Keep the circuitry as obvious and transparent as possible to eliminate suspicions of fakery of course.

Speaking of that you could demonstrate on something pretty much anyone can look at and recognize, something not electronics-related.

You could go with protecting raw egg white from denaturing if you can get past the obvious spoilage and potential health risks of such a demonstration (in other words have someplace to dispose of the unprotected mess), but cracking and egg and separating out the whites while delivering your spiel is a great convincer of geniuneness.

If you do that they will naturally ask about the potential range of operation- what is that range, anyway? Can you use gallium alloys or other "exotic" materials to demonstrate the high/low ends without suspicion of fakery either accidental of intentional?

I mention fakery not because I suspect you, but because something like your idea will be a hard sell and people not intimately familiar with the kind of electronic stuff we are will see it as "magic" and need some more basic convincing.


Mark L. Fergerson


How about a tiny battery-powered device with LEDs that change color
dramatically over a small temp range? That would be fun.

Sort of AC couple it.



--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics

bitrex
Guest

Sun Feb 10, 2019 10:45 pm   



On 02/10/2019 01:51 AM, nuny_at_bid.nes wrote:
Quote:
On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 10:28:34 AM UTC-8, Phil Hobbs wrote:
So.

I have this effectively-infinitely-fast temperature control gizmo that
I've been dying to make a good demo for. The gizmo produces a volume
which is essentially immune to external thermal forcing, and that's what
I want to demonstrate. The idea would be to show what temperature does
to some unprotected thing, then turn on the controller which will make
it completely immune.

I'm thinking of building a sort of thermal Theremin with a crystal
oscillator beating with an LC. That ought to give a nice audible
woo-woo sound when I heat it with a hair dryer or a small heat gun. I
might try dividing the XO down to 10 kHz or so and using a sample-hold
to do the downconversion, so that the signal would never leave the audio
range.

That will sound interesting, but might not be the most compelling demo.

Any alternatives?

(Sorry for the teaser--I'll happily say more about it when the patent
has been filed.)

Most people are visual rather than auditory, so the suggestions using a visual display are good (the digital "24" display is a bit over the top, maybe).


Oh c'mon can't we have a stink-bomb demo pleeeaseee...

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