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Cycling Safety Transponder, 15m - 45m Range

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elektroda.net NewsGroups Forum Index - Electronic for beginners - Cycling Safety Transponder, 15m - 45m Range

Bret Cahill
Guest

Sat Feb 23, 2019 9:45 pm   



The Bike Shield app never caught on because of spotty data in scenic areas. Also some cyclists don't like posting their GPS.

A transponder is the same thing as a bike light except it's at radio frequencies, works around curves day or night, and motor vehicles tune in to the frequency posted on the "Share the Road; Get Cyclist Alerts At AM 1090" sign.

It would require a dedicated receiver but it would be nice to give the motorist a clue as to the distance to the cyclist around the curve, hidden behind trees, so 3 different frequencies at 3 different power levels could more or less indicate 3 different ranges, 40 - 50 m, 25-35m and 5-20 m.

The GA needs an idea of the cost on a production run basis.


Bret Cahill

default
Guest

Sun Feb 24, 2019 11:45 am   



On Sat, 23 Feb 2019 12:34:44 -0800 (PST), Bret Cahill
<bretcahill_at_aol.com> wrote:

Quote:
The Bike Shield app never caught on because of spotty data in scenic areas. Also some cyclists don't like posting their GPS.

A transponder is the same thing as a bike light except it's at radio frequencies, works around curves day or night, and motor vehicles tune in to the frequency posted on the "Share the Road; Get Cyclist Alerts At AM 1090" sign.

It would require a dedicated receiver but it would be nice to give the motorist a clue as to the distance to the cyclist around the curve, hidden behind trees, so 3 different frequencies at 3 different power levels could more or less indicate 3 different ranges, 40 - 50 m, 25-35m and 5-20 m.

The GA needs an idea of the cost on a production run basis.


Bret Cahill

Doubtful it would work; the signals especially in the vhf or uhf bands
would still be subject to terrain scattering reflection etc.. Maybe
low frequency electromagnetic induction? Assuming that wouldn't
impose too much of a power loss on the bike's electrical system.

Then who is going to pay for it? Car manufacturers? Get the insurance
industry behind it and you may have enough clout to get something like
that installed, regulated, required, and paid for.

Be fun to hack too...

John Larkin
Guest

Sun Feb 24, 2019 4:45 pm   



On Sat, 23 Feb 2019 12:34:44 -0800 (PST), Bret Cahill
<bretcahill_at_aol.com> wrote:

Quote:
The Bike Shield app never caught on because of spotty data in scenic areas. Also some cyclists don't like posting their GPS.

A transponder is the same thing as a bike light except it's at radio frequencies, works around curves day or night, and motor vehicles tune in to the frequency posted on the "Share the Road; Get Cyclist Alerts At AM 1090" sign.

It would require a dedicated receiver but it would be nice to give the motorist a clue as to the distance to the cyclist around the curve, hidden behind trees, so 3 different frequencies at 3 different power levels could more or less indicate 3 different ranges, 40 - 50 m, 25-35m and 5-20 m.

The GA needs an idea of the cost on a production run basis.


Bret Cahill






Are you proposing that every vehicle and every person have a
transponder? That would be a big market. It would have to be imposed
by law.

It's being attempted on airplanes now.


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics

Terminal_Crazy
Guest

Sun Feb 24, 2019 5:45 pm   



In article <f18f6101-52e5-47d8-8700-1fb58b451b0e_at_googlegroups.com>, Bret
Cahill <bretcahill_at_aol.com> wrote:
Quote:
The Bike Shield app never caught on because of spotty data in scenic
areas. Also some cyclists don't like posting their GPS.


Just get yourself a big ass 4x4.

You feel the road lice.

TC

--

terminal_crazy_at_sand-hill.uk

default
Guest

Sun Feb 24, 2019 9:45 pm   



On Sun, 24 Feb 2019 07:19:26 -0800, John Larkin
<jjlarkin_at_highlandtechnology.com> wrote:

Quote:
On Sat, 23 Feb 2019 12:34:44 -0800 (PST), Bret Cahill
bretcahill_at_aol.com> wrote:

The Bike Shield app never caught on because of spotty data in scenic areas. Also some cyclists don't like posting their GPS.

A transponder is the same thing as a bike light except it's at radio frequencies, works around curves day or night, and motor vehicles tune in to the frequency posted on the "Share the Road; Get Cyclist Alerts At AM 1090" sign.

It would require a dedicated receiver but it would be nice to give the motorist a clue as to the distance to the cyclist around the curve, hidden behind trees, so 3 different frequencies at 3 different power levels could more or less indicate 3 different ranges, 40 - 50 m, 25-35m and 5-20 m.

The GA needs an idea of the cost on a production run basis.


Bret Cahill






Are you proposing that every vehicle and every person have a
transponder? That would be a big market. It would have to be imposed
by law.

It's being attempted on airplanes now.


All those "Mark of the Beast" crazies would have a fit.

I'm no one to talk; my cell phone has an aluminized mylar bag, and
I've used it twice in the last year.

Bret Cahill
Guest

Sun Feb 24, 2019 10:45 pm   



Quote:
The Bike Shield app never caught on because of spotty data in scenic areas. Also some cyclists don't like posting their GPS.

A transponder is the same thing as a bike light except it's at radio frequencies, works around curves day or night, and motor vehicles tune in to the frequency posted on the "Share the Road; Get Cyclist Alerts At AM 1090" sign.

It would require a dedicated receiver but it would be nice to give the motorist a clue as to the distance to the cyclist around the curve, hidden behind trees, so 3 different frequencies at 3 different power levels could more or less indicate 3 different ranges, 40 - 50 m, 25-35m and 5-20 m.

The GA needs an idea of the cost on a production run basis.

Are you proposing that every vehicle and every person have a
transponder?


If you just wanted to go with one frequency for one range, say 30 m, then the motorist could, if he wanted, tune into the AM channel posted on the CalTrans sign just like getting traffic and other information.

Even with the 3 range system it could still be totally voluntary for both cyclists and motorists. The motorist could opt out of the dedicated receiver and not tune in to AM either.

Most motorists don't want to run over cyclists while many do want to look at the scenery on California "historical highways" -- one mistake and you are history.

A car tried to pass a cyclist on a curve or hill in NoVa by veering into the on coming lane. NoVa has even worse traffic than NorCal. The motorist hit an on coming vehicle.

> That would be a big market.

2 - 3 billion cyclists on the planet and, with greater safety, even more riders.

Safety is a critical barrier to cycling for many. I will not cycle San Pasqual or Campo Rd.

Quote:
It would have to be imposed
by law.


Windshield wipers and bike lights were introduced before they were required..

This is one of those things that that could be started off with what libertarians like to call "voluntary" that is, ignore the fact that it ups the ante for safety. If most others have a new advantage and you don't keep up you lose ground.

Cyclists will know motorists will probably slack off and look at the ocean thinking they'll get an alert for every cyclist around the curve.

> It's being attempted on airplanes now.

Probably a more expensive longer range system.

The FCC said no licenses would be required for such a short range system, same as those $6 RC helicopters they sell at Vons in the clearance rack along with Thai fermented anchovy sauce.


Bret Cahill

John Larkin
Guest

Mon Feb 25, 2019 1:45 am   



On Sun, 24 Feb 2019 13:03:49 -0800 (PST), Bret Cahill
<bretcahill_at_aol.com> wrote:

Quote:
The Bike Shield app never caught on because of spotty data in scenic areas. Also some cyclists don't like posting their GPS.

A transponder is the same thing as a bike light except it's at radio frequencies, works around curves day or night, and motor vehicles tune in to the frequency posted on the "Share the Road; Get Cyclist Alerts At AM 1090" sign.

It would require a dedicated receiver but it would be nice to give the motorist a clue as to the distance to the cyclist around the curve, hidden behind trees, so 3 different frequencies at 3 different power levels could more or less indicate 3 different ranges, 40 - 50 m, 25-35m and 5-20 m.

The GA needs an idea of the cost on a production run basis.

Are you proposing that every vehicle and every person have a
transponder?

If you just wanted to go with one frequency for one range, say 30 m, then the motorist could, if he wanted, tune into the AM channel posted on the CalTrans sign just like getting traffic and other information.

Even with the 3 range system it could still be totally voluntary for both cyclists and motorists. The motorist could opt out of the dedicated receiver and not tune in to AM either.


Cool. You'd be actively training drivers to kill the peds and cyclists
who don't have transponders.



--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics

Bret Cahill
Guest

Mon Feb 25, 2019 7:45 pm   



Quote:
The Bike Shield app never caught on because of spotty data in scenic areas. Also some cyclists don't like posting their GPS.

A transponder is the same thing as a bike light except it's at radio frequencies, works around curves day or night, and motor vehicles tune in to the frequency posted on the "Share the Road; Get Cyclist Alerts At AM 1090" sign.

It would require a dedicated receiver but it would be nice to give the motorist a clue as to the distance to the cyclist around the curve, hidden behind trees, so 3 different frequencies at 3 different power levels could more or less indicate 3 different ranges, 40 - 50 m, 25-35m and 5-20 m.

The GA needs an idea of the cost on a production run basis.

Are you proposing that every vehicle and every person have a
transponder?

If you just wanted to go with one frequency for one range, say 30 m, then the motorist could, if he wanted, tune into the AM channel posted on the CalTrans sign just like getting traffic and other information.

Even with the 3 range system it could still be totally voluntary for both cyclists and motorists. The motorist could opt out of the dedicated receiver and not tune in to AM either.

Cool. You'd be actively training drivers to kill the peds and cyclists
who don't have transponders.


That was certainly the case when bike lights first appeared. In some ways it's even more true today when up to a third of riders still ride w/o lights _because_ it's now illegal.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

VC 21201, Requirements for Bicycle Equipment

California sets certain minimum requirements for bicycles that operate on public roadways. These include:

Each bike must have a brake that will allow a cyclist to stop one wheel on clean, dry, level pavement.
A bike must have handlebars that rest below the user’s shoulder level.
A user’s bicycle must be an appropriate size that allows the operator to safely use it in an upright position, with the ability to put one foot on the ground.
Any bicycle that operates on a highway or public roadway in the dark must have a lamp emitting white light, a red reflector on the rear of the bicycle, and white or yellow reflectors on the pedals. A rider may attach a white light illuminating lamp to himself or herself in lieu of the first requirement.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The law needs to be updated for lights as well as transponders because a rear red light is more valuable than the front white light. Any rider who isn't using any lights is either suicidal and/or doesn't want to be visible. I often keep extra $1 button cell lights and give them to any nearby gubers who don't have one. They can turn it on after a cop pulls them over.

The City of Tucson - Pima Cnty is very cycling friendly, providing free training, free lunch and I believe free bike lights.


Bret Cahill

George Herold
Guest

Mon Feb 25, 2019 9:45 pm   



On Sunday, February 24, 2019 at 7:10:33 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote:
Quote:
On Sun, 24 Feb 2019 13:03:49 -0800 (PST), Bret Cahill
bretcahill_at_aol.com> wrote:

The Bike Shield app never caught on because of spotty data in scenic areas. Also some cyclists don't like posting their GPS.

A transponder is the same thing as a bike light except it's at radio frequencies, works around curves day or night, and motor vehicles tune in to the frequency posted on the "Share the Road; Get Cyclist Alerts At AM 1090" sign.

It would require a dedicated receiver but it would be nice to give the motorist a clue as to the distance to the cyclist around the curve, hidden behind trees, so 3 different frequencies at 3 different power levels could more or less indicate 3 different ranges, 40 - 50 m, 25-35m and 5-20 m.

The GA needs an idea of the cost on a production run basis.

Are you proposing that every vehicle and every person have a
transponder?

If you just wanted to go with one frequency for one range, say 30 m, then the motorist could, if he wanted, tune into the AM channel posted on the CalTrans sign just like getting traffic and other information.

Even with the 3 range system it could still be totally voluntary for both cyclists and motorists. The motorist could opt out of the dedicated receiver and not tune in to AM either.

Cool. You'd be actively training drivers to kill the peds and cyclists
who don't have transponders.


First no driver will tune in... but if I do, I get a beep beep beep on my
radio? That tells me a biker is nearby but nothing else. A light or
flashing light will be much better for the biker... and asks nothing
of the driver.


Now if we could equip all the deer around here with transponders.....

George H.
Quote:



--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics


default
Guest

Tue Feb 26, 2019 10:45 am   



On Mon, 25 Feb 2019 11:45:22 -0800 (PST), George Herold
<gherold_at_teachspin.com> wrote:

Quote:
On Sunday, February 24, 2019 at 7:10:33 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote:
On Sun, 24 Feb 2019 13:03:49 -0800 (PST), Bret Cahill
bretcahill_at_aol.com> wrote:

The Bike Shield app never caught on because of spotty data in scenic areas. Also some cyclists don't like posting their GPS.

A transponder is the same thing as a bike light except it's at radio frequencies, works around curves day or night, and motor vehicles tune in to the frequency posted on the "Share the Road; Get Cyclist Alerts At AM 1090" sign.

It would require a dedicated receiver but it would be nice to give the motorist a clue as to the distance to the cyclist around the curve, hidden behind trees, so 3 different frequencies at 3 different power levels could more or less indicate 3 different ranges, 40 - 50 m, 25-35m and 5-20 m.

The GA needs an idea of the cost on a production run basis.

Are you proposing that every vehicle and every person have a
transponder?

If you just wanted to go with one frequency for one range, say 30 m, then the motorist could, if he wanted, tune into the AM channel posted on the CalTrans sign just like getting traffic and other information.

Even with the 3 range system it could still be totally voluntary for both cyclists and motorists. The motorist could opt out of the dedicated receiver and not tune in to AM either.

Cool. You'd be actively training drivers to kill the peds and cyclists
who don't have transponders.

First no driver will tune in... but if I do, I get a beep beep beep on my
radio? That tells me a biker is nearby but nothing else. A light or
flashing light will be much better for the biker... and asks nothing
of the driver.


You are right. We'd all have to be sharing GPS data or equipped with
a system similar to aircraft collision avoidance radar systems, with a
display or voice that tells you where the threat is.

To just know there was a bicycle in proximity to an automobile would
be useless.
Quote:


Now if we could equip all the deer around here with transponders.....

George H.



--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics


Bret Cahill
Guest

Tue Feb 26, 2019 7:45 pm   



Quote:
To just know there was a bicycle in proximity to an automobile would
be useless.


Try cycling or driving on CA-1 north of Westport where it side steps the King Range.

John Larkin
Guest

Tue Feb 26, 2019 7:45 pm   



On Sun, 24 Feb 2019 16:24:31 +0000 (GMT), Terminal_Crazy
<Terminal_Crazy_at_sand-hill.uk> wrote:

Quote:
In article <f18f6101-52e5-47d8-8700-1fb58b451b0e_at_googlegroups.com>, Bret
Cahill <bretcahill_at_aol.com> wrote:
The Bike Shield app never caught on because of spotty data in scenic
areas. Also some cyclists don't like posting their GPS.

Just get yourself a big ass 4x4.

You feel the road lice.

TC


How about air-bag bumpers?

Radar chips are getting absurdly cheap.


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc
picosecond timing precision measurement

jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com
http://www.highlandtechnology.com

default
Guest

Wed Feb 27, 2019 2:45 am   



On Tue, 26 Feb 2019 10:26:37 -0800 (PST), Bret Cahill
<bretcahill_at_aol.com> wrote:

Quote:
To just know there was a bicycle in proximity to an automobile would
be useless.

Try cycling or driving on CA-1 north of Westport where it side steps the King Range.

Frankly, cars scare me when I'm bicycling. I've found plenty of
places to explore where there are very few autos.

Bret Cahill
Guest

Sun Mar 03, 2019 2:45 am   



Quote:
To just know there was a bicycle in proximity to an automobile would
be useless.

Try cycling or driving on CA-1 north of Westport where it side steps the King Range.

Frankly, cars scare me when I'm bicycling.


There's an exponential decline in the odds of collision as you move away from traffic outside of the white line. One meter of smooth pavement outside the rumble strip would save a lot of lives.

The problem is many road beds don't have that 1 meter.

Since CalTrans is willing to try _anything_ to keep NorCal roads open they ought to start passive tunnel building:

Anchor pre fabricated Quonset like tunnel segments to the hill side on sections prone to mud slides. Shove enough dirt down on top of the structure to distribute and soften the impact of any large rocks rolling down next mudslide.

The tunnel segments could then be wide enough to accommodate a bike lane. Trying to bulldoze the entire side of the mountain for an extra m of road bed may require a gazillion tons of fill, i.e., Hwy 299 2 years ago.

Quote:
I've found plenty of
places to explore where there are very few autos.


Less traffic doesn't necessarily extrapolate linearly to less accidents because everyone is off guard.

In the city everyone is always aware there are other cyclists, pedestrians as well as motorists nearby.


Bret Cahill

Bret Cahill
Guest

Mon Dec 23, 2019 4:43 am   



Quote:
The Bike Shield app never caught on because of spotty data in scenic areas. Also some cyclists don't like posting their GPS.

A transponder is the same thing as a bike light except it's at radio frequencies, works around curves day or night, and motor vehicles tune in to the frequency posted on the "Share the Road; Get Cyclist Alerts At AM 1090" sign.

It would require a dedicated receiver but it would be nice to give the motorist a clue as to the distance to the cyclist around the curve, hidden behind trees, so 3 different frequencies at 3 different power levels could more or less indicate 3 different ranges, 40 - 50 m, 25-35m and 5-20 m.

The GA needs an idea of the cost on a production run basis.


Bret Cahill






Are you proposing that every vehicle and every person have a
transponder? That would be a big market. It would have to be imposed
by law.


You need to halp out wif some emails to yer assembly person.

Quote:
It's being attempted on airplanes now.


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics


elektroda.net NewsGroups Forum Index - Electronic for beginners - Cycling Safety Transponder, 15m - 45m Range

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