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Guest

Thu May 07, 2020 5:45 am   



https://engineering.stanford.edu/magazine/article/how-we-might-recharge-electric-car-it-drives



--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

Science teaches us to doubt.

Claude Bernard

Bill Sloman
Guest

Thu May 07, 2020 5:45 am   



On Thursday, May 7, 2020 at 2:13:20 PM UTC+10, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
> https://engineering.stanford.edu/magazine/article/how-we-might-recharge-electric-car-it-drives

Neither crazy nor nonsensical. John Larkin can't understand it, but he doesn't understand all that much at the best of times.

Electronics is fast and moving vehicles don't move all that rapidly. It's easy to recharge your electric tooth brush when it's sitting on it's charger.. A vehicle moving across an extended charging network needs a more complicated charging system, but most of us are up to designing relatively complicated electronics.

--

Bill Sloman, Sydney

bitrex
Guest

Thu May 07, 2020 6:45 am   



On 5/7/2020 12:13 AM, jlarkin_at_highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
Quote:


This LED faucet-light powered by the water stream is a clever idea:

<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWd1nsCvdNA>

The energy-scavenging self-sanitizing door handle with UV light emitter
built-in, one of those things I totally thought of myself one afternoon
a few months ago when the C-19 situation happened only to discover it'd
already been invented.

<https://www.techspot.com/news/82276-students-develop-self-sanitizing-door-handle.html>

That's how Daniel Moore died, you know. Disgruntled inventor shot him
when the shooter discovered Moore had already patented something he was
working on. The early history of electronics was pretty gangsta

<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_McFarlan_Moore>

Jeroen Belleman
Guest

Thu May 07, 2020 7:45 am   



On 2020-05-07 07:34, bitrex wrote:
Quote:
[...]

The energy-scavenging self-sanitizing door handle with UV light emitter
built-in, one of those things I totally thought of myself one afternoon
a few months ago when the C-19 situation happened only to discover it'd
already been invented.

https://www.techspot.com/news/82276-students-develop-self-sanitizing-door-handle.html
[..]


Looks overdone and silly. Just making the handle out of copper,
or even just copper-plating it, would make it naturally self-
sanitizing.

Jeroen Belleman

bitrex
Guest

Thu May 07, 2020 7:45 am   



On 5/7/2020 2:07 AM, Jeroen Belleman wrote:
Quote:
On 2020-05-07 07:34, bitrex wrote:
[...]

The energy-scavenging self-sanitizing door handle with UV light emitter
built-in, one of those things I totally thought of myself one afternoon
a few months ago when the C-19 situation happened only to discover it'd
already been invented.

https://www.techspot.com/news/82276-students-develop-self-sanitizing-door-handle.html

[..]

Looks overdone and silly. Just making the handle out of copper,
or even just copper-plating it, would make it naturally self-
sanitizing.

Jeroen Belleman



Copper gets a patina, I don't think you get the effect if it's oxidized.
If you clear-coat the copper same problem.

The oligodynamic effect of brass doorknobs takes hours and some
infectious agents tend to be resistant. UV works in seconds, these
handles look to be for high-traffic areas.


Guest

Thu May 07, 2020 7:45 am   



On Wednesday, May 6, 2020 at 10:34:49 PM UTC-7, bitrex wrote:
Quote:
On 5/7/2020 12:13 AM, jlarkin_at_highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

https://engineering.stanford.edu/magazine/article/how-we-might-recharge-electric-car-it-drives




This LED faucet-light powered by the water stream is a clever idea:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWd1nsCvdNA

The energy-scavenging self-sanitizing door handle with UV light emitter
built-in, one of those things I totally thought of myself one afternoon
a few months ago when the C-19 situation happened only to discover it'd
already been invented.

https://www.techspot.com/news/82276-students-develop-self-sanitizing-door-handle.html


Well, easier way is not to have door handle at all. Just motion sensors.

Actually, we are working on sanitizer for gas pump and charger handles, until there is a cheaper way to do hand-free.

Jasen Betts
Guest

Thu May 07, 2020 8:45 am   



On 2020-05-07, bitrex <user_at_example.net> wrote:
Quote:
On 5/7/2020 2:07 AM, Jeroen Belleman wrote:
On 2020-05-07 07:34, bitrex wrote:
[...]

The energy-scavenging self-sanitizing door handle with UV light emitter
built-in, one of those things I totally thought of myself one afternoon
a few months ago when the C-19 situation happened only to discover it'd
already been invented.

https://www.techspot.com/news/82276-students-develop-self-sanitizing-door-handle.html

[..]

Looks overdone and silly. Just making the handle out of copper,
or even just copper-plating it, would make it naturally self-
sanitizing.

Jeroen Belleman



Copper gets a patina, I don't think you get the effect if it's oxidized.
If you clear-coat the copper same problem.

The oligodynamic effect of brass doorknobs takes hours and some
infectious agents tend to be resistant. UV works in seconds, these
handles look to be for high-traffic areas.


It's the copper ions that are the biocide, patina won't stop thatl;
silver, same deal.

--
Jasen.


Guest

Thu May 07, 2020 11:45 am   



On Wed, 06 May 2020 21:13:12 -0700, jlarkin_at_highlandsniptechnology.com
wrote:

>https://engineering.stanford.edu/magazine/article/how-we-might-recharge-electric-car-it-drives

The low power 5G seems to scare people, just wondering how such high
power magnetic system would scare people Smile. Not to mention erasing
any audio or digital magnetic media carried by the occupants.

Due to different separation from the ground different frequencies
would be needed. If this is built along the road, there would need to
be short (a few meters) sections operating on different frequencies,
when different vehicles pass by.

There are only a few frequency bands allocated for ISM (Industrial,
Scientific, Medical) frequencies, so only a few spot frequencies
would be possible.

A better solution would be building a linear motor "stator" into the
road and have "rotors" in each car. Each car would be moving with the
same speed, thus keeping constant distance between cars. Car steering
could also be connected to the linear motor, so long distance travel
would be possible without active driving.

Sylvia Else
Guest

Thu May 07, 2020 12:45 pm   



On 07-May-20 2:13 pm, jlarkin_at_highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
Quote:


Sylvia.

amdx
Guest

Thu May 07, 2020 12:45 pm   



On 5/7/2020 6:02 AM, Sylvia Else wrote:
Quote:
On 07-May-20 2:13 pm, jlarkin_at_highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

https://engineering.stanford.edu/magazine/article/how-we-might-recharge-electric-car-it-drives




Doesn't sound remotely economic.

Sylvia.


It will be fine after we have enough nuclear power plants to supply
the energy needed for all the electric vehicles.

Interesting but only slightly related.
'Formula One' race engines, the are a 1.6 liter motor with 1000hp.
about 700hp is from a highly developed ICE, the other 300hp is from two
electric motors, that get their power from two sources, one regenerative
braking, the other from exhaust gases, that is converted to electricity
to charge a 20kg lithium battery. But with lots of nuances on how the
motor/generators are put in action
> https://motorsport.tech/formula-1/f1-engines-explained

Mikek

Martin Brown
Guest

Thu May 07, 2020 12:45 pm   



On 07/05/2020 05:41, Bill Sloman wrote:
Quote:
On Thursday, May 7, 2020 at 2:13:20 PM UTC+10, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

https://engineering.stanford.edu/magazine/article/how-we-might-recharge-electric-car-it-drives


I was expecting a perpetual motion machine based on the headline. How
boring - it is actually just another wireless charging technology.

> Neither crazy nor nonsensical. John Larkin can't understand it, but he doesn't understand all that much at the best of times.

It isn't entirely crazy but it would likely kill anyone with a pacemaker
that was crossing the road or in the vehicle.


--
Regards,
Martin Brown

Sylvia Else
Guest

Thu May 07, 2020 1:45 pm   



On 07-May-20 9:38 pm, amdx wrote:
Quote:
On 5/7/2020 6:02 AM, Sylvia Else wrote:
On 07-May-20 2:13 pm, jlarkin_at_highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

https://engineering.stanford.edu/magazine/article/how-we-might-recharge-electric-car-it-drives




Doesn't sound remotely economic.

Sylvia.

 It will be fine after we have enough nuclear power plants to supply
the energy needed for all the electric vehicles.


I was thinking about the economics of installing and maintaining all
that equipment in the roads.

Sylvia.


Guest

Thu May 07, 2020 3:45 pm   



On Thursday, May 7, 2020 at 12:13:20 AM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
> https://engineering.stanford.edu/magazine/article/how-we-might-recharge-electric-car-it-drives

Funded by DoD, which makes it fundamentally moronic. And any claims of scientific or engineering merit have no credibility whatsoever.

If it was funded by DoE then it would be a different story. Hydrogen fuel cell power for vehicles is the way of the future, not this garbage with rechargeables.


Quote:



--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

Science teaches us to doubt.

Claude Bernard


Bill Sloman
Guest

Thu May 07, 2020 3:45 pm   



On Friday, May 8, 2020 at 12:19:16 AM UTC+10, bloggs.fre...@gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
On Thursday, May 7, 2020 at 12:13:20 AM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
https://engineering.stanford.edu/magazine/article/how-we-might-recharge-electric-car-it-drives

Funded by DoD, which makes it fundamentally moronic. And any claims of scientific or engineering merit have no credibility whatsoever.

If it was funded by DoE then it would be a different story. Hydrogen fuel cell power for vehicles is the way of the future, not this garbage with rechargeables.


Twaddle. If you use hydrogen as a fuel, you get about 25% of the energy you used to create it out of water. If you use batteries, you get about 85% of energy you started off with..

Hydrogen only makes sense if you can't lay cables.

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney


Guest

Thu May 07, 2020 4:45 pm   



On Thursday, May 7, 2020 at 10:40:35 AM UTC-4, Bill Sloman wrote:
Quote:
On Friday, May 8, 2020 at 12:19:16 AM UTC+10, bloggs.fre...@gmail.com wrote:
On Thursday, May 7, 2020 at 12:13:20 AM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
https://engineering.stanford.edu/magazine/article/how-we-might-recharge-electric-car-it-drives

Funded by DoD, which makes it fundamentally moronic. And any claims of scientific or engineering merit have no credibility whatsoever.

If it was funded by DoE then it would be a different story. Hydrogen fuel cell power for vehicles is the way of the future, not this garbage with rechargeables.

Twaddle. If you use hydrogen as a fuel, you get about 25% of the energy you used to create it out of water. If you use batteries, you get about 85% of energy you started off with..

Hydrogen only makes sense if you can't lay cables.


Conversion efficiencies are not an issue when the electrolysis is powered by renewable energy. Hydrogen power is the way of the future. That statement is not my opinion, it is the conclusion of extensive literature survey. You will not be given any links or supportive argument to that effect.



Quote:

--
Bill Sloman, Sydney


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