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Coronavirus triggered a 'ruptured heart' in first reported U

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Guest

Tue Apr 28, 2020 1:45 am   



This type of heart rupture occurs more typically in people with high cholesterol levels or abnormalities in the heart muscle, Melinek said. But Dowd's case was very unusual because her heart was a normal size and weight, she said.

"There's something abnormal about the fact that a perfectly normal heart has burst open," Melinek told The San Francisco Chronicle. "Normal hearts don't rupture."

Dowd was reportedly in good health and exercised regularly before she fell sick.

https://www.livescience.com/coronavirus-death-ruputured-heart.html

TTman
Guest

Tue Apr 28, 2020 10:45 am   



On 28/04/2020 00:55, bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
This type of heart rupture occurs more typically in people with high cholesterol levels or abnormalities in the heart muscle, Melinek said. But Dowd's case was very unusual because her heart was a normal size and weight, she said.

"There's something abnormal about the fact that a perfectly normal heart has burst open," Melinek told The San Francisco Chronicle. "Normal hearts don't rupture."

Dowd was reportedly in good health and exercised regularly before she fell sick.

https://www.livescience.com/coronavirus-death-ruputured-heart.html

Link doesn't work ?


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Guest

Tue Apr 28, 2020 2:45 pm   



On Tuesday, April 28, 2020 at 5:41:54 AM UTC-4, TTman wrote:
Quote:
On 28/04/2020 00:55, bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:
This type of heart rupture occurs more typically in people with high cholesterol levels or abnormalities in the heart muscle, Melinek said. But Dowd's case was very unusual because her heart was a normal size and weight, she said.

"There's something abnormal about the fact that a perfectly normal heart has burst open," Melinek told The San Francisco Chronicle. "Normal hearts don't rupture."

Dowd was reportedly in good health and exercised regularly before she fell sick.

https://www.livescience.com/coronavirus-death-ruputured-heart.html

Link doesn't work ?

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Hmmm- dunno why. Run a google search on
"Coronavirus triggered a 'ruptured heart' in first reported US COVID-19 death :livescience.com"

Or go to livescience.com directly.

TTman
Guest

Tue Apr 28, 2020 3:45 pm   



On 28/04/2020 14:25, bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:
> "Coronavirus triggered a 'ruptured heart' in first reported US COVID-19 death :livescience.com"

Seems I can't get it in the UK... most pages there show for half a
second then show this (404) Sorry! Page not found.

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Guest

Tue Apr 28, 2020 5:45 pm   



On Mon, 27 Apr 2020 16:55:54 -0700 (PDT),
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:

Quote:
This type of heart rupture occurs more typically in people with high cholesterol levels or abnormalities in the heart muscle, Melinek said. But Dowd's case was very unusual because her heart was a normal size and weight, she said.

"There's something abnormal about the fact that a perfectly normal heart has burst open," Melinek told The San Francisco Chronicle. "Normal hearts don't rupture."

Dowd was reportedly in good health and exercised regularly before she fell sick.

https://www.livescience.com/coronavirus-death-ruputured-heart.html


Influenza can attack various organs, and cause blood clots, too.

"Very unusual" is good.



--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

Science teaches us to doubt.

Claude Bernard


Guest

Tue Apr 28, 2020 5:45 pm   



On Tuesday, April 28, 2020 at 12:10:02 PM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
Quote:
On Tue, 28 Apr 2020 09:04:21 -0700 (PDT),
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:

On Tuesday, April 28, 2020 at 11:58:35 AM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Mon, 27 Apr 2020 16:55:54 -0700 (PDT),
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:

This type of heart rupture occurs more typically in people with high cholesterol levels or abnormalities in the heart muscle, Melinek said. But Dowd's case was very unusual because her heart was a normal size and weight, she said.

"There's something abnormal about the fact that a perfectly normal heart has burst open," Melinek told The San Francisco Chronicle. "Normal hearts don't rupture."

Dowd was reportedly in good health and exercised regularly before she fell sick.

https://www.livescience.com/coronavirus-death-ruputured-heart.html

Influenza can attack various organs, and cause blood clots, too.

"Very unusual" is good.

In the case of this virus, they know it's going after a plentiful supply of ACE-2 receptors on the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels. And that's not unusual. The blood is loaded with virus particles.



Has anyone tried ACE inhibitors? Lots of people take those.


Right- there is a lot of discussion about them, but I believe the jury is still out about their use against this scourge.

Quote:



--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

Science teaches us to doubt.

Claude Bernard



Guest

Tue Apr 28, 2020 5:45 pm   



On Tue, 28 Apr 2020 09:04:21 -0700 (PDT),
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:

Quote:
On Tuesday, April 28, 2020 at 11:58:35 AM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
On Mon, 27 Apr 2020 16:55:54 -0700 (PDT),
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:

This type of heart rupture occurs more typically in people with high cholesterol levels or abnormalities in the heart muscle, Melinek said. But Dowd's case was very unusual because her heart was a normal size and weight, she said.

"There's something abnormal about the fact that a perfectly normal heart has burst open," Melinek told The San Francisco Chronicle. "Normal hearts don't rupture."

Dowd was reportedly in good health and exercised regularly before she fell sick.

https://www.livescience.com/coronavirus-death-ruputured-heart.html

Influenza can attack various organs, and cause blood clots, too.

"Very unusual" is good.

In the case of this virus, they know it's going after a plentiful supply of ACE-2 receptors on the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels. And that's not unusual. The blood is loaded with virus particles.



Has anyone tried ACE inhibitors? Lots of people take those.



--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

Science teaches us to doubt.

Claude Bernard


Guest

Tue Apr 28, 2020 5:45 pm   



On Tuesday, April 28, 2020 at 11:58:35 AM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
Quote:
On Mon, 27 Apr 2020 16:55:54 -0700 (PDT),
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:

This type of heart rupture occurs more typically in people with high cholesterol levels or abnormalities in the heart muscle, Melinek said. But Dowd's case was very unusual because her heart was a normal size and weight, she said.

"There's something abnormal about the fact that a perfectly normal heart has burst open," Melinek told The San Francisco Chronicle. "Normal hearts don't rupture."

Dowd was reportedly in good health and exercised regularly before she fell sick.

https://www.livescience.com/coronavirus-death-ruputured-heart.html

Influenza can attack various organs, and cause blood clots, too.

"Very unusual" is good.


In the case of this virus, they know it's going after a plentiful supply of ACE-2 receptors on the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels. And that's not unusual. The blood is loaded with virus particles.


Quote:



--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

Science teaches us to doubt.

Claude Bernard



Guest

Wed Apr 29, 2020 3:45 am   



On Mon, 27 Apr 2020 16:55:54 -0700 (PDT),
bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:

Quote:
This type of heart rupture occurs more typically in people with high cholesterol levels or abnormalities in the heart muscle, Melinek said. But Dowd's case was very unusual because her heart was a normal size and weight, she said.

"There's something abnormal about the fact that a perfectly normal heart has burst open," Melinek told The San Francisco Chronicle. "Normal hearts don't rupture."

Dowd was reportedly in good health and exercised regularly before she fell sick.

https://www.livescience.com/coronavirus-death-ruputured-heart.html


We have a friend that got apparent Guillain-Barr in February.
Numbness starting in the feet and progressing up slowly, to about the
waist in this case. It was remotely disgnosed as multiple sclerosis.

Maybe this was corona. It attacks random organs, sometimes the nervous
system, and the symptoms can mmic G-B and MS. It's much better now,
essentially gone. I hope it was corona.

Hey, this is interesting:

http://www.toptradeguru.com/?p=72407

If these graphs are to be believed, we're having an unusually safe
winter this year. We had about 70K total deaths per week in early
2018, and the currently-reported corona death rate is about 14K per
week, so it's not impossible.

The USA runs about 54K deaths per week, average.



--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

Science teaches us to doubt.

Claude Bernard

Ricky C
Guest

Wed Apr 29, 2020 5:45 am   



On Tuesday, April 28, 2020 at 10:39:16 PM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
Quote:

Hey, this is interesting:

http://www.toptradeguru.com/?p=72407

If these graphs are to be believed, we're having an unusually safe
winter this year. We had about 70K total deaths per week in early
2018, and the currently-reported corona death rate is about 14K per
week, so it's not impossible.

The USA runs about 54K deaths per week, average.


Larkin seems misunderstand data as usual. Looking at the seven years shown, the most obvious pattern is for deaths to peak about the first week of Jan and drop steeply by the graph since it is compressed only showing down to the minimum numbers which are well above zero. This year is very much like 2013. A peak the first week of Jan and by the first week of March it had dropped to 16 per week per 100,000 or 160 ppm.

Then when the US starts to shut down in the middle of March the numbers drop. Is that really surprising? People stop skydiving, stop scuba diving, stop being able to spend time with the neighbor's wife now that her husband is home all day.

Oh yeah, many people stop driving! One company that is doing very well with the shut down are the auto insurance companies. I'm going to save 15% in five minutes!!

There's a part of the brain devoted to recognizing faces. It works overtime sometimes seeing faces in the forests and in the dark that aren't there because... it's mission is to "see" faces. Some people have that same problem with finding anomalies in data... when they aren't there. Larkin is very good at seeing in data exactly what he chooses to see, nothing more and nothing less. Sort of a data Humpty Dumpty. Notice the point of comparison was not an average year, or even just the previous year. It was the year of highest deaths. Maybe Larkin likes death.

I wonder how much of the shut down reduction is people *not* being in hospitals? But many of those deaths are not eliminated, simply postponed until people return for the non-essential treatments.

--

Rick C.

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John Robertson
Guest

Wed Apr 29, 2020 5:45 pm   



On 2020/04/29 9:07 a.m., Jeff Layman wrote:
Quote:
On 28/04/20 15:25, TTman wrote:
On 28/04/2020 14:25, bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:
   "Coronavirus triggered a 'ruptured heart' in first reported US
COVID-19 death :livescience.com"

Seems I can't get it in the UK... most pages there show for half a
second then show this (404) Sorry! Page not found.

No problem here accessing the article at
https://www.livescience.com/coronavirus-death-ruputured-heart.html> and
I'm in the UK.


Read it in Canada using a Canadian ISP.

And people want to remove all social distance restrictions? Obviously
more research is needed...

The 2nd wave may be worse than the first for the "Cry Wolf!" effect.
People that weren't affected previously (or didn't know anyone affected)
might tend to ignore the 2nd call for social distancing.

John :-#(#

Jeff Layman
Guest

Wed Apr 29, 2020 5:45 pm   



On 28/04/20 15:25, TTman wrote:
Quote:
On 28/04/2020 14:25, bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:
"Coronavirus triggered a 'ruptured heart' in first reported US COVID-19 death :livescience.com"

Seems I can't get it in the UK... most pages there show for half a
second then show this (404) Sorry! Page not found.


No problem here accessing the article at
<https://www.livescience.com/coronavirus-death-ruputured-heart.html> and
I'm in the UK.

--

Jeff


Guest

Wed Apr 29, 2020 8:45 pm   



On Wednesday, 29 April 2020 17:33:35 UTC+1, John Robertson wrote:
Quote:
On 2020/04/29 9:07 a.m., Jeff Layman wrote:
On 28/04/20 15:25, TTman wrote:
On 28/04/2020 14:25, bloggs.fredbloggs.fred_at_gmail.com wrote:
   "Coronavirus triggered a 'ruptured heart' in first reported US
COVID-19 death :livescience.com"

Seems I can't get it in the UK... most pages there show for half a
second then show this (404) Sorry! Page not found.

No problem here accessing the article at
https://www.livescience.com/coronavirus-death-ruputured-heart.html> and
I'm in the UK.


Read it in Canada using a Canadian ISP.

And people want to remove all social distance restrictions? Obviously
more research is needed...

The 2nd wave may be worse than the first for the "Cry Wolf!" effect.
People that weren't affected previously (or didn't know anyone affected)
might tend to ignore the 2nd call for social distancing.

John :-#(#


I also had no trouble accessing that page - or any others on that website
from the UK, either using my broadband provider or my mobile phone.

John

elektroda.net NewsGroups Forum Index - Electronics Design - Coronavirus triggered a 'ruptured heart' in first reported U

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