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Cascading binary counter ICs

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~misfit~
Guest

Fri Dec 01, 2017 5:02 am   



Once upon a time on usenet Computer Nerd Kev wrote:
Quote:
Peter <noemail_at_pigpond.com> wrote:
On 30/11/2017 6:11 PM, Sylvia Else wrote:
The only question is whether there could be any
problems with cascading three CD4020's?


You should be able to cascade them indefinitely, even to the point
where the pulse length exceeds the MTBF of the device. Just don't
forget to include enough power decoupling.

So given enough 4020s I could trigger a doomsday device 5000 years
from now? Just have to leave a large enough bank deposit to pay
generations unborn to replace the solar panel every 30 years and the
battery every three years. For 5000 years. Assuming the present
financial system, the thermonuclear doomsday package and humanity
last that long. Puts my little project in perspective.

Sort of like a digital version of this:
https://makezine.com/2012/04/25/arthur-gansons-machine-with-concrete/


That's pretty cool. It would easilly have enough power to break the concrete
although the gears will shear their teeth long before that happens. It's a
shame he didn't go up in gear size / strength further away from the motor.

In fact it would be interesting to make a (less reduction) gear train of
increasingly-strong materials with the first gears being made of light
plastic or similar and the final one lifting or perhaps cutting through an
anvil...
--
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy
little classification in the DSM*."
David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)
(*Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders)

Jasen Betts
Guest

Fri Dec 01, 2017 11:30 am   



On 2017-12-01, ~misfit~ <shaun.at.pukekohe_at_gmail.com> wrote:
Quote:
Once upon a time on usenet Computer Nerd Kev wrote:
Peter <noemail_at_pigpond.com> wrote:
On 30/11/2017 6:11 PM, Sylvia Else wrote:
The only question is whether there could be any
problems with cascading three CD4020's?


You should be able to cascade them indefinitely, even to the point
where the pulse length exceeds the MTBF of the device. Just don't
forget to include enough power decoupling.

So given enough 4020s I could trigger a doomsday device 5000 years
from now? Just have to leave a large enough bank deposit to pay
generations unborn to replace the solar panel every 30 years and the
battery every three years. For 5000 years. Assuming the present
financial system, the thermonuclear doomsday package and humanity
last that long. Puts my little project in perspective.

Sort of like a digital version of this:
https://makezine.com/2012/04/25/arthur-gansons-machine-with-concrete/

That's pretty cool. It would easilly have enough power to break the concrete
although the gears will shear their teeth long before that happens. It's a
shame he didn't go up in gear size / strength further away from the motor.

In fact it would be interesting to make a (less reduction) gear train of
increasingly-strong materials with the first gears being made of light
plastic or similar and the final one lifting or perhaps cutting through an
anvil...


the first worm gear will be worn smooth before the last gear tuns a
degree.

using lightweight materials would only make that worse.

--
This email has not been checked by half-arsed antivirus software

~misfit~
Guest

Sat Dec 02, 2017 9:51 am   



Once upon a time on usenet Jasen Betts wrote:
Quote:
On 2017-12-01, ~misfit~ <shaun.at.pukekohe_at_gmail.com> wrote:
Once upon a time on usenet Computer Nerd Kev wrote:
Peter <noemail_at_pigpond.com> wrote:
On 30/11/2017 6:11 PM, Sylvia Else wrote:
The only question is whether there could be any
problems with cascading three CD4020's?


You should be able to cascade them indefinitely, even to the point
where the pulse length exceeds the MTBF of the device. Just don't
forget to include enough power decoupling.

So given enough 4020s I could trigger a doomsday device 5000 years
from now? Just have to leave a large enough bank deposit to pay
generations unborn to replace the solar panel every 30 years and
the battery every three years. For 5000 years. Assuming the present
financial system, the thermonuclear doomsday package and humanity
last that long. Puts my little project in perspective.

Sort of like a digital version of this:
https://makezine.com/2012/04/25/arthur-gansons-machine-with-concrete/

That's pretty cool. It would easilly have enough power to break the
concrete although the gears will shear their teeth long before that
happens. It's a shame he didn't go up in gear size / strength
further away from the motor.

In fact it would be interesting to make a (less reduction) gear
train of increasingly-strong materials with the first gears being
made of light plastic or similar and the final one lifting or
perhaps cutting through an anvil...

the first worm gear will be worn smooth before the last gear tuns a
degree.


I was talking about a shorter gear run with less overall reduction (and
perhaps using a smidgeon of high MoO2 open-gear grease).

> using lightweight materials would only make that worse.

Yep. Unless they were harder lightweight materials (think PVD titanium
dioxide over magnesium alloy) and also 'lighter' in size and scale early in
the train. (Also it was 'thinking out loud' in the spirit of the 'art'
mentioned above.)
--
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy
little classification in the DSM*."
David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)
(*Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders)

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