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Ralph Mowery
Guest

Mon Apr 13, 2015 11:06 pm   



Today I received a call that the cable company (Time Warner) is going
digital. They have some converter boxes I can get from them.

Will the digital off the air converters work that came out several years ago
when the local TV over the air stations went digital work when plugged in to
the cable ?

Jasen Betts
Guest

Tue Apr 14, 2015 12:02 pm   



On 2015-04-13, Ralph Mowery <rmowery28146_at_earthlink.net> wrote:
Quote:
Today I received a call that the cable company (Time Warner) is going
digital. They have some converter boxes I can get from them.

Will the digital off the air converters work that came out several years ago
when the local TV over the air stations went digital work when plugged in to
the cable ?


That depends on what T.W. is going to put on the cable, if forced to
guess i'd guess no, they're probably going to encrypt the content and
use sofware running in the converter or a CA module to control access.

--
umop apisdn

Ralph Mowery
Guest

Tue Apr 14, 2015 7:48 pm   



"Jasen Betts" <jasen_at_xnet.co.nz> wrote in message
news:mgiai0$9oj$1_at_gonzo.reversiblemaps.ath.cx...
Quote:
On 2015-04-13, Ralph Mowery <rmowery28146_at_earthlink.net> wrote:
Today I received a call that the cable company (Time Warner) is going
digital. They have some converter boxes I can get from them.

Will the digital off the air converters work that came out several years
ago
when the local TV over the air stations went digital work when plugged in
to
the cable ?

That depends on what T.W. is going to put on the cable, if forced to
guess i'd guess no, they're probably going to encrypt the content and
use sofware running in the converter or a CA module to control access.


I don't think they are goingtoencryt the data. From my understanding the
newer digital cable ready sets will not need the converter, just the older
analog sets will need them.

I have one TV connected to the regular cable box to get lots of stations and
HBO and such that is encrypted. I have one set that is a newer one that is
digital and cable ready that gets my basic package of local stations and a
few other tihings. I have one in the basement that is an old analog set
that is cable ready and I get about 80 channels on it. To use it with an
outside antenna when the cable is off I now need that converter that the
government was providing a few years back.

I thought that if someone was in an area that had already gone digital they
could tell me if I could use the 'government' converter box when TWC goes to
all digital.

J.B. Wood
Guest

Wed Apr 15, 2015 4:49 pm   



On 04/14/2015 09:48 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:
Quote:
"Jasen Betts" <jasen_at_xnet.co.nz> wrote in message
news:mgiai0$9oj$1_at_gonzo.reversiblemaps.ath.cx...
On 2015-04-13, Ralph Mowery <rmowery28146_at_earthlink.net> wrote:
Today I received a call that the cable company (Time Warner) is going
digital. They have some converter boxes I can get from them.

Will the digital off the air converters work that came out several years
ago
when the local TV over the air stations went digital work when plugged in
to
the cable ?

That depends on what T.W. is going to put on the cable, if forced to
guess i'd guess no, they're probably going to encrypt the content and
use sofware running in the converter or a CA module to control access.


I don't think they are goingtoencryt the data. From my understanding the
newer digital cable ready sets will not need the converter, just the older
analog sets will need them.


Hello, and I was surprised to find in the OP that analog CATV was still
being used anywhere (with the exception of on-campus satellite-fed
distribution systems at retirement communities, etc). I live in the
metro Washington DC area and my CATV provider (Comcast) went digital a
number of years ago. At that time and for quite a while the broadcast
(i.e. what's also available over-the-air) network signals carried on
cable were still analog but all other channels were digital and
encrypted. IOW, you could connect the cable directly to a conventional
analog TV and still tune in just the analog channels.

Now all signals on my cable are encrypted. If you have the appropriate
card slot on your flat-screen TV set, Comcast can provide you with a
plug-in decryption card (it's essentially what's already plugged into a
set-top box). An older CRT-based TV with just a traditional analog
tuner will require an adapter (a "DTA" in Comcast/Xfinity jargon) or a
set-top box (usually needed for on-demand viewing).

I don't know how T.W. is going to handle it (maybe it's moot if Comcast
acquires T.W.) Sincerely,


--
J. B. Wood e-mail: arl_123234_at_hotmail.com

Ralph Mowery
Guest

Wed Apr 15, 2015 8:27 pm   



"J.B. Wood" <arl_123234_at_hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:mglfo5$jl6$1_at_speranza.aioe.org...
Quote:
On 04/14/2015 09:48 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:
"Jasen Betts" <jasen_at_xnet.co.nz> wrote in message

Hello, and I was surprised to find in the OP that analog CATV was still
being used anywhere (with the exception of on-campus satellite-fed
distribution systems at retirement communities, etc). I live in the metro
Washington DC area and my CATV provider (Comcast) went digital a number of
years ago. At that time and for quite a while the broadcast (i.e. what's
also available over-the-air) network signals carried on cable were still
analog but all other channels were digital and encrypted. IOW, you could
connect the cable directly to a conventional analog TV and still tune in
just the analog channels.

Now all signals on my cable are encrypted. If you have the appropriate
card slot on your flat-screen TV set, Comcast can provide you with a
plug-in decryption card (it's essentially what's already plugged into a
set-top box). An older CRT-based TV with just a traditional analog tuner
will require an adapter (a "DTA" in Comcast/Xfinity jargon) or a set-top
box (usually needed for on-demand viewing).

I don't know how T.W. is going to handle it (maybe it's moot if Comcast
acquires T.W.) Sincerely,


I am the OP. I have 2 TVs that are the old analog type. One is in the
basement and the other in a spare bedroom I often look at the one in the
basement while my wife is using the big screen in the living room.

I have looked into the box TWC is wanting us to get. It now appears to me
that even my two digital TV sets will have to have this box or another TWC
digital box to receive anything at all. They say this will be free for
about a year , then they will charge about $ 3 per box each month. That
means to get the other sets to work I will soon be paying about $ 15 more
per month just to get what I am getting now.

No wonder that more are switching off the cable system. For some reason my
wife is just not able to use technology. If she could , I would switch to
the ROKU or such for everything. I have that box now that I use for some
things. It might be time for me to check out the satalite services.

I just bought my own internet cable modem when about a year ago they started
charging about $ 5 per month for the cable modem. Payed about $ 20 for that
box.

Michael Black
Guest

Thu Apr 16, 2015 7:30 am   



On Mon, 13 Apr 2015, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Quote:
Today I received a call that the cable company (Time Warner) is going
digital. They have some converter boxes I can get from them.

Will the digital off the air converters work that came out several years ago
when the local TV over the air stations went digital work when plugged in to
the cable ?

I don't think so.


It turns out there are two types of DTV, the one for over the air and the
one that cable uses. ATSC is used for over the air, QAM is used for
cable. Generally DTV sets receive both, though I seem to recall noticing
somewhere that something could receive one but not the other.

But since the DTV converters were intended for over the air reception, I
suspect they only do ATSC decoding, rather than also QAM. But I'm pretty
sure you need QAM for cable.

Michael

Ralph Mowery
Guest

Thu Apr 16, 2015 7:30 am   



"Michael Black" <et472_at_ncf.ca> wrote in message
news:alpine.LNX.2.02.1504152206390.16816_at_darkstar.example.org...
Quote:
On Mon, 13 Apr 2015, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Today I received a call that the cable company (Time Warner) is going
digital. They have some converter boxes I can get from them.

Will the digital off the air converters work that came out several years
ago
when the local TV over the air stations went digital work when plugged in
to
the cable ?

I don't think so.

It turns out there are two types of DTV, the one for over the air and the
one that cable uses. ATSC is used for over the air, QAM is used for
cable. Generally DTV sets receive both, though I seem to recall noticing
somewhere that something could receive one but not the other.

But since the DTV converters were intended for over the air reception, I
suspect they only do ATSC decoding, rather than also QAM. But I'm pretty
sure you need QAM for cable.

From all this, it looks like I may be going to the Direct TV system. Seems
that every year the cable company finds a way to get more money out of me.
It is not that they go up on the price, but keep adding on charges. Last
time for the internet cable modem they decided to start charging about $ 5
per month. I found a new one to buy for about $ 25 shipped.

Today I got a form leter from cable and they state that nomater what kind of
TV I have I will have to have either the full cable box (that I have one
now) or their adapter. They want to only give me one adapter for one year
and after that it will be $ 2.75 per adapter per month. Looks like they are
going to sort of scramble all the chanels in a few months so only their
boxes will allow a TV hook up.

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