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Don McKenzie
Guest

Tue Apr 26, 2016 12:49 pm   



Apple have stolen my ipad. Yes, this story now has an ending.

I purchased an ipad from Becextech Australia in August 2012, and it was working fine until Apple decided to upgrade
their O/S on the 24th of March 2016, and had locked me out of using it. Becextech is an on line Australian supplier:
https://becextech.com.au/ and they are selling the ipad and iphone range of Apple products. I mean like millions of
dollars worth.

I was forced into activating my ipad using an "@me.com" account. This required a password, and a security question. As
soon as I found I needed to get into the apple store, I was again forced into supplying an email address that could be
verified, plus a password and security questions, as well as credit card info.

I automatically and wrongfully assumed that this new email address was now my apple ID, as that is what it said when I
logged into my accounts. These are all web based accounts: "My Apple ID account", "My Apple icloud account", "The Apple
Support Community", as well as the "App Store" on my ipad.

I was sure that this "@me.com" activation sequence was just that, and not required for the ongoing operation of the
device, as I was never required to use it in the three and a half years I had owned the device. Consequently the
"@me.com" details were lost over the years.

After several attempts at getting it unlocked after the 24th of March, Apple told tell me that the Becextech receipt
(which I actually found after 3 and a half years) is a "Second Hand Receipt", (their words), and not good enough for
proof of purchase, so they can't unlock the iPAD for me. The insinuation was that my device could be stolen, as
Becextech are not an authorized reseller.

What I had been told was that Becextech had to provide proof of purchase of this product from an Authorized Apple dealer
before they will unlock this device. Finally got through to Becextech Australian Support, and gave them a name and phone
number at Apple, but Apple wouldn't speak to them, and said that they didn't instigate the case, so they won't speak to
them. Becextech Australia tried very hard to assist me.

I supplied Apple 3 different receipts from Becextech over a period of time, but they kept knocking me back.

I can't understand why a company such as Apple would allow me to use a device for three and a half years, then stop me
using it, if they thought it was stolen.

I received an email from Apple yesterday the 25th of April 2016, and was told that my proof of purchase was accepted and
they had unlocked my device. I fired the ipad up and it automatically updated the software from V9.3.0 to V9.3.1 and was
usable, but I still suspected that I was left with a big problem.

Today the 26th of April, I once again rang Apple, and asked to speak to a Senior Technical Support Advisor.
We again went on a merry chase for another hour or so, fired up itunes on a pc, and did a complete factory restore. I
was guided through setting my existing Apple store ID to my new ID for the ipad activation.

I knew I had to do this, otherwise when Apple stuffs up the next version update, I will be once again left in the lurch.
And what about passing the device onto another person? Virtually impossible.

The Senior Technical Support Advisors are all excellent staff, and if it wasn't for them, I would have already been to
the media. As for the activation team back in the states that kept knocking me back, and never gave a specific reason,
be nice if they learnt what customer support and service was all about.

Again thank you to every one in these threads that gave me assistance, and proposed questions that I could throw at
Apple. The whole sequence is a sorry story on how not to service a customer correctly.

I own four Apple devices. Would I purchase another? At this point, if I can find good alternatives then I won't be
buying Apple, but technology moves so fast, there may be a future product I could be interested in.

Took over a month to sort this mess out. It was a bug in V9.3.0 and this was updated a few days later to V9.3.1, after
the "@me.com" bug was removed.

If you happened to update as soon as the first version was available, and you didn't have access to your "@me.com"
account, bugger off customer! Don't want to know you!

And if you happen to get an Apple support email address, or several as I did, forget it, they don't answer emails.

Would be a good job if it wasn't for the bloody customers.

Cheers Don...


--
Don McKenzie

http://www.dontronics-shop.com

All Olimex products now 75% to 95% off normal Olimex Prices.
http://www.dontronics-shop.com/olimex-ltd.html
Many other items discounted up to 95% off.
Also discounts on Sparkfun, CCS, SimmStick, etc.

F Murtz
Guest

Tue Apr 26, 2016 1:42 pm   



Don McKenzie wrote:
Quote:

Apple have stolen my ipad. Yes, this story now has an ending.

I purchased an ipad from Becextech Australia in August 2012, and it was
working fine until Apple decided to upgrade their O/S on the 24th of
March 2016, and had locked me out of using it. Becextech is an on line
Australian supplier: https://becextech.com.au/ and they are selling the
ipad and iphone range of Apple products. I mean like millions of dollars
worth.

I was forced into activating my ipad using an "@me.com" account. This
required a password, and a security question. As soon as I found I
needed to get into the apple store, I was again forced into supplying an
email address that could be verified, plus a password and security
questions, as well as credit card info.



There are ways to not supply credit card info although they make it
difficult and hope you will do it. ( I got given an old iphone and
needed an account to down load stuff,I have never given them my credit
card details and only get free stuff)
Glad you got it working again,most of us assumed Apple would do it as
they had not a leg to stand on contrary to the views of those few
American Apple sycophants that do not have the foggiest about law and
rights.


Quote:

I automatically and wrongfully assumed that this new email address was
now my apple ID, as that is what it said when I logged into my accounts.
These are all web based accounts: "My Apple ID account", "My Apple
icloud account", "The Apple Support Community", as well as the "App
Store" on my ipad.

I was sure that this "@me.com" activation sequence was just that, and
not required for the ongoing operation of the device, as I was never
required to use it in the three and a half years I had owned the device.
Consequently the "@me.com" details were lost over the years.

After several attempts at getting it unlocked after the 24th of March,
Apple told tell me that the Becextech receipt (which I actually found
after 3 and a half years) is a "Second Hand Receipt", (their words), and
not good enough for proof of purchase, so they can't unlock the iPAD for
me. The insinuation was that my device could be stolen, as Becextech are
not an authorized reseller.

What I had been told was that Becextech had to provide proof of purchase
of this product from an Authorized Apple dealer before they will unlock
this device. Finally got through to Becextech Australian Support, and
gave them a name and phone number at Apple, but Apple wouldn't speak to
them, and said that they didn't instigate the case, so they won't speak
to them. Becextech Australia tried very hard to assist me.

I supplied Apple 3 different receipts from Becextech over a period of
time, but they kept knocking me back.

I can't understand why a company such as Apple would allow me to use a
device for three and a half years, then stop me using it, if they
thought it was stolen.

I received an email from Apple yesterday the 25th of April 2016, and was
told that my proof of purchase was accepted and they had unlocked my
device. I fired the ipad up and it automatically updated the software
from V9.3.0 to V9.3.1 and was usable, but I still suspected that I was
left with a big problem.

Today the 26th of April, I once again rang Apple, and asked to speak to
a Senior Technical Support Advisor.
We again went on a merry chase for another hour or so, fired up itunes
on a pc, and did a complete factory restore. I was guided through
setting my existing Apple store ID to my new ID for the ipad activation.

I knew I had to do this, otherwise when Apple stuffs up the next version
update, I will be once again left in the lurch. And what about passing
the device onto another person? Virtually impossible.

The Senior Technical Support Advisors are all excellent staff, and if it
wasn't for them, I would have already been to the media. As for the
activation team back in the states that kept knocking me back, and never
gave a specific reason, be nice if they learnt what customer support and
service was all about.

Again thank you to every one in these threads that gave me assistance,
and proposed questions that I could throw at Apple. The whole sequence
is a sorry story on how not to service a customer correctly.

I own four Apple devices. Would I purchase another? At this point, if I
can find good alternatives then I won't be buying Apple, but technology
moves so fast, there may be a future product I could be interested in.

Took over a month to sort this mess out. It was a bug in V9.3.0 and this
was updated a few days later to V9.3.1, after the "@me.com" bug was
removed.

If you happened to update as soon as the first version was available,
and you didn't have access to your "@me.com" account, bugger off
customer! Don't want to know you!

And if you happen to get an Apple support email address, or several as I
did, forget it, they don't answer emails.

Would be a good job if it wasn't for the bloody customers.

Cheers Don...



nospam
Guest

Tue Apr 26, 2016 7:31 pm   



In article <do8hbuF8150U1_at_mid.individual.net>, Don McKenzie <5V_at_2.5A>
wrote:

Quote:
Apple have stolen my ipad. Yes, this story now has an ending.

I purchased an ipad from Becextech Australia in August 2012, and it was
working fine until Apple decided to upgrade
their O/S on the 24th of March 2016, and had locked me out of using it.


no they didn't.

you locked yourself out by forgetting the password to your own account,
something you *still* refuse to accept.

Quote:
Becextech is an on line Australian supplier:
https://becextech.com.au/ and they are selling the ipad and iphone range of
Apple products. I mean like millions of
dollars worth.

I was forced into activating my ipad using an "@me.com" account.


no you weren't.

ios devices are generally activated with an apple id, which can be any
valid email address. under no circumstances must the apple id be a
@me.com account, nor must an ios device be tied to a @me.com account.

furthermore, you can skip the apple id during setup, but that means you
won't be able to buy apps or music, thereby greatly limiting the
functionality

Quote:
This
required a password, and a security question.


as do many online services. nothing unusual there.

the part you are missing is that you're supposed to remember them or
better yet, put the info into a password manager app so that you don't
forget.

Quote:
As
soon as I found I needed to get into the apple store, I was again forced into
supplying an email address that could be
verified, plus a password and security questions, as well as credit card info.


credit card info is not required.

Quote:
I automatically and wrongfully assumed that this new email address was now my
apple ID, as that is what it said when I
logged into my accounts. These are all web based accounts: "My Apple ID
account", "My Apple icloud account", "The Apple
Support Community", as well as the "App Store" on my ipad.


why did you even use two different accounts in the first place? more
importantly, why did you forget the password and security questions?

in other words, it was entirely user error, not apple locking you out.

Quote:
I was sure that this "@me.com" activation sequence was just that, and not
required for the ongoing operation of the
device, as I was never required to use it in the three and a half years I had
owned the device. Consequently the
"@me.com" details were lost over the years.


you were wrong.

Quote:
After several attempts at getting it unlocked after the 24th of March, Apple
told tell me that the Becextech receipt
(which I actually found after 3 and a half years) is a "Second Hand Receipt",
(their words), and not good enough for
proof of purchase, so they can't unlock the iPAD for me. The insinuation was
that my device could be stolen, as
Becextech are not an authorized reseller.


the receipt you provided had no serial number on it. what do you expect
them to say?

Quote:
What I had been told was that Becextech had to provide proof of purchase of
this product from an Authorized Apple dealer
before they will unlock this device. Finally got through to Becextech
Australian Support, and gave them a name and phone
number at Apple, but Apple wouldn't speak to them, and said that they didn't
instigate the case, so they won't speak to
them. Becextech Australia tried very hard to assist me.


it doesn't need to be purchased from an authorized apple dealer.

that was likely so that they could determine it's origin and that it
was legitimately yours.

Quote:
I supplied Apple 3 different receipts from Becextech over a period of time,
but they kept knocking me back.


the receipt you posted didn't have a serial number. it could have been
for *any* ipad, not the one you have.

Quote:
I can't understand why a company such as Apple would allow me to use a device
for three and a half years, then stop me
using it, if they thought it was stolen.


they didn't think it was stolen. they assumed that you know the
password to the apple id you used.

Quote:
I received an email from Apple yesterday the 25th of April 2016, and was told
that my proof of purchase was accepted and
they had unlocked my device. I fired the ipad up and it automatically updated
the software from V9.3.0 to V9.3.1 and was
usable, but I still suspected that I was left with a big problem.


consider yourself to be very lucky.

Quote:
Today the 26th of April, I once again rang Apple, and asked to speak to a
Senior Technical Support Advisor.
We again went on a merry chase for another hour or so, fired up itunes on a
pc, and did a complete factory restore. I
was guided through setting my existing Apple store ID to my new ID for the
ipad activation.

I knew I had to do this, otherwise when Apple stuffs up the next version
update, I will be once again left in the lurch.


no you won't.

all you have to do is remember the password.

> And what about passing the device onto another person? Virtually impossible.

nonsense.

to pass it on to another person, you unlink it from your apple id by
providing the correct password. it takes just a few seconds.

at that point, it can be activated by anyone.

Quote:
The Senior Technical Support Advisors are all excellent staff, and if it
wasn't for them, I would have already been to
the media.


the media would have told you that your problems are because you forgot
your password.

Quote:
As for the activation team back in the states that kept knocking
me back, and never gave a specific reason,
be nice if they learnt what customer support and service was all about.


it'd be nice if you weren't so arrogant and expecting apple to roll
over for your own fuckups.

Quote:
Again thank you to every one in these threads that gave me assistance, and
proposed questions that I could throw at
Apple. The whole sequence is a sorry story on how not to service a customer
correctly.


nope. the whole sequence is why you should remember passwords you use.

try calling your bank and telling them that you forgot your password
and have no idea what the security questions are. see how well that
works out.

Quote:
I own four Apple devices. Would I purchase another? At this point, if I can
find good alternatives then I won't be
buying Apple, but technology moves so fast, there may be a future product I
could be interested in.


you're going to have the same problem no matter what you buy if you
forget the passwords to get in.

Quote:
Took over a month to sort this mess out. It was a bug in V9.3.0 and this was
updated a few days later to V9.3.1, after
the "@me.com" bug was removed.


there is no @me.com bug.

the problem is that you forgot your password

Quote:
If you happened to update as soon as the first version was available, and you
didn't have access to your "@me.com"
account, bugger off customer! Don't want to know you!


you still don't get it, do you?

you activated it with a me.com address and then forgot the password.

you fucked up.

Don McKenzie
Guest

Tue Apr 26, 2016 7:41 pm   



On 26/04/2016 11:31 PM, nospam wrote:
> you fucked up.

so nice to find a kind, considerate, and very understanding person in this day and age, that will go the the nth degree to help others.

you are truly a shining example for others to follow nospam.

Cheers Don...

--
Don McKenzie

http://www.dontronics-shop.com

All Olimex products now 75% to 95% off normal Olimex Prices.
http://www.dontronics-shop.com/olimex-ltd.html
Many other items discounted up to 95% off.
Also discounts on Sparkfun, CCS, SimmStick, etc.

David Taylor
Guest

Tue Apr 26, 2016 8:31 pm   



On 26/04/2016 14:41, Don McKenzie wrote:
Quote:
On 26/04/2016 11:31 PM, nospam wrote:
you fucked up.

so nice to find a kind, considerate, and very understanding person in this day and age, that will go the the nth degree to help others.

you are truly a shining example for others to follow nospam.

Cheers Don...


Simple cure: killfile. There is so much incorrect information from that
source as well.

--
Cheers,
David
Web: http://www.satsignal.eu

Lewis
Guest

Tue Apr 26, 2016 9:41 pm   



In message <do99fhFe5aeU1_at_mid.individual.net>
Don McKenzie <5V_at_2.5A> wrote:
Quote:
On 26/04/2016 11:31 PM, nospam wrote:
you fucked up.

so nice to find a kind, considerate, and very understanding person in
this day and age, that will go the the nth degree to help others.


As oppose to the whiny little bitch who complains about how Apple stole
his iPad because he was too stupid to keep track of his password.

> you are truly a shining example for others to follow nospam.

And you are a shining example of what a 65 IQ is capable of.

--
"What if your DOPE was on fire?"
"Impossible, sir, it's in Johnson's underwear."

Jolly Roger
Guest

Tue Apr 26, 2016 10:06 pm   



Don McKenzie <5V_at_2.5A> wrote:
Quote:
On 26/04/2016 11:31 PM, nospam wrote:
you fucked up.

so nice to find a kind, considerate, and very understanding person in
this day and age, that will go the the nth degree to help others.

you are truly a shining example for others to follow nospam.


Many of us have watched this unfold. You are full of shit. You forgot your
credentials. You didn't bother to reset the password, and instead
bullheadedly entered wrong passwords which locked yourself out of your own
account. Then you have then a receipt with a hand-written serial number on
it. All the while bitching and meaning that you were being treated
unfairly. Even after all your fuck ups, Apple got you back up and running
again, but you continue to black ball them. You just refuse to admit your
own part in the ordeal YOU created for yourself. You take zero
responsibility for your failure to remember your own password and security
answers, and instead blame a company for sticking to their end of the deal
by requiring you to know the password and security answer. Blaming others
for your shortcomings won't get you very far in life. That's a cold, hard
fact of life.

--
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my ravenous SPAM filter.
I often ignore posts from Google. Use a real news client instead.

JR

musika
Guest

Tue Apr 26, 2016 10:56 pm   



On 26/04/2016 14:41, Don McKenzie wrote:
Quote:
On 26/04/2016 11:31 PM, nospam wrote:
you fucked up.

so nice to find a kind, considerate, and very understanding person in this day and age, that will go the the nth degree to help others.

you are truly a shining example for others to follow nospam.

He is a shining wit.



--
Ray
UK

nospam
Guest

Tue Apr 26, 2016 11:16 pm   



In article <do9i0gFgaofU1_at_mid.individual.net>, Jolly Roger
<jollyroger_at_pobox.com> wrote:

Quote:
Don McKenzie <5V_at_2.5A> wrote:
On 26/04/2016 11:31 PM, nospam wrote:
you fucked up.

so nice to find a kind, considerate, and very understanding person in
this day and age, that will go the the nth degree to help others.

you are truly a shining example for others to follow nospam.

Many of us have watched this unfold. You are full of shit. You forgot your
credentials. You didn't bother to reset the password, and instead
bullheadedly entered wrong passwords which locked yourself out of your own
account. Then you have then a receipt with a hand-written serial number on
it. All the while bitching and meaning that you were being treated
unfairly. Even after all your fuck ups, Apple got you back up and running
again, but you continue to black ball them. You just refuse to admit your
own part in the ordeal YOU created for yourself. You take zero
responsibility for your failure to remember your own password and security
answers, and instead blame a company for sticking to their end of the deal
by requiring you to know the password and security answer. Blaming others
for your shortcomings won't get you very far in life. That's a cold, hard
fact of life.


yep.

he's actually quite lucky they cleared it.

Frank Slootweg
Guest

Wed Apr 27, 2016 1:03 am   



Jolly Roger <jollyroger_at_pobox.com> wrote:
Quote:
Don McKenzie <5V_at_2.5A> wrote:
On 26/04/2016 11:31 PM, nospam wrote:
you fucked up.

so nice to find a kind, considerate, and very understanding person in
this day and age, that will go the the nth degree to help others.

you are truly a shining example for others to follow nospam.

Many of us have watched this unfold. You are full of shit. You forgot your
credentials. You didn't bother to reset the password, and instead
bullheadedly entered wrong passwords which locked yourself out of your own
account. Then you have then a receipt with a hand-written serial number on
it. All the while bitching and meaning that you were being treated
unfairly. Even after all your fuck ups, Apple got you back up and running
again, but you continue to black ball them. You just refuse to admit your
own part in the ordeal YOU created for yourself. You take zero
responsibility for your failure to remember your own password and security
answers, and instead blame a company for sticking to their end of the deal
by requiring you to know the password and security answer. Blaming others
for your shortcomings won't get you very far in life. That's a cold, hard
fact of life.


What you clowns 'forget' - read: ignore when faced with 'unpleasant'
counter arguments - is:

1. Fact: If Apple hadn't fscked up the update, there would have been no
problem to start with.

2. Fact: People *will* 'forget'/displace/<whatever> passwords (or other
information). That a fact of life which Apple should - and probably
does - accept.

3. Fact: The Apple ID had his *company name* in it, so it is *trivial*
to check it's his.

4. Fact: The demand for proof of purchase was a fallacy from the very
start.
Nobody has to prove a device is theirs (under non third-world law).
There was no reason to suspect the device was stolen and Apple did
not provide any information to the contrary. (Some silly concept of
'innocent until proven guilty'.)

5. Fact: Apple failed to verify the useage history of the device vis a
vis the Apple ID. If they *had* done that, it would have been trivial
to tie the device, the Apple ID and Don together.

That's probably most of the issues.

Bottom line: Apple caused the problem in the first place, Don's
forgetting the password is something any sane company should be able to
handle, but even if you chalk this one up to him, four out of five
faults are Apple's.

QED.

HTH. HAND. EOD. NKs.

Jolly Roger
Guest

Wed Apr 27, 2016 1:20 am   



On 2016-04-26, Frank Slootweg <this_at_ddress.is.invalid> wrote:
Quote:
Jolly Roger <jollyroger_at_pobox.com> wrote:
Don McKenzie <5V_at_2.5A> wrote:
On 26/04/2016 11:31 PM, nospam wrote:
you fucked up.

so nice to find a kind, considerate, and very understanding person in
this day and age, that will go the the nth degree to help others.

you are truly a shining example for others to follow nospam.

Many of us have watched this unfold. You are full of shit. You forgot your
credentials. You didn't bother to reset the password, and instead
bullheadedly entered wrong passwords which locked yourself out of your own
account. Then you have then a receipt with a hand-written serial number on
it. All the while bitching and meaning that you were being treated
unfairly. Even after all your fuck ups, Apple got you back up and running
again, but you continue to black ball them. You just refuse to admit your
own part in the ordeal YOU created for yourself. You take zero
responsibility for your failure to remember your own password and security
answers, and instead blame a company for sticking to their end of the deal
by requiring you to know the password and security answer. Blaming others
for your shortcomings won't get you very far in life. That's a cold, hard
fact of life.

What you clowns 'forget' - read: ignore when faced with 'unpleasant'
counter arguments - is:

1. Fact: If Apple hadn't fscked up the update, there would have been no
problem to start with.


That's a lie. The fact that the update asked for the original Apple ID
credentials he used to set up the iPad hasn't been ignored or forgotten.

Quote:
2. Fact: People *will* 'forget'/displace/<whatever> passwords (or other
information). That a fact of life which Apple should - and probably
does - accept.


Nobody here has forgotten or ignored the fact that there are password
recovery mechanisms in place to mitigate that - mechanisms Don ignored
instead choosing to keep entering wrong passwords which resulted in his
account being locked.

Quote:
3. Fact: The Apple ID had his *company name* in it, so it is *trivial*
to check it's his.


Irrelevant - if the mere spelling of a user name in an email address was
considered sufficient proof of identification, *many* accounts would be
easily be compromised.

Quote:
4. Fact: The demand for proof of purchase was a fallacy from the very
start.


That's an opinion, not a fact. And you're wrong. The device was locked
due to multiple failed password attempts, and it would be irresponsible
of a company to unlock such a device without proof of ownership. And
those of us who value our property and data appreciate the fact that
Apple protects us by verifying the identity of anyone wanting access to
it.

> There was no reason to suspect the device was stolen

Wrong. Someone had tried multiple times to enter incorrect passwords to
get into it.

> 5. Fact: Apple failed to verify the useage history of the device

You don't know any such thing. This isn't a "fact" but your opinion.

Quote:
Bottom line: Apple caused the problem in the first place, Don's
forgetting the password is something any sane company should be able to
handle, but even if you chalk this one up to him, four out of five
faults are Apple's.

QED.


Nope. Hard fail.

> HTH.

Nope.

> HAND.

You too.

> EOD.

You wish.

> NKs.

FRs.

--
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my ravenous SPAM filter.
I often ignore posts from Google. Use a real news client instead.

JR

nospam
Guest

Wed Apr 27, 2016 1:26 am   



In article <do9sctFj2pkU1_at_mid.individual.net>, Frank Slootweg
<this_at_ddress.is.invalid> wrote:

Quote:
you fucked up.

so nice to find a kind, considerate, and very understanding person in
this day and age, that will go the the nth degree to help others.

you are truly a shining example for others to follow nospam.

Many of us have watched this unfold. You are full of shit. You forgot your
credentials. You didn't bother to reset the password, and instead
bullheadedly entered wrong passwords which locked yourself out of your own
account. Then you have then a receipt with a hand-written serial number on
it. All the while bitching and meaning that you were being treated
unfairly. Even after all your fuck ups, Apple got you back up and running
again, but you continue to black ball them. You just refuse to admit your
own part in the ordeal YOU created for yourself. You take zero
responsibility for your failure to remember your own password and security
answers, and instead blame a company for sticking to their end of the deal
by requiring you to know the password and security answer. Blaming others
for your shortcomings won't get you very far in life. That's a cold, hard
fact of life.

What you clowns 'forget' - read: ignore when faced with 'unpleasant'
counter arguments - is:

1. Fact: If Apple hadn't fscked up the update, there would have been no
problem to start with.


wrong.

if he hadn't forgotten the password there would be no problem.

all he would have needed to do is type it in when the update asked for
it.

the update was *not* the trigger. he would have been asked for the
password if he were to take the device in for repair or if he wanted to
sell it.

Quote:
2. Fact: People *will* 'forget'/displace/<whatever> passwords (or other
information). That a fact of life which Apple should - and probably
does - accept.


apple does accept that, which is why they have a password recovery
procedure for just those people.

the problem is that he tried enough bad passwords that the account was
locked from additional attempts, since it looks like someone was trying
to brute force an attack.

at that point he needs to answer the security questions, except that he
*also* forgot that too, leaving him no way to recover.

if your main hard drive fails *and* your backup hard drive fails,
you're pretty much fucked. that's not the hard drive maker's fault.

Quote:
3. Fact: The Apple ID had his *company name* in it, so it is *trivial*
to check it's his.


meaningless.

email accounts are often hacked (especially on yahoo and aol) or
spoofed.

Quote:
4. Fact: The demand for proof of purchase was a fallacy from the very
start.
Nobody has to prove a device is theirs (under non third-world law).
There was no reason to suspect the device was stolen and Apple did
not provide any information to the contrary. (Some silly concept of
'innocent until proven guilty'.)


yes they do when trying to recover a password for a given device *and*
failing the recovery options.

a thief would not know the answers either, but a legitimate owner could
show that the device is not stolen.

Quote:
5. Fact: Apple failed to verify the useage history of the device vis a
vis the Apple ID. If they *had* done that, it would have been trivial
to tie the device, the Apple ID and Don together.


all of it was tied together. that's not the problem.

the problem is he didn't know the password.

> That's probably most of the issues.

it's actually none of the issues.

Quote:
Bottom line: Apple caused the problem in the first place, Don's
forgetting the password is something any sane company should be able to
handle, but even if you chalk this one up to him, four out of five
faults are Apple's.


nope.

the *sole* cause of the problem is not remembering the password and the
security questions.

he's lucky they reset it. google definitely would not have reset a
google account under those circumstances.

Frank Slootweg
Guest

Wed Apr 27, 2016 3:02 am   



nospam <nospam_at_nospam.invalid> wrote:

[Umpteenth repeat of old moronics deleted.]

[New moronic:]

Quote:
try calling your bank and telling them that you forgot your password
and have no idea what the security questions are. see how well that
works out.


That would work out great! I would have a new 'password' [1] in a
couple of days. (BTW, there's *no* indication that there *were* security
questions, so that part is (also) a read herring.)

That would be because - other than you clowns/jerks can apparently
imagine/accept - *they* [2] - of course - have proper procedures in
place for such a common and to be expected event.

[Umpteenth repeat of more old moronics deleted.]

[1] Most of our banks do not use - inherently unsafe - passwords, but
that's another matter.

[2] That's not to say that Apple does not have proper procedures in
place. The problem is that they did not *follow* proper procedures and
one or more of them forgot to engage their brain.

Jolly Roger
Guest

Wed Apr 27, 2016 3:25 am   



On 2016-04-26, Frank Slootweg <this_at_ddress.is.invalid> wrote:
Quote:
nospam <nospam_at_nospam.invalid> wrote:

[Umpteenth repeat of old moronics deleted.]


[umpteenth repeat of bullshit justification for a complete lack of
personal responsibility on the part of Don]

--
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my ravenous SPAM filter.
I often ignore posts from Google. Use a real news client instead.

JR

Rod Speed
Guest

Wed Apr 27, 2016 3:40 am   



"nospam" <nospam_at_nospam.invalid> wrote in message
news:260420161316238531%nospam_at_nospam.invalid...
Quote:
In article <do9i0gFgaofU1_at_mid.individual.net>, Jolly Roger
jollyroger_at_pobox.com> wrote:

Don McKenzie <5V_at_2.5A> wrote:
On 26/04/2016 11:31 PM, nospam wrote:
you fucked up.

so nice to find a kind, considerate, and very understanding person in
this day and age, that will go the the nth degree to help others.

you are truly a shining example for others to follow nospam.

Many of us have watched this unfold. You are full of shit. You forgot
your
credentials. You didn't bother to reset the password, and instead
bullheadedly entered wrong passwords which locked yourself out of your
own
account. Then you have then a receipt with a hand-written serial number
on
it. All the while bitching and meaning that you were being treated
unfairly. Even after all your fuck ups, Apple got you back up and running
again, but you continue to black ball them. You just refuse to admit
your
own part in the ordeal YOU created for yourself. You take zero
responsibility for your failure to remember your own password and
security
answers, and instead blame a company for sticking to their end of the
deal
by requiring you to know the password and security answer. Blaming others
for your shortcomings won't get you very far in life. That's a cold, hard
fact of life.

yep.

he's actually quite lucky they cleared it.


No luck involved, that's the law here, and even Apple realises that.

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