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A toy oscilloscope for droning?

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Steve Wilson
Guest

Sat Jan 05, 2019 10:45 pm   



John Larkin <jjlarkin_at_highlandtechnology.com> wrote:

Quote:
The Rigols are small, light, cool, reliable, and have color displays,
and usually come with probes. You get perfect storage, signal
averaging, RMS, FFTs, measurement cursors, trigger tricks, and it's a
pretty good frequency counter.


I don't know if they still do, but Rigol used to post instructions on how to
increase the bandwidth of their 50 MHz model to 500MHz.

It basically removed the input 50 MHz filter and fed the signal directly to
the ADC. It has its own internal anti-alias filter so you would not have to
deal with spurious responses.

Other online versions showed how to modify the scope software to increase the
sweep speed to work with the higher bandwidth. The downside was you could
brick the scope if you did it wrong.

John Larkin
Guest

Sat Jan 05, 2019 10:45 pm   



On Sat, 5 Jan 2019 12:58:20 -0800 (PST), speff <spehro_at_gmail.com>
wrote:

Quote:
On Thursday, 3 January 2019 22:22:57 UTC-5, John Doe wrote:
Less than $100 US. For people who are familiar with current low end
prices. I suppose they're crap to an engineer, but bear with me.

Any recommendation for either a handheld or a PC/USB oscilloscope that
might be fun to use with consumer drones? I see some are for automotive
use, is there something in that? In the measly selection of less than
$100 oscilloscopes, what qualities should I look for? Any specific
recommendation?

Does viewing multiple motors or motor drivers at the same time benefit
anything? Or is a single channel enough?

Of course I want it to be useful, but it's as much for amusement.

Those little LCD ARM based things are basically junk and are expensive for what functionality they offer.

Save your pennies for a Rigol or Owon. You will not regret it.

--Spehro Pefhany


Yes. Get a real oscilloscope. $250 or so isn't a lot of money.


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics

John Doe
Guest

Sat Jan 05, 2019 11:45 pm   



John Larkin <jjlarkin_at_highlandtechnology.com> wrote:

Quote:
speff <spehro_at_gmail.com> wrote:
John Doe wrote:

LESS THAN $100 US. For people who are familiar with current low
end prices. I suppose they're crap to an engineer, but bear with
me.

Any recommendation for either a handheld or a PC/USB
oscilloscope that might be fun to use with consumer drones? I
see some are for automotive use, is there something in that? In
the measly selection of less than $100 oscilloscopes, what
qualities should I look for? Any specific recommendation?

Does viewing multiple motors or motor drivers at the same time
benefit anything? Or is a single channel enough?

Of course I want it to be useful, but it's as much for
amusement.

Those little LCD ARM based things are basically junk and are
expensive for what functionality they offer.

Save your pennies for a Rigol or Owon. You will not regret it.

Yes. Get a real oscilloscope. $250 or so isn't a lot of money.


Besides being off-topic... "$250 or so" is a lot of pennies,
especially if "or so" means closer to $350.


Guest

Sun Jan 06, 2019 12:45 am   



On Saturday, 5 January 2019 19:32:57 UTC, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
Quote:
On Fri, 4 Jan 2019 17:08:15 -0800 (PST), tabbypurr wrote:

I've fixed TVs with a lot worse than a crappy scope when younger.
Almost every tool has some use.

Same here. My signal source was 60Hz hummm from touching an input
with my finger. There was also the "signal tracer" for determining
where the signal disappeared.
https://people.ohio.edu/postr/bapix/SigTrac1.htm
https://people.ohio.edu/postr/bapix/SigTrac2.htm
However, I don't think those would be very useful with todays
electronics or for fixing drones.


Luxury! I forget why now, but I once fixed a couple of TVs using 3 filament bulbs as the only testgear. Perhaps I'd moved but not unpacked, dunno. They gave rough readings of v & i. I wasn't so keen on using a finger signal injector on live chassis sets though :)


NT

Peabody
Guest

Sun Jan 06, 2019 4:45 am   



John Doe says...
Quote:
Less than $100 US. For people who are familiar with current low end
prices. I suppose they're crap to an engineer, but bear with me.

Any recommendation for either a handheld or a PC/USB oscilloscope that
might be fun to use with consumer drones? I see some are for automotive
use, is there something in that? In the measly selection of less than
$100 oscilloscopes, what qualities should I look for? Any specific
recommendation?

Does viewing multiple motors or motor drivers at the same time benefit
anything? Or is a single channel enough?

Of course I want it to be useful, but it's as much for amusement.


I built the DSO150 kit from Banggood. It's single channel, and you would
also need a real scope probe. I think these kits are under $20 now plus
another $5 for the probe. You may also need a 9V power supply, but I did the
lipo battery mod described on the JYETech forum, so now it is truly portable.

I use it for microcontroller stuff. It should be fine for servo and stepper
stuff, and audio of course. Not microwave. Smile Actually, I have found it
to be very useful. Just wish it had two channels. A while back on the forum
JYETech said they were working on a 2-channel model. Don't know where that
stands.

There are fakes out there on Ebay and AliExpress. Banggood's stock is
genuine JYETech stuff. Buy it there.

They aren't at all junk. The documentation is quite good, they continue to
offer firmware updates, and they provide good support through the forum.

Video in case you're interested:

https://vimeo.com/205487350

Also a number of videos on Youtube.

George Herold
Guest

Sun Jan 06, 2019 5:45 am   



On Friday, January 4, 2019 at 5:38:54 PM UTC-5, tabb...@gmail.com wrote:
Quote:
On Friday, 4 January 2019 21:38:31 UTC, George Herold wrote:
On Friday, January 4, 2019 at 3:31:51 PM UTC-5, John Doe wrote:
Jeff Liebermann <jeffl_at_cruzio.com> wrote:
John Doe
always.look_at_message.header> wrote:

How does zero dollars sound? If you have a computah with a sound
card, try a software based oscilloscope. I use these:
http://www.sillanumsoft.org/prod01.htm
http://www.daqarta.com
Bandwidth depends on the sound card. You'll find 192KHz sampling
rate sound cards all over eBay:
https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=192khz+sound+card> I suggest
the USB flavor. That will let you see up to about half the
192KHz. However, since your motor drivers produce square waves,
you'll only see half of that again, unless you can live with
looking at sine waves. Find the RPM that your unspecified drone
delivers and calculate the maximum frequency. Since you'll be
looking at something resembling a square wave, you'll need at
least twice that number for your scope bandwidth.

I tried that, long ago. Seems the input impedance was not nearly high
enough to do anything remotely useful.

The low end Rigol is now only $260
https://www.rigolna.com/products/digital-oscilloscopes/1000/

George H.

50MHz 2 channel for $259 is poor compared to something used on ebay. You can get analogue storage too for less than that. Telequipments are relatively good deals for folks that don't need Tek specs.

Sure, that 'scope is a bit old, I think I paid ~$450 for it
5-10 years ago.
Still for 260 you get a bran' spanking new 'scope, with
probes and all.

George H.
Quote:
192kHz sampling might let you see that 96kHz is present, but to see the waveform you need way more samples, bringing f_max down to around 20kHz at best.


NT


John Larkin
Guest

Mon Jan 07, 2019 6:45 pm   



On Sat, 5 Jan 2019 22:23:41 -0000 (UTC), John Doe
<always.look_at_message.header> wrote:

Quote:
John Larkin <jjlarkin_at_highlandtechnology.com> wrote:

speff <spehro_at_gmail.com> wrote:
John Doe wrote:

LESS THAN $100 US. For people who are familiar with current low
end prices. I suppose they're crap to an engineer, but bear with
me.

Any recommendation for either a handheld or a PC/USB
oscilloscope that might be fun to use with consumer drones? I
see some are for automotive use, is there something in that? In
the measly selection of less than $100 oscilloscopes, what
qualities should I look for? Any specific recommendation?

Does viewing multiple motors or motor drivers at the same time
benefit anything? Or is a single channel enough?

Of course I want it to be useful, but it's as much for
amusement.

Those little LCD ARM based things are basically junk and are
expensive for what functionality they offer.

Save your pennies for a Rigol or Owon. You will not regret it.

Yes. Get a real oscilloscope. $250 or so isn't a lot of money.

Besides being off-topic... "$250 or so" is a lot of pennies,
especially if "or so" means closer to $350.







Amazon will sell you a decent scope for about $250.

Or stick to playing with what you admit is toys.


--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics

John Doe
Guest

Tue Jan 08, 2019 9:45 pm   



John Larkin <jjlarkin_at_highlandtechnology.com> wrote:

Quote:
John Doe <always.look_at_message.header> wrote:
John Larkin <jjlarkin_at_highlandtechnology.com> wrote:
speff <spehro_at_gmail.com> wrote:
John Doe wrote:

LESS THAN $100 US. For people who are familiar with current
low end prices. I suppose they're crap to an engineer, but
bear with me.

Any recommendation for either a handheld or a PC/USB
oscilloscope that might be fun to use with consumer drones? I
see some are for automotive use, is there something in that?
In the measly selection of less than $100 oscilloscopes, what
qualities should I look for? Any specific recommendation?

Does viewing multiple motors or motor drivers at the same time
benefit anything? Or is a single channel enough?

Of course I want it to be useful, but it's as much for
amusement.

Those little LCD ARM based things are basically junk and are
expensive for what functionality they offer.

Save your pennies for a Rigol or Owon. You will not regret it.

Yes. Get a real oscilloscope. $250 or so isn't a lot of money.

Besides being off-topic... "$250 or so" is a lot of pennies,
especially if "or so" means closer to $350.

Amazon will sell you a decent scope for about $250.


Another poster says its <$30 oscilloscope is useful for the task.
Apparently a more powerful Hantek 6022BE/BL PC/USB oscilloscope would
be more than adequate.

As any engineer should know, the task (as mentioned in the subject
line) is what matters when purchasing hardware.

> Or stick to playing with what you admit is toys.

I was being humble, Bozo.

John Larkin
Guest

Tue Jan 08, 2019 11:45 pm   



On Tue, 8 Jan 2019 20:19:56 -0000 (UTC), John Doe
<always.look_at_message.header> wrote:

Quote:
John Larkin <jjlarkin_at_highlandtechnology.com> wrote:

John Doe <always.look_at_message.header> wrote:
John Larkin <jjlarkin_at_highlandtechnology.com> wrote:
speff <spehro_at_gmail.com> wrote:
John Doe wrote:

LESS THAN $100 US. For people who are familiar with current
low end prices. I suppose they're crap to an engineer, but
bear with me.

Any recommendation for either a handheld or a PC/USB
oscilloscope that might be fun to use with consumer drones? I
see some are for automotive use, is there something in that?
In the measly selection of less than $100 oscilloscopes, what
qualities should I look for? Any specific recommendation?

Does viewing multiple motors or motor drivers at the same time
benefit anything? Or is a single channel enough?

Of course I want it to be useful, but it's as much for
amusement.

Those little LCD ARM based things are basically junk and are
expensive for what functionality they offer.

Save your pennies for a Rigol or Owon. You will not regret it.

Yes. Get a real oscilloscope. $250 or so isn't a lot of money.

Besides being off-topic... "$250 or so" is a lot of pennies,
especially if "or so" means closer to $350.

Amazon will sell you a decent scope for about $250.

Another poster says its <$30 oscilloscope is useful for the task.
Apparently a more powerful Hantek 6022BE/BL PC/USB oscilloscope would
be more than adequate.


Looks like kind of a nuisance, setting up a PC and USB and running
software every time you use it. For general use, probing uPs and such,
20 MHz would be pretty bad. 50 might be OK, 100 is better.

Quote:

As any engineer should know, the task (as mentioned in the subject
line) is what matters when purchasing hardware.


If you want to be an electrical engineer, spending $250 on a real
oscilloscope doesn't sound like a big deal. For one-time scoping of a
drone interface, the USB scope might be enough.


Quote:

Or stick to playing with what you admit is toys.

I was being humble, Bozo.


Well, keep it up!



--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc
picosecond timing precision measurement

jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com
http://www.highlandtechnology.com

Tom Del Rosso
Guest

Thu Jan 17, 2019 10:45 pm   



John Larkin wrote:
Quote:
On Sat, 5 Jan 2019 12:58:20 -0800 (PST), speff <spehro_at_gmail.com
wrote:

Those little LCD ARM based things are basically junk and are
expensive for what functionality they offer.

Save your pennies for a Rigol or Owon. You will not regret it.

--Spehro Pefhany

Yes. Get a real oscilloscope. $250 or so isn't a lot of money.


The $20 kit on banggood.com is well designed for the most part, fun to
build for a hobby kit, and very practical if you ever need a scope on
top of a ladder to look at RS232 levels or something. I did that once
and it paid for itself. I would not have wanted to hold my Rigol 8 feet
off the floor.

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