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Tom Gardner
Guest

Sat Jan 05, 2019 10:45 pm   



On 05/01/19 21:16, Gerhard Hoffmann wrote:
Quote:
Am 05.01.19 um 21:30 schrieb Tom Gardner:
On 05/01/19 18:25, Gerhard Hoffmann wrote:
Am 05.01.19 um 17:01 schrieb John Larkin:


I have a bunch of HP 32SII's, which is a decent calculator. Almost as
good as the original HP35.

I still have an original HP35. That still should work if I could find
a battery pack. The father of a class mate who worked for BB&C
bought some for us because HP then had no consumer distributors.

They work without the battery; the mains charger is sufficient.

You can get batteries here:
https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/waterhosko/m.html

yes, but I have recycled the charger to charge a NiCd based
ham radio rig.


That .... isn't the choice I would have made!

Quote:
That involved changing that plastic plug to
a LEMO connector. The original cable is probably still around
but it's not worth searching.

I have this hp-41 app in my Android phone  and Warren Furlow's
virtual HP-41 in my windows virtual machines.

Wow. A virtual HP-41 running in a virtual Windows7 machine running
under Linux Mint / VMware.


My desktop calculator is an "HP15" doing something similar.

Always hated half-RPN calculators, and calculators that
give the wrong answer to 1+2*3.

Besides the RPN "gather everything together and then do operation"
always suited my mentality better than the semi-algebraic
"get half, specify operation, get the rest of what's necessary,
do operation".

Gerhard Hoffmann
Guest

Sat Jan 05, 2019 10:45 pm   



Am 05.01.19 um 21:30 schrieb Tom Gardner:
Quote:
On 05/01/19 18:25, Gerhard Hoffmann wrote:
Am 05.01.19 um 17:01 schrieb John Larkin:


I have a bunch of HP 32SII's, which is a decent calculator. Almost as
good as the original HP35.

I still have an original HP35. That still should work if I could find
a battery pack. The father of a class mate who worked for BB&C
bought some for us because HP then had no consumer distributors.

They work without the battery; the mains charger is sufficient.

You can get batteries here:
https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/waterhosko/m.html


yes, but I have recycled the charger to charge a NiCd based
ham radio rig. That involved changing that plastic plug to
a LEMO connector. The original cable is probably still around
but it's not worth searching.

I have this hp-41 app in my Android phone and Warren Furlow's
virtual HP-41 in my windows virtual machines.

Wow. A virtual HP-41 running in a virtual Windows7 machine running
under Linux Mint / VMware.

There is also a real HP-41 somewhere.

Cheers,
Gerhard


Guest

Sun Jan 06, 2019 2:45 am   



On Sat, 5 Jan 2019 19:25:14 +0100, Gerhard Hoffmann
<ghf_at_hoffmann-hochfrequenz.de> wrote:

Quote:
Am 05.01.19 um 17:01 schrieb John Larkin:


I have a bunch of HP 32SII's, which is a decent calculator. Almost as
good as the original HP35.

I still have an original HP35. That still should work if I could find
a battery pack. The father of a class mate who worked for BB&C
bought some for us because HP then had no consumer distributors.


I have clips somewhere around here that hold three AA NiCd batteries
together to fit the HP35/45s. My HP45 has a bad power switch but
otherwise it works (at least the last time I tried it).

Martin Brown
Guest

Tue Jan 08, 2019 10:45 am   



On 03/01/2019 23:14, Phil Hobbs wrote:
Quote:
On 1/3/19 1:10 PM, Martin Brown wrote:

There are quite a few static analysis tools that could go a long way
to catching many of the sorts of mistakes that human programmers make
- but sadly they are not often used Sad People always look hurt when I
run such tools against a supposedly working codebase and find things
wrong.

I used to use PC-Lint, but my most recent version is C++98. ;)

What are your faves?


I have had PC Lint since forever and once had to use a specific early
development C++ IDE compiler that tended to crash horribly if there were
any syntax errors at all in the code it was being asked to compile.

I am a fan of McCabes CCI as a measure of code network complexity with
the addition of a count of decision points so that a switch case gets a
more favourable rating than a cascade of nested if statements.

CCI doesn't tell you where the errors are but if code has a high network
complexity then it is a fair bet that it hides some latent errors. It is
very handy for working out the minimum test vector set to span all code
paths. It is always the seldom travelled paths that fail when used.

The Modula 2 compiler I use has dataflow analysis and by default
(because the developers have a weird sense of humour) it will compile
any references to uninitialised variables to a hard runtime trap. That
is if there is any path to that variable whereby it isn't initialised it
will fail on first use. It tends to annoy people who don't RTFM. It can
be configured to issue serious warnings for all used before initialised,
memory leaks and multiple set of a semaphore (or multiple frees) etc.

Where this sort of thing really scores is in the seldom used paths that
are supposed to handle rare fault events but don't always get adequately
tested in real life. It comes from a different lab but is similar to
Coverity in its approach to finding bugs by parsing the language and
checking that all paths lead to Rome. M2 has a rather more tightly
defined language spec than C or C++ so it is easier than for C/C++. It
is also more of a minority interest so less effort went into it.

A nice review of Coverity is online at ACM here:

https://cacm.acm.org/magazines/2010/2/69354-a-few-billion-lines-of-code-later/fulltext

I particularly like what it has to say about MS Visual C++.NET 2003
under the "Laws of Bug Fixing" "social vs technical".

There are quite a few now. They will usually let you try before you buy
and/or send a tech sales guy to run the tool against a codebase demo. It
is unusual not to be able to find some hidden serious bugs in a big
project although people are not always best pleased to be shown this.

I think there is even a half decent one in the MS Enterprise edition for
which they charge an arm and a leg. They have finally after much
badgering included a cut down version in the free and student editions
(basically if you don't get students into doing things right and doing
the right things you are on a hiding to nothing).

https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/codeanalysis/2012/03/08/whats-new-in-code-analysis-for-visual-studio-2012/

Never used this one but it shows up as promising for C users.

https://community.arm.com/tools/m/videos-files/591/download

Runtime wise I like Boundschecker for Windows stuff (since I am usually
modifying other peoples code of sometimes dubious quality).

--
Regards,
Martin Brown

Phil Hobbs
Guest

Tue Jan 08, 2019 5:45 pm   



On 1/8/19 4:42 AM, Martin Brown wrote:
Quote:
On 03/01/2019 23:14, Phil Hobbs wrote:
On 1/3/19 1:10 PM, Martin Brown wrote:

There are quite a few static analysis tools that could go a long way
to catching many of the sorts of mistakes that human programmers make
- but sadly they are not often used Sad People always look hurt when I
run such tools against a supposedly working codebase and find things
wrong.

I used to use PC-Lint, but my most recent version is C++98. ;)

What are your faves?

I have had PC Lint since forever and once had to use a specific early
development C++ IDE compiler that tended to crash horribly if there were
any syntax errors at all in the code it was being asked to compile.

I am a fan of McCabes CCI as a measure of code network complexity with
the addition of a count of decision points so that a switch case gets a
more favourable rating than a cascade of nested if statements.

CCI doesn't tell you where the errors are but if code has a high network
complexity then it is a fair bet that it hides some latent errors. It is
very handy for working out the minimum test vector set to span all code
paths. It is always the seldom travelled paths that fail when used.

The Modula 2 compiler I use has dataflow analysis and by default
(because the developers have a weird sense of humour) it will compile
any references to uninitialised variables to a hard runtime trap. That
is if there is any path to that variable whereby it isn't initialised it
will fail on first use. It tends to annoy people who don't RTFM. It can
be configured to issue serious warnings for all used before initialised,
memory leaks and multiple set of a semaphore (or multiple frees) etc.

Where this sort of thing really scores is in the seldom used paths that
are supposed to handle rare fault events but don't always get adequately
tested in real life. It comes from a different lab but is similar to
Coverity in its approach to finding bugs by parsing the language and
checking that all paths lead to Rome. M2 has a rather more tightly
defined language spec than C or C++ so it is easier than for C/C++. It
is also more of a minority interest so less effort went into it.

A nice review of Coverity is online at ACM here:

https://cacm.acm.org/magazines/2010/2/69354-a-few-billion-lines-of-code-later/fulltext


I particularly like what it has to say about MS Visual C++.NET 2003
under the "Laws of Bug Fixing" "social vs technical".

There are quite a few now. They will usually let you try before you buy
and/or send a tech sales guy to run the tool against a codebase demo. It
is unusual not to be able to find some hidden serious bugs in a big
project although people are not always best pleased to be shown this.

I think there is even a half decent one in the MS Enterprise edition for
which they charge an arm and a leg. They have finally after much
badgering included a cut down version in the free and student editions
(basically if you don't get students into doing things right and doing
the right things you are on a hiding to nothing).

https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/codeanalysis/2012/03/08/whats-new-in-code-analysis-for-visual-studio-2012/


Never used this one but it shows up as promising for C users.

https://community.arm.com/tools/m/videos-files/591/download

Runtime wise I like Boundschecker for Windows stuff (since I am usually
modifying other peoples code of sometimes dubious quality).

What does Coverity cost per seat?


Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

http://electrooptical.net
https://hobbs-eo.com

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